Journalism without borders: why we are deepening our Europe coverage | World news | The Guardian

In the depth of the financial and economic crisis that was causing misery across much of southern Europe, particularly in 2011, I set off on a reporting trip that contained the germ of what, nearly a decade later, would find expression in This is Europe.

A significant new commitment to deepen the Guardian’s coverage of Europe, This is Europe is a new editorial strand aiming to explore the challenges confronting the continent, that respect no national borders, and how countries are responding to them.

Europe on the Breadline, a four-country road trip in search of some of the human stories behind the impersonal data of the eurozone crisis, took me from food banks and protest marches in Lisbon to the birth of a national citizens’ movement in Málaga.




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In Naples I met a youth worker whose projects with children in difficulty had been hammered by austerity; in Thessaloniki, a professor whose research budget had been slashed by 60% – and a young start-upper determined to succeed regardless.

That series, which led to a second one, this time confined to Greece, talking to those Greeks who were organising to help themselves, was an early attempt at the kind of transnational reporting implied in my current job title – and which This is Europe now aims to take a good deal further.

The whole idea of transnational reporting (journalisme sans frontières, anyone?) recognises that media organisations tend to report the EU from the institutions in Brussels, and from member states in isolation.

Only occasionally have we tried to make sense of issues across Europe – from the climate crisis to data security, migration to the rise of the far right, the working poor to caring for an ageing population, tax avoidance to the urban/rural divide.

It is an issue I have always been aware of, and tried to address before the paper created the role of roving Europe correspondent in 2016.

In 2013, I went back to Thessaloniki and Málaga – with a stop-off in Bologna – to talk to members of southern Europe’s “lost generation”: the 59%, 56% and 40% of under-25s who were then out of work in, respectively, Greece, Spain and in Italy.

In 2014 I made a tour of the populist, Eurosceptic and mainly far-right parties in France, Germany, the Netherlands and Finland that were looking to make major gains in the run-up to the European parliamentary elections of that year.

In 2015, we tried a different approach: for an article published on international labour day, 1 May, about workers taking over their factories, I reported from southern France and Greece, and Guardian colleagues contributed pieces from Spain and Turkey.

In similar efforts, for packages in 2018 and this year on the far-reaching impact of the rise of short-term rental platforms such as Airbnb, and overtourism in general, on Europe’s most historic cities, I wrote about Amsterdam and colleagues covered Berlin, Barcelona, Florence and Prague.




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But all of this has really only been a taster of what we could accomplish, and, over the past three years, my time – and that of many of our correspondents – has been massively taken up by Brexit, leaving precious little bandwidth to think of much else. This is Europe aims to rectify that.

Why is it transnational reporting important? Because it is only when you start comparing and contrasting how different countries are experiencing the same challenges, and how they are addressing them, that you start to see who is doing well, who has developed best practice.

It allows you, for example, to discover that perhaps surprisingly, Finland leads the way in tackling both fake news and homelessness. That France has a hugely successful consumers’ cooperative that is beginning to ensure farmers get paid a fair price for the food they produce.

And that while it may represent a potentially existential challenge to winemakers in Bordeaux, global heating represents a startling opportunity for their colleagues – and, in the not too distant future, rivals – in Scandinavia.

This is Europe: a new Guardian series

This is Europe is a new stream of Guardian journalism that investigates the big challenges that transcend national boundaries, and seeks out the solutions that could benefit us all. These are testing times, and crises are not limited by national borders. But then neither are we.

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Migration, climate, populism and contagious diseases are continent-wide problems. When we report on them through a pan-European lens, we not only understand the challenges better but can tease out solutions wherever they crop up: health in Denmark, for example, or teenage wellbeing in the Netherlands.

We’ve been talking about something similar to This is Europe for years at the Guardian, and now we’re doing it.

It’s a shame Brexit had to happen first, of course. But if we can now report Europe as Europe – as a continent rising (we hope) individually and collectively to the cross-border challenges it faces – more concretely and more informatively, that will be a small consolation.

Be part of the conversation. Sign up to the This is Europe email list to get a weekly selection of the most pressing stories and debates for Europeans – from identity to economics to the environment.

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Mitch Cronin death: Rugby league player dies after backyard training accident during lockdown | The Independent

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Australian rugby league player Mitch Cronin, a Queensland Cup grand final captain, has died after a training accident in his garden, aged 27.

Cronin was found by family members in the swimming pool of his back garden in Brisbane on Friday, having just completed a training workout under Australia’s lockdown restrictions.

It’s understood that the Wynnum Manly captain had carried out a weights session and went into the pool to cool down afterwards, where he is believed to have suffered a suspected heart attack. An autopsy will now be carried out to determine what happened to Cronin.

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The rugby league player spent time with NRL sides Canberra Raiders and Brisbane Broncos but did not make an appearance for the senior sides, but last year he skippered Wynnum Manly to the Queensland Cup grand final last September, where they suffered a 28-10 defeat against the Burleigh Bears.

Speaking to Australian outlet NewsCorp, Cronin’s manager, Paul Hogan, confirmed his death and said it was a “tragic loss of life”. 

“This has left Wynnum club, their players and myself totally shocked,” Hogan said. “He was an outstanding young man and my thoughts are with his family. We are all shattered.”

The QRL competitions manager, Dave Maiden, added. “He was a quality human being who will be mourned by many and missed by all. The people who came across him will be in a state of disbelief. He’s one of the good ones.”

Wynnum Manly chief executive, Hanan Laban, said in a statement: “We are devastated, and we send out love to Chris, Andrea, Ben, Amy and the Cronin family. 

“Mitch was an exceptional young man who was loved and respected by his teammates, his coaching staff, our supporters and the wider rugby league community.

“From the moment he arrived at Wynnum he embodied the values of the Seagulls through his positive attitude, strong work ethic, and deep care for his teammates and his club.”

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Sporting deaths in 2020

1/9 David Stern, 77

Legendary former NBA commissioner David Stern died on New Year’s Day, having led the sport for 30 years between 1984 and 2014 (22 September 1942 – 1 January 2020)

2/9 Kobe Bryant, 41

NBA legend Kobe Bryant was killed in a helicopter crash along with his daughter, Gianna, and seven others (23 August 1978 – 26 January 2020).

3/9 Harry Gregg, 87

Former Manchester United and Northern Ireland goalkeeper, dubbed ‘the hero of Munich’ for his efforts in saving teammates and strangers in the Munich air disaster, died at the Causeway Hospital (27 October 1932 – 16 February 2020)

4/9 Mickey Wright, 85

Mickey Wright, who won an incredible 44 titles in the space of four years between 1961 and 1964 (14 February 1935 – 17 February 2020)
Former Wales rugby player Matthew Watkins died after a battle with cancer (2 September 1978 – 7 March 2020)

6/9 Roger Mayweather, 58

Ex-world champion boxer Roger Mayweather, who was also the uncle and former trainer of undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather (24 April 1961 – 17 March 2020)

7/9 Peter Whittingham, 35

Former Cardiff City and Premier League footballer Peter Whittingham died after suffering an accidental fall at a pub (8 September 1984 – 19 March 2020)

8/9 Radomir Antic, 71

Former Real Madrid, Atletico and Barcelona manager Radomir Antic died after suffering complications with pancreatitis (22 November 1948 – 6 April 2020)

9/9 Tarvaris Jackson, 36

Former Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks and Buffalo Bills quarterback died in a car crash in Alabama (21 April 1983 – 12 April 2020)

1/9 David Stern, 77

Legendary former NBA commissioner David Stern died on New Year’s Day, having led the sport for 30 years between 1984 and 2014 (22 September 1942 – 1 January 2020)

2/9 Kobe Bryant, 41

NBA legend Kobe Bryant was killed in a helicopter crash along with his daughter, Gianna, and seven others (23 August 1978 – 26 January 2020).

3/9 Harry Gregg, 87

Former Manchester United and Northern Ireland goalkeeper, dubbed ‘the hero of Munich’ for his efforts in saving teammates and strangers in the Munich air disaster, died at the Causeway Hospital (27 October 1932 – 16 February 2020)

4/9 Mickey Wright, 85

Mickey Wright, who won an incredible 44 titles in the space of four years between 1961 and 1964 (14 February 1935 – 17 February 2020)
Former Wales rugby player Matthew Watkins died after a battle with cancer (2 September 1978 – 7 March 2020)

6/9 Roger Mayweather, 58

Ex-world champion boxer Roger Mayweather, who was also the uncle and former trainer of undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather (24 April 1961 – 17 March 2020)

7/9 Peter Whittingham, 35

Former Cardiff City and Premier League footballer Peter Whittingham died after suffering an accidental fall at a pub (8 September 1984 – 19 March 2020)

8/9 Radomir Antic, 71

Former Real Madrid, Atletico and Barcelona manager Radomir Antic died after suffering complications with pancreatitis (22 November 1948 – 6 April 2020)

9/9 Tarvaris Jackson, 36

Former Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks and Buffalo Bills quarterback died in a car crash in Alabama (21 April 1983 – 12 April 2020)

A number of teammates and ex-colleagues have posted tributes on social media to Cronin. Ex-Raiders player Jordan Rapana, who played with Cronin, wrote: “Man I still don’t want to believe it! You got me through some of the toughest times of my life! I love you my brother, fly high you absolute legend, love you forever brother! Okioki teina… QUEENSLANDER!!!!”

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Coronavirus claims another major tech event: Kaspersky’s Security Analyst Summit postponed | ZDNet

Coronavirus: How hackers are exploiting the epidemic to steal your information
Karen Roby interviewed a cybersecurity expert about a different threat than COVID-19 brings.
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Kaspersky’s Security Analyst Summit (SAS) has been postponed due to fears surrounding the novel coronavirus outbreak. 

SAS2020 was due to open in 32 days, with attendees hitting the streets of Barcelona from April 6 – 9. The conference caters to thousands of security professionals, researchers, and members of both government agencies and law enforcement. There are talks revolving around new research and cybersecurity trends, cybersecurity roundtable discussions, and workshops.

Several weeks ago, ZDNet asked Kaspersky if there were any plans to cancel or postpone the summit due to the cancellation of GSMA’s Mobile World Congress (MWC) — also intended to take place in Barcelona — due to novel coronavirus concerns.

At the time, the cybersecurity firm said there were “no plans” to cancel SAS, but Kaspersky was “closely monitoring the situation.”

Now, it seems the decision has been made to postpone — not cancel — SAS for the “health and safety of all stakeholders.”

The reason given for the postponement resonates as a past attendee of SAS for some years. 

“We realized it won’t be “a real SAS” if we can’t share hugs, handshakes and beer glasses,” the company says. “We will do it properly when the time is right and everyone feels safe and comfortable.”

Kaspersky intends to go ahead with SAS during the September – November timeframe, but the cybersecurity firm has yet to decide on actual dates or places. For now, the SAS website has a placeholder date of September 1-1, Barcelona. 

Refund requests will be honored but Kaspersky added on a Twitter thread announcing the decision that “we would prefer if you keep your ticket and use it later this year :).”

Kaspersky’s Security Analyst Summit is the latest tech event to be impacted by the novel coronavirus outbreak. 

Also known as COVID-19, the respiratory illness has been confirmed in over 92,000 cases at the time of writing, claiming the lives of 3,200 people. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently said that the fatality rate of COVID-19 is 3.4%, higher than the seasonal flu, but is an illness that is not as easily transmitted. 

As travel bans surface, companies restrict international air travel, and large, public gatherings are scrapped on the side of caution, events are being canceled, postponed, or switched over to virtual, remote options instead. 

ZDNet’s Bill Detwiler has compiled a list of all the technology events facing disruption or cancellation due to COVD-19, which can be accessed here. Prominent events include Adobe Summit, Facebook F8, Microsoft MVP Global Summit, Nvidia GTC, and TNW. 

On Tuesday, Google I/O, the tech giant’s annual developer conference, was canceled. The event, due to take place at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California, will be replaced with a virtual option. Ticket holders will be refunded. 

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