The World’s First Batman Themed Restaurant Is Coming To London In The Spring – Sick Chirpse

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People are gearing up to be obsessed with Batman all over again in preparation for Robert Pattinson’s new movie next year and Wonderland Restaurants have decided to cash in on this by opening up the world’s first Batman themed restaurant in London this spring.

Featured Image VIA

The frankly quite enormous complex will be located inside the Crown Estate’s Grade 2 listed building on Brewer Street in Piccadilly Circus and will feature five different themed restaurants and three different bars, including The Iceberg Lounge – a bar inspired by The Penguin that features cocktails, live entertainment and an international menu – a Harley Quinn inspired restaurant and an Old Gotham City speakeasy that will serve cocktails and sharing platters. Diners can expect to spend about £45 for a meal which isn’t too bad considering it’s in London and one of these hip new immersive experiences that everyone seems to be interested in.

Here’s what Wonderland Restaurants founder James Bulmer had to say about his new venture:

Trends in our sector are moving towards fun, immersive and experiential dining and our aim is to demonstrate this on a grand scale with exceptional food and drink to match.

I am still a child at heart, inspired by the greatest stories and storytellers.

For me, great food experiences are about unlocking guests’ emotions and creating edible memories.

I mean that isn’t really telling us much about the Batman restaurant but I suppose it gives us some idea of his mentality or whatever. Probably gonna have to wait to hear some reviews/see some actual pictures before I decide whether or not I want to check it out. Could see some losers getting addicted to it though because there’s gonna be so many different places to visit there, it would take you like a whole week of going every day to do it properly. That’s a lot of time you could be spending there.

For more of the same, check out Robert Pattinson’s new Batman costume. Looks awesome.

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Best Facebook Games List 2020 – Facebook Instant Games

Games are a great way for us to relax our mind and ease stress. However, playing the right game when you are bored can go a long way to relief your mind and give you fun. Therefore, I understand that apart from chatting with friends and loved ones some Facebook users do seek interesting games to play. Furthermore, this is why I have crafted the entire best Facebook games list 2020 to help Facebook account holders to enjoy instant games online.

Best Facebook Games List 2020 – Facebook Instant Games

Therefore, if you have not tried playing Facebook instant games before, this is a good chance to do so. However, some Facebook users do not even know where they can find these games. Also, some Facebook account users do not know they can play games on the Facebook platform. Basically, apart from chatting on Facebook, uploading your pictures and videos you can as well look for interesting games to play.

Play Facebook Games with Friends– Facebook Gameroom

Playing games on Facebook is very fun as you can play Facebook games with friends. This really sounds interesting as apart from chatting with friends and making Facebook live videos you can as well play games with your Facebook friends. However, these make it more fun filling as you have the chance to your game scoreline with your friends.

How to Access Facebook Instant Games

Therefore, if you want to access the Facebook instant games platform just go through these steps below.

  1. Another list of features will then dropdown. Here you will see the Games Feature after Friends list. Click on it, it will then take you straight to the game room

All Best Facebook Games List 2020

Here are all the best Facebook Instant games you can play to keep you stress-free and will make you enjoy your day.

  • Soccer Football League
  • Kiss Sweety
  • Fifa 2019 Football
  • Soccer Penalty 2019
  • Playing Soccer
  • Fifa 2020 Football
  • Boxing Star
  • Penalty Shootout
  • Fatal Sniper
  • Golden Boot
  • Pro Evolution Soccer 2020
  • Cristiano Ronaldo Kick n Run.io
  • Foot Soccer
  • Bullet Fury
  • PUBG Mobile
  • Bb-tin-shooter
  • Toon Cup
  • Car Racing
  • First Kiss
  • Hill Climb Racing
  • Free Fire Battle Royal
  • Racing Moto Fast Speed
  • Spiderman ultimate
  • GTA City Theft GD
  • Car Racing Top Free Ride
  • Extreme Moto Winter
  • Archer Master
  • Field of Battle
  • Beso-kissing Game
  • Spiderman Stickman Jump
  • Moto Extreme Team
  • Mad Shark
  • Batman vs Superman
  • Stickman Warrior
  • Elite Sniper for Pubg 3D
  • Car Driving Simulator
  • Puppet Soccer Challenge
  • My Dream Wedding
  • Call of Duty Battleground
  • Pubg Kill enemies 3D
  • Shooter Zombies
  • Barbie’s & Ellie’s Doctor Game
  • Surgery Simulator
  • Hot Lip Kiss
  • My New Born Pet Baby
  • Disney Barbie’s Beach Swimsuit
  • Disney Barbie’s Crazy weekend
  • Adriana Hairstyle
  • Anna Theme Room Design
  • Nail Salon
  • Baby in Kitchen
  • Barbie Fashionista Dress up
  • Frozen Christmas Hairstyle
  • Ice Cream
  • Granny SpongeBob Evil
  • Rope Cut
  • Happy Glass
  • Chess
  • Spin the Bottle
  • Candy Crush
  • Train Snake
  • Push Block
  • Castle Defense
  • Trivia Crack
  • Snow Racing.io
  • Billiards Club Las Vegas
  • Garden Tales
  • Five in a Row
  • Trivia Quiz
  • Subway Surfers

The post Best Facebook Games List 2020 – Facebook Instant Games appeared first on Bingdroid.

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The Music in Pivotal Joker Scene Is by Notorious British Pedophile Gary Glitter

Does anyone at the Warner Bros. music department have access to Google?

The question arises after it emerged that a key scene in the studios hit new movie Joker, which opened Thursday for a record weekend, uses a famous track by Gary Glitter, a British pedophile currently rotting in jail, where he is serving a 16-year prison sentence for abusing three young girls.

Its not even Glitters first jail term; he served time in 2006 for molesting girls in Vietnam and was first jailed in 1999 after he was caught with images of child abuse.

While Glitter, real name Paul Gadd, may not be a household name in the U.S., he is one of the Britains most notorious hate-figures. The idea that his 1972 track Rock and Roll II could have been been included for a pivotal scene (in which Joaquin Phoenix descends an outdoor staircase as he completes his transformation into Batmans iconic foe) has shocked U.K. audiences.

With Joker grossing an estimated $93.5 million in ticket sales from 4,374 screens in North America this weekend, breaking the record for an October opening, Glitters royalty payment could leave him nicely set up for his release, which could come as soon as 2021 under British law.

Artists are usually paid a one-off synchronization fee when their songs are used on movie soundtracks, Ray Bush, managing director ofThe Music Royalty Co., told Yahoo News, It can range from 500 for smaller acts, up to 250,000-500,000, depending on the artist and the importance to the narrative of the film.

Some allegations against Glitter came to light 40 years after they occurred.

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At Least 2 Movie Theater Chains Ban Masks At ‘Joker’ Screenings

DENVER, Sept 26 (Reuters) – The Landmark Theaters chain will ban costumes and masks for moviegoers during screenings of the film “Joker,” it said on Thursday, following concerns expressed by families involved in a 2012 mass shooting during a Batman film in Colorado.

The Los Angeles-based chain, which runs 52 theaters in 27 markets, said it wanted customers to enjoy the film as a “cinematic achievement.”

“But no masks, painted faces or costumes will be permitted into our theaters,” it said in a statement to Reuters.

The film opens in theaters on Oct. 4.

Landmark joins the nation’s largest movie chain, Kansas-based AMC Theatres, which has banned masks in theaters since the Colorado massacre that killed a dozen and wounded scores, and re-affirmed that ban.

AMC, which runs more than 650 cinemas, reminded customers this week that while it allowed costumes, it did not allow masks.

“Guests are welcome to come dressed in costume, but we do not permit masks, face paint or any object that conceals the face,” it said in a statement widely reported in the media, including Variety.

Landmark did not give a reason for its ban.

But it follows a letter from the families of some victims of the shooting at a 2012 showing of the Batman movie, “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora, Colorado, to Warner Bros., the studio behind the “Joker,” expressing concern.

Some of those at the midnight screening in the packed Aurora theater had been wearing costumes. The mass shooting at the Century 16 Theater multiplex owned by Cinemark USA Inc killed 12 and wounded 70.

The gunman, James Holmes, is serving multiple life sentences after being convicted of mass murder, despite pleading not guilty by reason of insanity.

The new film depicts the mental breakdown of the Joker character, the nemesis of Batman in various movie, television and comic book adaptations, that leads to violence.

The families’ letter also urged Warner Bros. to end political contributions to candidates who take money from theNational Rifle Association and to fund gun violence intervention programs.

In response, Warner Bros. issued a statement of sympathy for the victims and their families, Entertainment Weekly said.

“Our company has a long history of donating to victims of violence, including Aurora, and in recent weeks, our parent company joined other business leaders to call on policymakers to enact bipartisan legislation to address this epidemic,” WarnerBros. said, media reported.

But the movie does not endorse real-world violence and does not hold up the Batman villain as a hero, it added.

Los Angeles police aim to step up visibility during the film’s opening weekend.

“The Los Angeles Police Department is aware of public concerns and the historical significance associated with the premiere of the Joker,” it said in a statement to Reuters.

“While there are no credible threats in the Los Angeles area, the department will maintain high visibility around movie theaters when it opens.”

Aurora police have said Cinemark will not screen “Joker” at the Colorado multiplex, where they continue to provide enhanced security.

“We recognize this release may cause concern for the families, friends, first responders and beyond,” police said in a statement on Wednesday.

(Reporting by Keith Coffman in Denver, and additional reporting by Rich McKay in Atlanta; Editing by Dan Whitcomb and Christian Schmollinger)

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‘The Lion King’ sinks its teeth into critic-audience divide

'The Lion King' sinks its teeth into critic-audience divide - CNN

(CNN)As “The Lion King” counts up receipts from a big opening weekend while still licking its wounds from negative reviews, you can almost hear the familiar murmurs — that critics are “out of step” with the audiences they profess to serve.

It’s a notion that contains a few crumbs of truth, but also a host of misconceptions.
At the risk of painting with too broad a brush, critics — simply by virtue of seeing so many productions in a particular field — are almost by definition a little out of step. Because they see everything (or as much as is humanly possible), they’re generally predisposed to look for that which is different, novel or otherwise distinctive.
That’s a difficult bar to achieve when remaking anything, especially an animated movie that’s essentially just being redone using a different animation technique. From that perspective, “The Lion King” is as much a consumer product as it is a movie.
    Why another “Lion King” some have asked, 25 years later? Because audiences often seek familiar experiences, especially when it means sharing a story with their kids. Whether it’s “Star Wars” or Batman, people who enjoyed those franchises in their youth not only tend to still like them, but relish the opportunity to share them with their kids.
    So is its success — with an estimated $185-million debut weekend in North America, a box-office feast fit for a you know what — a rebuke to critics, or at least, those who panned it, yielding tepid averages on review-aggregation sites? Not really.
    For starters, it’s always dicey inferring a connection between making a lot of money and quality. McDonald’s sells millions of burgers, but that doesn’t necessarily make them good for you, or worthy of a four-star rating.
    Second, it’s faulty to assume that critics who panned the movie were either rooting against it or felt their negative opinions would dissuade people inclined to see it.
    entertainment
    Indeed, the reality of modern criticism means writing about films and TV shows that are essentially review-proof, as well as showering praise (occasionally) on smaller projects with scant hope of garnering big crowds.
    There is, perhaps, an “old man yells at cloud” quality to lamenting the studios’ reliance on remakes, reboots and revivals, as some early reviews did. Disney made “The Lion King” for the same reason it did “Beauty and the Beast” and will do “The Little Mermaid” — not to ruin or raid your childhood, but because it thinks it can make a buck off of it. That’s hardly new, and as studios try to cut through the content clutter, even less likely to change.
    Viewed that way, it’s possible to accept and even enjoy the simplicity of something like this latest “Lion King” without seeing anything remotely exciting about it, and nothing wrong with trying to temper the expectations of those hoping to be wowed. In fact, critics unmoved by the experience would be remiss, and dishonest, if they didn’t.
    The best summation of this whole argument, frankly, came from Craig Mazin, the writer and producer of HBO’s “Chernobyl.” On Twitter, he responded to presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who veered out of his lane to opine that he found Disney’s live-action remakes of “The Lion King” “and other movies I grew up with a bit depressing. It’s like we can’t come up with new stories.”
    “Aladdin is about a thousand years old. Lion King is Hamlet,” Mazin wrote. “They weren’t so new when you saw them either. Let the kids enjoy.”
      The strong box-office results for “Aladdin” (whose reviews were also fairly tepid) and now “The Lion King” will only ensure that more remakes are pushed into the pipeline.
      Whether seeing such fare sounds appetizing is, of course, up to the individual consumer. For critics, by contrast, it’s usually just one of the mandatory groups in what can be an unhealthy movie-going diet.

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