Nathan Miller obituary, death: Nathan Miller Chocolate Chambersburg

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Nathan Miller obituary, death: Nathan Miller Chocolate Chambersburg

Nathan Miller obituary, death: Beloved Nathan Miller Chambersburg chocolatier has passed away.

He is the proprietor and chocolatier at Nathan Miller Chocolate.

Please say a prayer for his grieving family mourning his death as you read the tributes below:

Please cover Deb and Rick Miller in love and prayers for comfort. They lost their beloved son Nathan and he will be greatly missed by so many.

I just remember him with this amazing dry sense of humor that brought joy to our lives as my sons middle school and highschool friend. Wrestling, soccer, cross country and many sleep overs at our house. Nate had an explorer’s spirit and wasn’t afraid to take risks like my son.

Looking back I never would have dreamed they both would have been business owners. Nate became a chocolatier in Chambersburg after studying abroad and here, all types of culinary skills. Nathan’s chocolates in Chambersburg made the best chocolate.

Nathan was a true example of an overcomer and showed the world that with faith and hard work you can find your dreams. You will be dearly missed and thankyou for the wonderful day I got to come down and have a tour.

Rest in Peace Nate until we meet again. Love and prayers

The Chambersburg community has a lost a real one. I’ll always remember going to $5 punk shows in the event space attached to the coffeehouse, buying bags of my favorite Little Amps coffee, having the best brownie I’ve ever tasted, and tearing up with hometown pride when seeing Nathan’s factory on national TV while on a flight home. Thank you Nathan Miller. Rest Easy.

Nathan Miller obituary

Nathan Miller I met you in the darkest part of my life. You took me under your wing. You told me your dreams of being a chocolatier, I knew you would not only make that a reality, but take it to the highest level.

You were in your twenties, with all your friends, drawn to your house almost nightly, and Sunday barbecues. You were all so smart, fun, creative and welcoming- to an older woman divorcee even though I never felt like the outsider I was.

Your gatherings, many which involved karaoke and music- your go to Karaoke was vintage Pink Floyd and David Bowie. We enjoyed art, the outdoors, our views of spirituality, of course gorgeous food, and a lot of laughter. Then when I was trying to make it as a realtor, you trusted me and hired me, giving me work. You referred your friends and your wonderful uncle Doug Walter.

You grew my business. As time went on your family, Deb Walter Miller with Doug, made me feel welcome, just as you had, with your friends.

When you trusted me to sell your home, I saw you off to go back to Chambersburg to pursue and conquer your dreams. We didn’t stay in touch. I didn’t visit you when your work brought you to Denver. And I didn’t support through your health battle. I never reciprocated any of the joy and generosity you naturally shared with me. I deeply regret that.

My heart is heavy and I pray your heart and soul have been set free. I miss you, and I’m so grateful for all the love and life you showed me.

Nathan Miller obituary, death: Nathan Miller Chocolate Chambersburg

Nathan was a kind, gentle person. He believed in us and helped us get started. He always gave us good advice and held great conversations over his amazing coffee and chocolates. He will be missed and we will think of him every time we take a bite of chocolate. May he rest in peace.

Our downtown mourns. We mourn the loss of Nathan Miller, proprietor and chocolatier at Nathan Miller Chocolate. Nathan provided encouragement and advice to many businesses with our downtown. He collaborated with GearHouse Brewing Co on a chocolate porter and crafted a product known world wide. We offer our condolences and prayers to the Nathan’s family and friends.

📸 – Nathan Miller Chocolate

Saddened to hear about the passing of Nathan Miller of Nathan Miller Chocolate. His dedication to his craft and his effort to revitalize Chambersburg’s Grant-Street-warehouse area were major inspirations for my own business ventures in this town.

“Made with ❤️ from bean to bar then handwrapped by our team. Come visit our factory at 140 North Third Street in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.”

[from the packaging – this bar was a gift to Rach and I from Alex and Moriah].

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MultiChoice Talent Factory South Africa Academy Program 2020 for Aspiring Film-makers | Opportunities For Africans

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Application Deadline:29 January 2020

MultiChoice Group is committed to developing and honing the skills of young, talented and ambitious African storytellers. That is why it is with pride that we announce that the M-Net Magic in Motion (MIM) programme will now be known as the MultiChoice Talent Factory South Africa (MTF ZA) in line with MultiChoice Africa’s broader MTF programme.

This new chapter will carry the same passion for film and movie making, the same devotion for excellence and will continue with our promise of enriching lives. The naming convention allows the business to consolidate all initiatives that are critical in developing a sustainable talent pipeline to the video and entertainment industry.

The MiM Academy was established in 2014 and has been instrumental in helping transform the South African film and TV industry by upskilling students and empowering them with substantial knowledge and experience in just 12 months. The MultiChoice Talent Factory (MTF), which was launched in 2018 by MultiChoice Africa, does the same by upskilling the next generation of passionate young film creatives.

To date, 58 students have been trained through MIM and are making their mark in the video entertainment industry. About 16 Mzansi Magic movies have been produced by participants of this programme and nine graduates have started their own production companies, namely: A tribe called story, Eccentric Circus and Beyond Black.

The MTF ZA programme has three pillars:

Entry Criteria

Applications to be part of MultiChoice Talent Factory ZA (MTFza) Academy class of 2020 are now open and will close on 29 January 2020 MTFza is a 12-month long industry readiness programme that affords the opportunity to learn from some of the leading TV producers in the country while acquiring valuable experience in the directing, producing, cinematography, commissioning, art direction and many other skills.”

Who qualifies?

How to apply?

Download the application form (below), fill it in, provide all the supporting documents listed below and email directly to: [email protected] by 29 January 2020 12pm. Quote the subject line: MTFza Academy 2020 application

Required documents

Important information

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Join Millions Of Christians In Asking Netflix To Cancel Film Depicting Jesus As Homosexual

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This is an absolutely unacceptable provocation. No one has the right to attack the faith of millions of people around the world.

'Porta dos Fondos' - Netflix evil movie

The Brazilian group ‘Porta dos Fondos’ (Translates to “Back door”) has produced a film titled “The First Temptation of Christ” which depicts Jesus Christ as a homosexual in a clear attack to Christianity as Christmas approaches.

Over 1.5 million people have signed a petition asking streamer Netflix to take down the film that portrays Jesus in a gay relationship.

The 46-minute film premiered on Netflix Brazil on Dec. 3 and has since sparked a ton of controversy online for its politically incorrect satire that paints Jesus as a closeted homosexual on Christmas.

Using humor and art as an excuse, this group has attacked Christianity in an unprecedented manner. They supposedly produced this film as a “Christmas” film for their viewers!

In this film they present Christ as having relationships with a homosexual while the disciples are alcoholics and unruly . The Virgin Mary is presented as an adulterous woman who has sex with God the Father ..

“The First Temptation of Christ” sees Jesus and a friend named Orlando arrive at Mary and Joseph’s house where they’ve thrown a birthday party for their son, according to the New York Daily News. Jesus attempts to downplay his relationship with Orlando, who constantly hints that they’re more than just friends.

The outlet reports that the comedy group Porta dos Fundos is responsible for the special, which actually marks their second religious satire following “The Last Hangover,” which depicts Jesus’ disciples looking for him on the morning after the Last Supper. They recently earned an International Emmy Award for best comedy web television special for “The Last Hangover.”

The petition quickly formed and people continue to sign it in a push for the streaming service to take action against the group’s latest special for its alleged insensitivity toward Christians.

The petition which started on Change.org, has so far collected 1,529,504 signatures. It calls upon Netflix to remove the movie, made by comedy sketch group Porta dos Fundos (Backdoor in English).

This is an absolutely unacceptable provocation. No one has the right to attack the faith of millions of people around the world. This type of supposed ‘shows’ only cause one thing: numbing the population to attacks against Christians, according to .

That is why we are asking Netflix to remove this brutal attack on religious freedom.

By signing this campaign, you will be sending an email to the following Netflix executives expressing your disagreement with their film :

  • Reed Hastings, founder and CEO of Netflix
  • Jeff Hensien, Head of the Netflix Consumer Service Department
  • Ted Sarandos, Netflix Content Manager

The post Join Millions Of Christians In Asking Netflix To Cancel Film Depicting Jesus As Homosexual appeared first on Believers Portal.

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Lizzy_winkle death, obituary: How Lizzy_winkle died – what happened

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Lizzy_winkle death, obituary: 15 year old Roblox artist Lizzy_winkle died November 29, 2019 after a long battle with blood cancer – acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Lizzy_Winkle death was announced by her sister Mae on Twitter in a statement that read:

Today @Lizzy_Winkle’s journey ended.

Oct 17, 2004 – Nov 29, 2019.

Thank you. God bless. Stay healthy.

To everyone who’s showing their love and prayers to @Lizzy_Winkle, thank you so much. I have Lizzy’s phone and i have all your messages to be printed so people who will come and see her funeral will know how she is loved and appreciated by her Twitter and Roblox family.

Sooner or later, my sister is just going to be another name. Some may cherish her the others may not. I just want her to be remembered somehow. Before time does it’s thing, pass by.

To everyone, i may not be able to repond to all the messages. The love, prayers and appreciation that all of you are giving to my sister is overwhelming. All those youtube videos are making our sad hearts somehow happy. Thank you everyone. Things aren’t unnoticed. We promise.

I know in my heart that you made Lizzy happy for helping out those kids that are fighting the same battle that Lizzy fought. She didn’t win, but those kids will have a chance because of this.

Let’s remember Lizzy and just smile about the fact that we once had an amazing, talented and fun loving friend, sister, best friend and creator. Mask & wig, is a must have for her outfit. 🤗

Lizzy_Winkle was most notable for her creations in the Roblox Royale high community. She even created a game, Christmas Halo❄☃, which accumulated approximately 504,300 visits before being closed on February 5, 2019.

To honour Lizzy, Callmehbob, the developer known for creating the game Royale High and her husband, LauncelotHandsome set up a charity to support cancer and Lizzy’s memorial.

Lizzy_Winkle memorial game was released on December 1, 2019 as “In Loving Memory of Lizzy_Winkle” on callmehbob’s profile.

In the game, users can walk around the memorial, and write a message with a flower of their choice, to pay respects. As of December 1st, 2019, it has over 200,000 visits and over 11,000 favorites. A smaller memorial inside Royale High’s lobby was added that teleported to this game if interacted with.

LauncelotHandsome, (callmehbob’s husband), started a fundraising live stream for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, dedicated to cancer research. By the conclusion of the stream, $17,753.68 was raised for cancer donation.

Lizzy’s sister, after attending Lizzy_Winkle roblox memorial, wrote on Twitter:

Yesterday, I wrote a description mid-tears with hopes that it would speak of Lizzy’s journey & strength battling Leukemia (ALL)… but today, I smiled attending this roblox memorial for a beautiful young soul.

@eamsomar has seen your flowers🌹& art for her younger sister too.

May her soul rest in perfect peace.

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Collapses: The Venice Biennale and the End of History | Art Practical

Collapses: The Venice Biennale and the End of History

The 2019 Venice Biennale feels like the end of everything: the end of art tourism, the end of vacations, the end of the beach and the climate of pleasure. With bad news about the climate crisis worsening every day, the nationalistic turn of governments from the U.S. to Britain to Italy to India and Brazil, it’s unclear whether the liberal ideology that produces world-scale cultural events like the Biennale can hold much longer, or whether the economic or ecological structures of global tourism can continue to support it. The liberal democratic order of free markets and free will is undermined around the globe by violent nationalism and economic protectionism. The Biennale exhibition, May You Live in Interesting Times, offers little but a hollow scream in opposition. The whole thing feels a bit like buyer’s remorse, a magnum opus from a lapsed believer in Francis Fukuyama’s promise that we’d reached the End of History.1

Arthur Jafa

Joint Italy-EU military vessel with helicopter, Piraeus Port, Greece, August 2019. Photo: Anuradha Vikram

Both the main exhibitions and the various national pavilions feature more women and artists of color this year than any previous. Diversity is manifest with respect to types of work, interests, materials, biographies, and ages of the artists on view. Curator Ralph Rugoff states that “[the artists’] work grows out of a practice of entertaining multiple perspectives: of holding in mind seemingly contradictory notions, and juggling diverse ways of making sense of the world.”2 Diversity and multiplicity appear here to be set up as counternarratives to universalism, the ideology that has historically governed the international contemporary art discourse. But is this in fact the case? Fukuyama says, “The spectacular abundance of advanced liberal economies and the infinitely diverse consumer culture made possible by them seem to both foster and preserve liberalism in the political sphere.” If, as Fukuyama suggests, there are  “fundamental ‘contradictions’ of human life that cannot be resolved in the context of modern liberalism, that would be resolvable by an alternative political-economic structure,”3 diversity is not one of those contradictions. Rather, pluralism reinforces the “common ideological heritage of mankind,”4 while fascism’s resurgence around the globe and the popular embrace of nationalist identity are more of a contradiction in light of the realities of international markets. This is the turn of events that market utopians like Fukuyama failed to anticipate.

Rugoff never comes off as a utopian, given his pervasive air of weary detachment. Rather, the exhibition transmits how it feels to watch the ascent of Donald Trump and the unfolding catastrophe of Brexit from the “all-knowing,” cool remove of the contemporary art insider—omniscient, yet impotent, and unable to divest from toxic habits. George Condo, Sun Yuan and Peng Yu, Christian Marclay, and Arthur Jafa channel an anxiety bordering on panic. Construction, shipping, air travel, commerce, monuments, the body, gender—all once fixed as concepts in the Western imagination, with clearly associated positive values, are now invoked by artists such as Yin Xiuzhen, Nicole Eisenman, Slavs and Tatars, and Martine Gutierrez as hazardous, unstable, and volatile. Nowhere is this instability more evident than in the work of Mari Katayama, a Japanese artist whose self-portraiture tableaus tease the boundary between agency and objectification. These artists, more than the comparably straightforward representation advanced by artists like Zanele Muholi, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, or Gauri Gill, capture the zeitgeist of not just the show but the present time. Our historical moment is monumentally catastrophic, and the usual serious response to extremism doesn’t seem to be working. Instead, the images range from abject to absurd.

astronaut

Indios antropófagos: A Butterfly Garden in the (Urban) Jungle. Peru Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019. Photo: Anuradha Vikram

Especially relevant are the artists who toy with the fetishization of Indigenous bodies and cultures for Western consumption. Within the main exhibition curated by Rugoff, Gutierrez situates her U.S.-born Latinx, trans body within a series of photographic landscapes, Body in Thrall, that challenge touristic notions of indigeneity, cultural authenticity, and romanticized poverty around non-white people. She occupies diverse personas, from a film noir femme fatale to the terrifying Aztec deity Tlazolteotl, “Eater of Filth,” always negotiating the high fashion aesthetics of desire with a subversive decolonial aggression. Similar themes and tactics appear in Indios antropófagos in the Peruvian Pavilion, curated by Gustavo Buntinx, in which historical artifacts from the Spanish colonial era and large mosaic tile works by Christian Bendayán depicting frolicking Indigenous youth come together in a scathing critique of cultural tourism. In the French Pavilion, curated by Martha Kirszenbaum, artist Laure Prouvost references the oceans and the sea life projected to die out by 2048, only 29 years into the future, with a number of glass animals seemingly cast into the sea floor, strewn across a landscape of refuse and discarded technologies.

Back in the real world, there’s no way to excise or sequester the beautiful parts into a future that can outlast the very real catastrophes happening now. The overwhelmingly urgent need for a complete lifestyle change played in my head over the week following my visit to the Biennale, as I recuperated from a difficult personal and professional year on a seven-day Greek Islands cruise with my young children, partner, and parents. Looking over the waters where thousands of migrants have drowned, from the top deck of a massive, yet outdated, luxury vessel, I considered how the looming climate crisis creates a condition of simultaneous enjoyment of the modern world that is all around us, and a mourning for its obvious and inevitable loss. Is this the end of curating? The traditional role of the curator as guardian of the world’s collected treasures seems as irrelevant as the contemporary job of mounting resource-heavy exhibitions for an international crowd of jet-setters. Conceptualism has begun to rot from the head, as when Rugoff controversially chose to include Christoph Büchel’s installation of a salvaged boat that, in 2015, sank in the Mediterranean with more than 800 people aboard. I reflected on this watery tomb, recommissioned as a tourist attraction, while looking out across Piraeus port. In the distance, a military troop (jointly operated by Italy and the European Union) performed exercises atop a warship in a city where anti-immigrant attacks are on the rise. In the seventeenth century, the Venetians gained and lost control of Athens in a rivalry with the Ottomans. Today, it seems the EU’s primary objective in the Mediterranean is to sever thousands of years of interconnection between these three regions. Two years ago, the regenerative promise of art as a universal cultural good was undermined when documenta 14 recreated the financial dynamics of German austerity policies in Athens, Greece afresh. Debts went unpaid, workers uncompensated, all in the name of “fiscal responsibility” that nearly shuttered the sixty-year-old event for good. What better outcome ought we to expect this year from an art event born out of universal nationalism?

Christine Wertheim

Halil Altindere, Space Refugee, 2016. May You Live in Interesting Times, Venice Biennale 2019. Photo: Anuradha Vikram

An explicitly utopian impulse is fugitive in May You Live in Interesting Times, but it manifests in the intersection of art, science, and technology. Margaret and Christine Wertheim’s Crochet Coral Reef raises awareness about preservation of the oceans through a crowdsourcing practice that combines mathematical learning with environmentalism and craft. Tavares Strachan’s meditation on African American astronaut Robert Henry Lawrence, Jr., locates metaphysical discourse about the afterlife within a scientific conversation about space travel—where elsewhere Halil Altindere complicates this view with the tale of Syrian cosmonaut Muhammed Ahmed Faris and his persecution by the state. Ryoji Ikeda bathes us in cleansing white light and describes a massive, thunderous universe of data that takes breathtaking shape before our eyes. Hito Steyerl’s This is the Future is a post-internet pastorale in which computer vision is applied to the Venetian landscape to depict a state of perpetual, dreamlike futurity in which the present persistently refuses to resolve into view. The protagonist of Steyerl’s installation seeks out a garden that she had previously hidden in the future in order to protect it from the ravages of the present.

The song of the Lithuanian Pavilion Sun & Sea (Marina) still rings in my ears:

“When my body dies, I will remain,
In an empty planet without birds, animals and corals.
Yet with the press of a single button,
I will remake this world again”

The finale of Sun & Sea (Marina) details the 3D printing of facsimiles of species in widespread collapse, taking comfort in their simulated resurrection as one would in the cold rays of a dying sun.

Greek Islands

Sun & Sea (Marina), Lithuanian Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019. Photo: Anuradha Vikram

The gentle tenor of the apocalyptic visions in Sun & Sea (Marina) perfectly encapsulates the feeling of living at the outside edge of the story of the human species on planet Earth, with the knowledge that history as we know it may well be about to end because our species is one of millions undergoing collapse. The emptiness of our endeavors is invoked by Shilpa Gupta, whose wildly swinging metal gate hammers an effigy of national borders into a gallery wall. Otobong Nkanga’s drawings in acrylic on crayon reference the mechanical, industrialized nature of exploitation in the 21st century. Unlike the bees, whose society is organized around abundance, we humans have engineered systems to maximize our suffering. If humankind can truly lay claim to a common ideological heritage, as Fukuyama once argued, we have only ourselves to blame for our impending end.

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Naples Senior Center offers drum circle twice a month to senior members

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Naples Senior Center members move to beat of a drum


Liz Freeman


Naples Daily News
Updated 8:00 AM EST Nov 26, 2019

Martha Davis arrives early for drum circle at Naples Senior Center, a giveaway she’s fond of the activity.

“It just makes you feel happy,” Davis, 82, said. “I know it’s healthy for us. (Afterward) I’m full of energy I didn’t have before.”

The 45-minute drum circle sessions began earlier this year as an experiment to see if it held any appeal to members. The center offers 40 different programs each week to keep seniors engaged and active.

Scheduled initially for once a month, attendance at the drum circle quickly mushroomed. The center’s purchase of eight drums didn’t suffice.

Now drum circle is twice a month. The center has purchased a dozen drums and counting.

Jim Sernovitz, 74, is a volunteer who leads drum circle. He wasn’t surprised how quickly it became popular with the seniors.

Drum instructor Jim Sernovitz, center, leads the drum circle, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, at the Naples Senior Center.
Jon Austria/Naples Daily News USA TODAY NETWORK – FLORIDA

“It helps everybody. With drums, you really don’t have to know a lot about music. In a group, it is so loud if you make a mistake, nobody knows.”

The drumming provides exercise through the hand movement, and the vibration can be a stress reliever.

“You feel good when you are done,” he said.

Jackie Faffer, the center’s president and CEO, said drum circle provides members with a connection to others and a sense of interpersonal support.

“This epitomizes the purpose of Naples Senior Center,” she said. “We are all about connecting, energizing and supporting all who participate in our programs. And, when you see the smiles on the faces of our drummers, you know we are also all about having a good time, too.”

Mary-Rina Longo, left, Terry Butts and Carolyn Mulligan participate in a drum circle class, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, at the Naples Senior Center.
Jon Austria/Naples Daily News USA TODAY NETWORK – FLORIDA

Sernovitz started a recent session with some warm up drumming before picking up the tempo. Most of the participants in a recent session were women, except for Art Sturm, 86. He started coming to drum circle three months ago.

“It kind of relaxes me,” Sturm said, adding that he likes it when Sernovitz picks up the pace.

Drum circle events are plentiful in Southwest Florida, with gatherings held in Cambier Park in Naples, at Shangri-La Springs in Bonita Springs and in Centennial Park in Fort Myers, according to a public Facebook page, Fort Myers Drum Circle.

Participants play drums in a drum circle class, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, at the Naples Senior Center.
Jon Austria/Naples Daily News USA TODAY NETWORK – FLORIDA

The Naples center purchased djembe drums, which hail from West Africa. The drum traditionally is carved from a single piece of African hardwood with animal skin as the drumhead, according to a detailed history on the website, drumconnection.com, and is affiliated with a drum circle program in Boston.

Numerous websites refer to health benefits of drum circles as a way to address stress, provide a sense of belonging and a connection to others. Drumming is a way to decrease anxiety and depression, and can improve motor skills and energy.

Terry Butts plays her drum during a drum circle class, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, at the Naples Senior Center.
Jon Austria/Naples Daily News USA TODAY NETWORK – FLORIDA

For Terry Butts, 89, the drum circle at the senior center doesn’t help with her essential tremor, a neurological condition that causes involuntary shaking, but it makes her feel good.

“I love it,” she said. “I like the rhythm. I like the camaraderie.”

The drum circle helps her forget that she’s got essential tremor.

 “I don’t think about it, and the people here are nice,” she said.

Mary-Rina Longo participates in a drum circle class, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, at the Naples Senior Center.
Jon Austria/Naples Daily News USA TODAY NETWORK – FLORIDA

Naples Senior Center is located at 5025 Castello Drive.

For more information, go to naplesseniorcenter.org or call 239-325-4444.

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Eyes Wide Shut review – chilling secrecy, quaintly soft-porn sex | Film | The Guardian

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Eyes Wide Shut, now on rerelease, is fascinating, flawed late Stanley Kubrick, his final film before his death in 1999 at the age of 70. It was adapted from Arthur Schnitzler’s Traumnovelle, or Dream Story, published in 1926 and originally set in Vienna. The film is a tale of sexual obsession among modern-day Manhattan’s wealthy and powerful classes and I originally valued it for its satirical potency, formal control and dreamlike self-possession, all of which are bound up in a certain kind of deadpan absurdity and soft-porn seriousness.

Tom Cruise plays Bill Harford, a well-off New York doctor with a fashionable clientele and a magnificent apartment in Central Park West, happily married to beautiful Alice (Nicole Kidman) a former art gallery director, now a stay-at-home mum to their young daughter. (In the book, they are Jewish, an important part of the doctor’s alienation. Not here.) Unsettled by each other’s flirtatious behaviour at a swell party given by a wealthy patient, Victor Ziegler (Sydney Pollack), and by a consumption of champagne and weed, they later have a furious row in which Alice defiantly confesses her lustful thoughts for a certain other man in her past, and Bill then finds himself on a nighttime odyssey, searching for extramarital adventure and gatecrashing a sinister masked orgy, to which he gains admittance by murmuring the (ironic) password “Fidelio”.




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This revival comes with a brief documentary short about the film, Never Just a Dream, with interviewees including his longtime collaborator, executive producer and brother-in-law Jan Harlan — but not his widow Christiane, and not his most important collaborator, screenwriter Frederic Raphael. It might be time to reissue Raphael’s 1999 memoir of working with Kubrick, Eyes Wide Open, in which Raphael amusingly hints that the tense mood of Cruise’s cab ride out to the creepy orgy mansion was inspired by his own minicab journeys from St Albans railway station to the famed seclusion of Kubrick’s Hertfordshire country home for script discussions.

The title, Eyes Wide Shut, was Kubrick’s, and in my original piece, I wondered whether it related to the idea of imaginary sexual transgression being as potent as real, waking transgressions. In dreams you see and know things clearly, with your eyes wide shut. It’s only now that I can see another comparison that was always under my nose: Malcolm McDowell’s eyes being clipped wide open in A Clockwork Orange, being forced to watch something horrible. There are other visual echoes, such as the eerie emptiness of the elevator lobbies like those in The Shining – which are part of the film’s artificiality and theatricality, mocked a little by the film’s denigrators at the time, but a part of the hallucinatory effect. Then there is the party scene at the beginning, like something from The Shining, where Alice meets her predatory Hungarian suitor (Sky du Mont) who could almost be a ghost. Kubrick’s use of Stravinsky’s Waltz from his Jazz Suite shows his sweet tooth for mainstream classical-music themes, and his predilection for softcore female nudity is a characteristic thought a bit dated in 1999.

Perhaps what we felt was contrived was that orgy scene, although it is disquieting and strange in the Hammer-horror way that originally impressed me. But by 1999, Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho had upped the ante on these ideas of Manhattan super-wealth and depravity, and in comparison, Eyes Wide Shut seemed a tad quaint. Yet now, in the age of Epstein, we can see that it was not so far-fetched to imagine elaborate clubs in which the rich and powerful can disport themselves and exploit the vulnerable. What comes across even more strongly about Eyes Wide Shut now is its chilling emphasis on ruling-class secrecy. This film inspired Jonathan Glazer’s Birth (2004), itself underappreciated at the time.

Cruise and Kidman heartfelt and fervent performances (although the flickering black-and-white moments showing her imagined sexual indulgence don’t work). There are tears, and Cruise in particular lays himself open in that fiercely committed way that he tries everything as an actor. Did their actual marital disputes resemble what happen in this film? Maybe. They were divorced two years after this came out, with much gossip about whether the film had accentuated their discontents. Pollack’s performance as Ziegler is thrillingly cynical and disillusioned.

Eyes Wide Shut is released in the UK on 29 November.

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Philip Glass Is Too Busy to Care About Legacy – The New York Times

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If that’s true, it won’t be until nearly 2100 when a full measure of Mr. Glass’s footprint will be possible. But some weighing can start now. The most instantly recognizable voice in contemporary music, he opened a new chapter in operatic history, pushing the bounds of duration and abstraction. At a time when the most lauded composers disdained overproduction, Mr. Glass wrote unashamedly for everyone and everything — and all stubbornly in the distinctive style he created, establishing a model for serious artists moving from the opera house to the concert hall to the film studio, garnering both Met commissions and Academy Award nominations.

MR. GLASS WAS BORN, almost literally, into music: His father owned a record store in Baltimore, where the composer-to-be absorbed Beethoven, Schubert, Bartok, Shostakovich and Stravinsky — and, perhaps, an intrinsic connection between art and commerce. Over a few years in Paris, Nadia Boulanger was his composition teacher as he was exposed to the jittery-fly modernism of Boulez and Stockhausen. He didn’t hate them, but he didn’t want to compose like them, either.

Those pieces culminated in “Einstein on the Beach,” a dreamlike meditation on scientific discovery, human relations and nuclear apocalypse that progressed in enigmatic episodes, austerely designed and directed by Robert Wilson and with swirling choreography by Lucinda Childs, the dancers representing atomic particles in ceaseless motion.

“When ‘Einstein’ opened,” Mr. Glass said, “we had never performed it straight through without stopping. We didn’t know how long it was. It turned out to be five and a half hours.”

Mr. Glass became a maestro of excruciatingly delayed gratification. “I have no idea what Philip was thinking when he wrote ‘Satyagraha,’” Mr. Guérin said of that 1980 opera, a highly stylized but (compared with “Einstein”) more traditionally plotted story about Gandhi’s early ventures into nonviolent protest in South Africa. “The third act is 45 minutes long, and has just two harmonies. But when it explodes into pure Phrygian scale in the final aria, it’s, like, oh, this totally makes sense.”

When it came to “Satyagraha” and “Akhnaten” (1983), Mr. Glass said, “many people were waiting for the son of ‘Einstein.’ They liked that experience of that throbbing, relentless ensemble playing that we did. Of course I wasn’t going to do that. Why would I do that? I had just done it. So I did something completely different, and it was much too lyrical for some people.”

The bronzed character of the “Akhnaten” score emerged through necessity. The company in Stuttgart, Germany, that commissioned the work was renovating its theater, so the performances took place in a space with a much smaller pit.

With the violas now taking the place of the violins, the sound shifted down an octave, its burnished sheen given body with brasses and punctuated by sometimes raucous percussion. As for the title character, the Egyptian pharaoh who is said to have pioneered monotheism — and to have had all traces of him erased for that blasphemy — Mr. Glass put him onstage from almost the beginning, but tantalizingly delayed his first musical entrance.

“How do I introduce him to the audience so that the first time they hear him, they understand he is a completely radical, unforgivable event in the Egyptians’ history, and they have to destroy him?” Mr. Glass recalled asking himself. “I’ll make him a countertenor, to sound not unnatural, but radical. Radical can be natural. He just was who he was.”

“The world had caught up with his music,” Mr. Guérin said. “The Philip Glass sound became digestible to mass audiences. If you had told the people in New York that the composer of ‘Music in Twelve Parts’ would be able to maintain his musical language and score major Hollywood pictures, they wouldn’t have believed you. But he got to be himself.”

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Mo Abudu tears up during Screening of “Òlòtūré” at Carthage Film Festival in Tunisia

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EbonyLife blockbuster film was selected to screen at the world famous JCC Carthage Film Festival 2019 in Tunisia.

The festival was attended by executive producer, MO Abudu alongside some casts of Oloture, Omoni Oboli, Sharon Ooja and Omowunmi Dada.

The Oloture actors and producer arrived Tunisia earlier this week and the movie was screened yesterday.

Shortly after the screening of Oloture, MO Abudu tearfully gave a speech of how the movie emotionally affects her, as she announced that the entire profit gotten from Oloture will be used to help vulnerable ladies who have been victims of human trafficking.

Set in Nigeria, Òlòtūré is the story of a young, naïve Nigerian journalist who goes undercover to expose the shady underworld of human trafficking.

See the photos below

Watch MO Abudu’s speech below

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Good morning beautiful people and a happy new month. Every single time I watch Oloture it makes me cry. I hold back and fight back the tears, but I still find I cannot hold them back. Òlòtūré is a beautiful film, but it’s a hard-hitting film that deals with the harsh reality of human trafficking and prostitution. I have pledged to put our box office revenue back into fighting this horrid crime. I would like to thank the Carthage Film Festival for sharing our story with the world at the historical LE 4 EME ART last night. On stage here at the end of our screening with our director @KennethGyang and some of our lead cast @OmoniOboli, @SharonOoja and @Omowunmi_Dada. We release our full official trailer at 4pm today. Please lookout for it. We will commence our cinema run at some time end of 1st quarter next year. #OlotureTheMovie #ComingSoon #CarthageFilmFestival #Tunisia __ #SlideLeft to see the full video

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Who Is Alexandra Grant? – Meet Keanu Reeves’ Artist Girlfriend

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For the first time in over a decade, Keanu Reeves made a major red carpet debut with a date. Reeves took Alexandra Grant to the LACMA Art + Film Gala on November 2. They walked the red carpet holding hands, sparking romance rumors. Neither Reeves nor his rep have confirmed whether or not the actor is dating Grant yet.

Stefanie KeenanGetty Images

Grant isn’t a new presence in Reeves’ life though; she’s been there for years. And this isn’t the first time he held her hand on a red carpet either this year.

Here, what to know about Reeves’ rumored new girlfriend.

Reeves and Grant have been friends since at least 2011.

Their first project together was published then. Grant illustrated Reeves’ book Ode to Happiness.

Grant is a 46-year-old artist who has worked with Reeves on multiple projects.

People notes that Grant illustrated two books that Reeves wrote: his 2011 book Ode to Happiness and his 2016 book Shadows. They also founded a publishing company together, X Artists’ Books in 2017.

According to the company’s site, “XAB is a small publisher of thoughtful, high-quality, artist-centered books that fit within and between genres. Our books are works of art; portals to imagined worlds; treasured companions; the fabric of a community. We love the same things about our books as we do about our friends: generosity, open-heartedness, intelligence, mystery, style. They bring sustenance and shift realities. They may occasionally break your heart.”

Grant and Reeves have gone to multiple red carpet events this year.

In June, the two attended Saint Laurent’s fashion show together, and they held hands(!!):

Neilson BarnardGetty Images

In May, they attended the MOCA Benefit:

Rachel LunaGetty Images

The two made their event debut as friends in 2016.

Reeves and Grant were first photographed together at the UNAIDS Galaat Design Miami/Basel in Switzerland.

David M. BenettGetty Images

Reeves and Grant were photographed out on a possible dinner date in October.

According to People, the two were photographed at Giorgio Baldi last month. They “arrived together in Reeve’s Porsche and spent three hours inside the restaurant conversing and sharing a meal.” They left together.

Grant can officiate weddings.

As People pointed out, the artist shared photos of her Instagram showing herself presiding over her friend’s ceremony in Brooklyn.

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Grant is based in Los Angeles but has lived in four different countries.

On her artist site’s bio, Grant wrote that her living abroad in Mexico, France, and Spain in her childhood and adolescence has strongly inspired her language-based work. Per her bio, “Some of the basic questions that fuel her practice are: How do the languages we speak and the images we see form how we think and exchange ideas? How can artists and writers work to create and influence culture in an increasingly technology-driven world?”

She told LA Weekly in May, of why she lives in that city, “I grew up in part in Mexico City, Washington, DC, and Paris, moving between languages and cultures. Los Angeles felt like home from the moment I first arrived in 1995, especially the diversity of people, idioms, foods, and plants (like jacaranda and bougainvillea). There’s an incredible work ethic here—many people are creative and entrepreneurial. Having friends who are working hard practicing their crafts—whether it’s set design, publishing, or acting—is very inspiring.”

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