Alex Young

(CNN)Wearing a nearly 5-inch coat of carbon-composite solar shields, ’s will explore the ’s atmosphere in a mission that is expected to launch in early August. This is ’s first and its outermost atmosphere, called the corona.

“The is buttoned up, looking beautiful and ready for flight,” Nicola Fox, project scientist at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics atory, said during a press conference Friday.
The launch window opens on August 6 between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m. EST and ends on August 19. If all goes according to plan, the probe will launch on the morning of August 6 from on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy , one of the ’s most powerful s. Although the probe itself is about the size of a car, a powerful is needed to escape Earth’s orbit, change direction and reach the .
The two-week window was specifically chosen because the probe will rely on Venus to help it achieve an . Six weeks after launch, the probe will encounter Venus for the first time. It will be used to help slow down the probe, like pulling on a handbrake, to orient the probe so it’s on a path to the .
“The launch energy to reach the is 55 times that required to get to Mars, and two times that needed to get to Pluto,” said Yanping Guo from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics atory, who designed the mission trajectory. “During summer, Earth and the other planets in our solar system are in the most favorable alignment to allow us to get close to the .”
It’s not a journey that any human can make, so is sending a roughly 10-foot-high probe on the historic mission that will put it closer to the than any has ever reached before.
The probe will have to withstand heat and radiation never before experienced by any , but the specially designed mission will also address questions that couldn’t be answered before. Understanding the in greater detail can also shed light on Earth and its place in the solar system, researchers said.
“We’ve been studying the for decades, and now we’re finally going to go where the action is,” said , solar scientist at ’s Goddard Space Flight Center.
Cape Canaveral
In 2017, the craft — initially called the Solar Probe Plus — was renamed the in honor of astrophysicist Eugene Parker.
“This is the first time has named a for a living individual,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in . “It’s a testament to the importance of his body of work, founding a new field of science that also inspired my own research and many important science questions continues to study and further understand every day. I’m very excited to be personally involved honoring a great man and his unprecedented legacy.”
Parker published research predicting the existence of in 1958, when he was a young professor at the University of ’s Enrico Fermi institute. At the time, astronomers believed that the space between planets was a vacuum. Parker’s first paper was rejected, but it was saved by a colleague, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, an astrophysicist who would be awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize for Physics.
Alex Young
Cape Canaveral
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Philadelphia
radiation
Alex Young
Cape Canaveral
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Philadelphia
radiation
Alex Young
Cape Canaveral
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Philadelphia
radiation
is the flow of charged gases from the that is present in most of the solar system. That wind screams past Earth at a million miles per hour, and disturbances of the cause ive space weather that impacts our planet.
Space weather may not sound like something that concerns Earth, but surveys by the National Academy of Sciences have estimated that a solar event without warning could cause $2 trillion in damage in the and leave parts of the country without power for a year.
In order to reach an , the will take seven flybys of Venus that will essentially give the probe a gravity assist, shrinking its over the course of nearly seven years.
The probe will eventually be closer to the than Mercury. It will be close enough to watch whip up from subsonic to supersonic.
When closest to the , the probe’s 4½-inch-thick carbon-composite solar shields will have to withstand temperatures close to 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. Due to its design, the inside of the and its instruments will remain at a comfortable room temperature.
Four suites of instruments will gather the data needed to answer key questions about the . FIELDS will measure electric and magnetic waves around the probe, WISPR will take images, SWEAP will count charged particles and measure their properties and ISOIS will measure the particles across a wide spectrum.
The probe will reach a speed of 450,000 mph around the . On Earth, this speed would enable someone to get from to in one second, the agency said. The mission will also pass through the origin of the solar particles with the highest energy.
The mission is scheduled to end in June 2025.
“The solar probe is going to a region of space that has never been explored before,” Parker said. “It’s very exciting that we’ll finally get a look. One would like to have some more detailed measurements of what’s going on in the . I’m sure that there will be some surprises. There always are.”

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