Keyamo, lawmakers clash over planned 774,000 new jobs

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Hello and thank you for joining us on the mid-week edition of Journalists’ Hangout with Ayodele Ozugbakun, Babajide Kolade-Otitoju, while Sam Ibemere joins via Skype

Today on the programme… Keyamo, lawmakers clash over planned 774,000 new jobs, vows to quit if politicians hijack job slots, Buratai charges troops to take battle to bandits’ door, Governor Akeredolu orders his cabinet, close aides and others to do COVID-19 test, as Delta Governor and Wife test positive for coronavirus.

Later on the show, Journalists’ Hangout Midweek Special features pains of transport companies during lockdown and prospects after lifting of ban on inter-state movement.

Journalists hangout starts now.

#COVID19 #Lawmakers

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PwC Forecasts Higher Inflation Rate For Nigeria

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Pricewaterhouse Coopers(PwC) Nigeria has said that Nigeria’s inflation rate is likely to continue its upward trend for some time to come.

The firm made the prediction in its latest, “Nigeria Economic Alert” obtained by New Telegraph yesterday. Nigeria’s inflation rate rose for a ninth consecutive month to hit 12.40 per cent in May 2020 and several analysts have forecast that the upward trend will continue for the month of June.

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TVC News Nigeria Interview: Paolo Bray – Nigeria is highest exporter of Pangolin scales

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Nigeria is highest exporter of Pangolin scales – Cites
#Pangolin #Scales


Stop COVID-19 and prevent new pandemics by closing down wet markets selling illegally traded species

Every signature counts! http://chng.it/4gVSPRM2Vy

Help Friend of the Earth and Friend of the Sea to request governments, companies and populations involved in animal trade to close down wildlife wet markets selling illegaly traded endangered species.

Wet markets and slaughtered wildlife, such as pangolins and bats, are the probable origin of COVID-19 and other recent pandemics.

Make sure to support the mission and make a change by signing our free petition. Every signature counts! http://chng.it/4gVSPRM2Vy

Pangolins are endangered also because of the illegal trade of their scales. A pangolin is killed on average every 5 minutes by poachers. To stop this nonsense, please also sign our petition to save the pangolins. Sign here: http://chng.it/bPLLgW8G2G

Thank you for Your time.

Friend of the Earth – www.friendoftheearth.org
Friend of the Sea – www.friendofthesea.org

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Facebook staffers walk out saying Trump’s posts should be reined in | ABS-CBN News

Facebook employees walked away from their work-from-home desks on Monday and took to Twitter to accuse Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg of inadequately policing US President Donald Trump’s posts as strictly as the rival platform has done.

Reuters saw dozens of online posts from employees critical of Zuckerberg’s decision to leave Trump’s most inflammatory verbiage unchallenged where Twitter had labeled it. Some top managers participated in the protest, reminiscent of a 2018 walkout at Alphabet Inc’s Google over sexual harassment.

It was a rare case of staff publicly taking their CEO to task, with one employee tweeting that thousands participated. Among them were all seven engineers on the team maintaining the React code library which supports Facebook’s apps.

“Facebook’s recent decision to not act on posts that incite violence ignores other options to keep our community safe. We implore the Facebook leadership to #TakeAction,” they said in a joint statement published on Twitter.

“Mark is wrong, and I will endeavor in the loudest possible way to change his mind,” wrote Ryan Freitas, identified on Twitter as director of product design for Facebook’s News Feed. He added he had mobilized “50+ like-minded folks” to lobby for internal change.

A Facebook employee said Zuckerberg’s weekly Friday question-and-answer session would be moved up this week to Tuesday.

Katie Zhu, a product manager at Instagram, tweeted a screenshot showing she had entered “#BLACKLIVESMATTER” to describe her request for time off as part of the walkout.

Facebook Inc will allow employees participating in the protest to take the time off without drawing down their vacation days, spokesman Andy Stone said.

Separately, online therapy company Talkspace said it ended partnership discussions with Facebook. Talkspace CEO Oren Frank tweeted he would “not support a platform that incites violence, racism, and lies.”

SOCIAL JUSTICE

Tech workers at companies including Facebook, Google, and Amazon.com Inc have pursued social justice issues in recent years, urging the companies to change policies.

Employees “recognize the pain many of our people are feeling right now, especially our Black community,” Stone wrote in a text.

“We encourage employees to speak openly when they disagree with leadership. As we face additional difficult decisions around content ahead, we’ll continue seeking their honest feedback.”

Last week, nationwide unrest erupted after the death of a black man, George Floyd, in police custody in Minneapolis last Monday. Video footage showed a white officer kneeling on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes before he died.

On Friday, Twitter Inc affixed a warning label to a Trump tweet that included the phrase “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” Twitter said it violated rules against glorifying violence but was left up as a public interest exception.

Facebook declined to act on the same message, and Zuckerberg sought to distance his company from the fight between the president and Twitter.

On Friday, Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post that while he found Trump’s remarks “deeply offensive,” they did not violate company policy against incitements to violence and people should know whether the government was planning to deploy force.

Zuckerberg’s post also said Facebook had been in touch with the White House to explain its policies.

Jason Toff, a director of product management and former head of short-form video app Vine, was one of several Facebook employees organizing fundraisers for racial justice groups in Minnesota. Zuckerberg wrote on Facebook on Monday the company would contribute an additional $10 million to social justice causes.

Toff tweeted: “I work at Facebook and I am not proud of how we’re showing up. The majority of coworkers I’ve spoken to feel the same way. We are making our voice heard.” 

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Gulls, buckets and masturbation: a lighthouse keeper on The Lighthouse | Film | The Guardian

“God, I’m glad I never went to that one,” says Neil Hargreaves, as the closing credits of The Lighthouse roll. Neil is a former lighthouse keeper. I have brought him to see the film – centred around a 19th-century brick phallus on a godforsaken, storm-lashed rock off the coast of Maine – to get the insider’s view.

Actually, first I tried to take the film to him, to the cottage owned by Trinity House where he lives in Harwich, with a view from upstairs over the North Sea (tame today). But the DVD didn’t work, so he gave up his day and came back to London with me, to go to the cinema.

To be honest, I was a little apprehensive: what would Hargreaves – 73, old-school gent, proper polite – make of Robert Eggers’s nightmarish monochrome psychodrama? Of Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson going fabulously and terrifyingly insane in oilskins and knitwear? Of the flying semen, the unspeakable depths to which they plunge, all the way down to Davy Jones’s Locker? But he remains sanguine and stoic. “From a cinematic point of view, it was quite interesting,” he offers. “There is nothing entirely realistic about it.”

So, er, it doesn’t reflect his own experiences? “Oh no, no, no,” he says, quickly.

Hargreaves, originally from Lancashire, spent 16 years on lighthouses and lightships before taking voluntary redundancy in 1988 and becoming a security guard. He could see the end coming, with automation; since 1998, the UK has had no manned lighthouses.

His wildest, most remote posting was the Smalls Lighthouse, a granite tower perched on a rock 20 miles off the coast of Pembrokeshire, where he worked for two years – one month on, one month off, like in the film.

A key difference, though, was that there were three of them. That came about after an incident on the Smalls, a little before Hargreaves’s time in 1801, that changed lighthouse policy. It was before radio, he explains: the two keepers had no contact with the mainland and one of them died. “The other chap didn’t want the authorities to think he had bumped him off, so he kept him on the lighthouse, first inside the kitchen. Then, because they were overdue due to bad weather, he must have started to smell. So he took him out and lashed the body to the gallery round the outer part of the lantern. By the time the ship eventually got to him to relieve him, he had gone mad.”




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Hmm, a few echoes of the film there. After that, there were always three men on a lighthouse. “They were a good bunch of blokes,” says Hargreaves. “I made some good friends and I’m still friends with them. You got the odd one now and again, as you do anywhere, I suppose. The job did attract the odd loner, people who prefer their own company.”

Most keepers had hobbies; he knew a couple who knitted, like Pattinson’s character. Hargreaves made ships in bottles; yes, he spotted the one in the film, floating past in the drunken madness. The pisspot rang true, too; in the Smalls, it lived outside the shared bedroom halfway up the tower, by the window. “There was a streak down the side of the lighthouse,” he says. For poos, it was “bucket and chuck it” from the gallery.

Was there as much masturbation as in the film? “I suppose you’re only blokes, stuck out there a month at a time; some of that might have gone on.”

Did he ever feel like bumping anyone off? “It only happened to me once,” he says. At the Smalls, his first PK (principal keeper; a lighthouse had one principal and two assistants keepers) was an alcoholic. Lighthouses were dry, but this guy would be drunk going out “and you’d have to send him to his bed out of the way for the first two days”.

He was not the problem, though. When he was eventually sacked, it was his replacement who was the problem. “He was a bigot, a racist bigot. Homophobic as well. Watching TV, he would be cursing and moaning and going on about the … He was a real Alf Garnett, in spite of the fact that he knew my wife at the time was from the West Indies.”

Jesus, imagine being stuck on a lonely tower on the edge of the world with Alf Garnett! Instead of killing him, Hargreaves wrote to Trinity House and got himself transferred, to a platform on the North Sea where he spent seven years.

The gulls strike a nostalgic chord for Neil. There is one in the film who taps on the window with its beak, not in a friendly way, and it ends badly. Hargreaves never did that, but he remembers one they used to feed. It had only one leg and had to perform “a sort of crash landing”. He never saw, or did anything with, a mermaid. He did see a lot of lovely sunsets, though.

When Hargreaves left the job in 88, there were 174 keepers working. Many of them are no longer around. There will be a time, in the not too distant future, when there will be no one left who worked on a lighthouse. That is partly why he founded the Association of Lighthouse Keepers. “It wasn’t a job I wanted to walk away from and forget about.”

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Chris Okonkwo speaks on alleged Corruption in Power sector

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Workers of the Transmission Company of Nigeria have renewed their call for a review of the privatisation process of the electricity sector.

They however commended the agency’s management for relieving a former general manager of his duties two years after the expiration of his political office.

President-General, Senior Staff Association of Electricity and Allied Companies, Chris Okonkwo, to discuss the allegations of corruption against his union.

#Electricity #Corruption #TransmissionCompany

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Journalism without borders: why we are deepening our Europe coverage | World news | The Guardian

In the depth of the financial and economic crisis that was causing misery across much of southern Europe, particularly in 2011, I set off on a reporting trip that contained the germ of what, nearly a decade later, would find expression in This is Europe.

A significant new commitment to deepen the Guardian’s coverage of Europe, This is Europe is a new editorial strand aiming to explore the challenges confronting the continent, that respect no national borders, and how countries are responding to them.

Europe on the Breadline, a four-country road trip in search of some of the human stories behind the impersonal data of the eurozone crisis, took me from food banks and protest marches in Lisbon to the birth of a national citizens’ movement in Málaga.




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In Naples I met a youth worker whose projects with children in difficulty had been hammered by austerity; in Thessaloniki, a professor whose research budget had been slashed by 60% – and a young start-upper determined to succeed regardless.

That series, which led to a second one, this time confined to Greece, talking to those Greeks who were organising to help themselves, was an early attempt at the kind of transnational reporting implied in my current job title – and which This is Europe now aims to take a good deal further.

The whole idea of transnational reporting (journalisme sans frontières, anyone?) recognises that media organisations tend to report the EU from the institutions in Brussels, and from member states in isolation.

Only occasionally have we tried to make sense of issues across Europe – from the climate crisis to data security, migration to the rise of the far right, the working poor to caring for an ageing population, tax avoidance to the urban/rural divide.

It is an issue I have always been aware of, and tried to address before the paper created the role of roving Europe correspondent in 2016.

In 2013, I went back to Thessaloniki and Málaga – with a stop-off in Bologna – to talk to members of southern Europe’s “lost generation”: the 59%, 56% and 40% of under-25s who were then out of work in, respectively, Greece, Spain and in Italy.

In 2014 I made a tour of the populist, Eurosceptic and mainly far-right parties in France, Germany, the Netherlands and Finland that were looking to make major gains in the run-up to the European parliamentary elections of that year.

In 2015, we tried a different approach: for an article published on international labour day, 1 May, about workers taking over their factories, I reported from southern France and Greece, and Guardian colleagues contributed pieces from Spain and Turkey.

In similar efforts, for packages in 2018 and this year on the far-reaching impact of the rise of short-term rental platforms such as Airbnb, and overtourism in general, on Europe’s most historic cities, I wrote about Amsterdam and colleagues covered Berlin, Barcelona, Florence and Prague.




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But all of this has really only been a taster of what we could accomplish, and, over the past three years, my time – and that of many of our correspondents – has been massively taken up by Brexit, leaving precious little bandwidth to think of much else. This is Europe aims to rectify that.

Why is it transnational reporting important? Because it is only when you start comparing and contrasting how different countries are experiencing the same challenges, and how they are addressing them, that you start to see who is doing well, who has developed best practice.

It allows you, for example, to discover that perhaps surprisingly, Finland leads the way in tackling both fake news and homelessness. That France has a hugely successful consumers’ cooperative that is beginning to ensure farmers get paid a fair price for the food they produce.

And that while it may represent a potentially existential challenge to winemakers in Bordeaux, global heating represents a startling opportunity for their colleagues – and, in the not too distant future, rivals – in Scandinavia.

This is Europe: a new Guardian series

This is Europe is a new stream of Guardian journalism that investigates the big challenges that transcend national boundaries, and seeks out the solutions that could benefit us all. These are testing times, and crises are not limited by national borders. But then neither are we.

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Migration, climate, populism and contagious diseases are continent-wide problems. When we report on them through a pan-European lens, we not only understand the challenges better but can tease out solutions wherever they crop up: health in Denmark, for example, or teenage wellbeing in the Netherlands.

We’ve been talking about something similar to This is Europe for years at the Guardian, and now we’re doing it.

It’s a shame Brexit had to happen first, of course. But if we can now report Europe as Europe – as a continent rising (we hope) individually and collectively to the cross-border challenges it faces – more concretely and more informatively, that will be a small consolation.

Be part of the conversation. Sign up to the This is Europe email list to get a weekly selection of the most pressing stories and debates for Europeans – from identity to economics to the environment.

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‘My bears are my lifeline’: the adults who sleep with soft toys | Global | The Guardian

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If you share your bed with a furry friend well into adulthood, don’t be ashamed – sleeping with soft toys is more normal than you might think. “It’s very common,” says Prof Bruce Hood of the University of Bristol, who has researched our attachment to childhood toys. He tells me that about one in three of the people he has questioned still sleep with teddies, and that it is probably more common for women, as it is more socially acceptable for them to do so.

Why are we hanging on to our cuddly toys? “My hunch is that it’s to do with sleeping practices,” Hood says. In western cultures, we tend to separate children from their parents after the first year – after which they sleep on their own, and self-soothe using blankets and soft toys. “These become part of the sleep ritual.”

It is not unusual for your attachment to soft toys as a sleep aid to persist into adulthood. A survey carried out last year found that 44% of adults have held on to their childhood teddies and dolls, and as many as 34% of adults still sleep with a soft toy every night. Meanwhile, researchers at VU University Amsterdam found that cuddling a soft toy can have a beneficial effect for people with low self-esteem, helping to alleviate their anxieties around death.

“It’s about having a sentimental attachment to things,” Hood says. “It’s completely normal for adults to continue to have these childish attachments.”

He doesn’t see any harm in sleeping with a teddy, provided you’re not obsessive about it. “They provide emotional comfort.” Plus, it is more hygienic than sleeping with a pet. Just don’t forget to bung your teddy in the wash from time to time.

We spoke to three Guardian readers about their furry friends.

Jeff Annells, 68
Receptionist from Banbury




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It all started when my uncle won me a big old bear called Brumas, when I was about five. He was named after the famous polar bear who was born into captivity at London zoo. I used to cart Brumas everywhere with me – until one day his head fell off. That sounds very traumatic, but it wasn’t that bad.

When I grew up, I started collecting teddy bears. I have about 60 Steiff and Charlie Bears. I pass out thinking about how much money I’ve spent on them – probably £20,000 over my lifetime.

My favourite bear is a 6ft-tall Charlie bear that I call Big Fella. He’s one of only 100 made worldwide. He cost me about £3,000. Everyone who comes to my house gets a photo with Big Fella. He stands in my corridor. When I was diagnosed with stage four prostate cancer in 2014, Big Fella came into his own. Having cancer is like living in a parallel universe. Everyone is going about their business and you have this thing hanging over you. You never get a break from cancer.

I’m often in a lot of pain. No matter how bad the pain is, I always say good morning to Big Fella when I wake up. My bears are my lifeline. I can say anything to them. I wake up and say: “Christ, I’m in agony this morning.” No one else needs to know that. I say it to Big Fella, and then I get myself ready and go to work and sit on reception smiling at everyone. They’re none the wiser.

I worry a lot about who will inherit Big Fella if I pop my clogs. I keep threatening people with it, saying: “I’ve left you Big Fella in my will.” A look of horror appears on their faces. Seriously, though, I would love for Big Fella to go a children’s hospice. I like the idea of the children being able to confide in him, like I have.

Emily Dove, 26
Personal assistant from Leeds




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I got Ted as a present for my 18th birthday from my auntie. He’s a brown teddy bear, about 12 inches tall. I have other soft toys that sit on top of my wardrobe. But Ted is the one who hangs out in my bed and comes with me when I go on holiday.

Ted and I have been to Glastonbury together six times. He normally stays in my sleeping bag. It’s nice to be able to get back to the tent late at night and have a cuddle, especially when it’s quite cold. Last year, going into Glastonbury, Ted got properly searched – I think security thought he was a drug mule! They gave him a good squeeze. Luckily, he didn’t get picked apart or anything like that.

A big part of my love for Ted is that I find it very comforting to cuddle him when I’m going to sleep. He’s been a big part of my bedtime routine for the past nine years. I just like having something to cuddle. I need to have something soft to hold by my body. Recently, I went to London for a few days, and I forgot Ted, so I had to cuddle a pillow instead. It wasn’t the same.

I haven’t had any bad feedback from partners. If they did say anything, I’d say that it’s Ted’s bed as well! I think everyone should have a soft toy of their own. It’s a constant, comforting presence in your life. And if you have a relationship and it ends, at least you still have a teddy to cuddle.

Chris Kirton, 33
Call-centre worker from Sunderland




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My girlfriend, Becky, got me into soft toys. She’s a huge soft toy fan – I’m always buying her birthday or Christmas presents from Build-a-Bear Workshop. I spend a fortune in there! When she moves in with me next year I think my spare bedroom will become a bear sanctuary.

There is so much pressure on us all to be adults, and it’s not always the nicest world to live in. It’s nice to forget about your worries for a little while and be a child again.

I bought Squishy for myself from Morrisons last year. He is your classic teddy bear. I bought him as a bit of a joke, initially.

When I’m at home on my own, I’ll talk out loud to Squishy. Just general stuff, like: “What am I going to do today, then?” It’s just a bit of fun. If I’m watching TV or texting people, I’ll have Squishy under one arm.

I enjoy the absurdity of talking to my teddy bear. My job is often very stressful – I’m always having to apologise when I’ve done nothing wrong, and deal with angry, rude customers. After a tough day at work, I can get home and be daft for a few minutes. It takes my mind off things.

Becky and I had been thinking about getting a pet, but I didn’t want to leave an animal unattended at home. Having soft toys gives you some of the comfort of an animal, without the responsibilities associated with it.

Additional reporting by Rachel Obordo

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Coronavirus claims another major tech event: Kaspersky’s Security Analyst Summit postponed | ZDNet

Coronavirus: How hackers are exploiting the epidemic to steal your information
Karen Roby interviewed a cybersecurity expert about a different threat than COVID-19 brings.
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Kaspersky’s Security Analyst Summit (SAS) has been postponed due to fears surrounding the novel coronavirus outbreak. 

SAS2020 was due to open in 32 days, with attendees hitting the streets of Barcelona from April 6 – 9. The conference caters to thousands of security professionals, researchers, and members of both government agencies and law enforcement. There are talks revolving around new research and cybersecurity trends, cybersecurity roundtable discussions, and workshops.

Several weeks ago, ZDNet asked Kaspersky if there were any plans to cancel or postpone the summit due to the cancellation of GSMA’s Mobile World Congress (MWC) — also intended to take place in Barcelona — due to novel coronavirus concerns.

At the time, the cybersecurity firm said there were “no plans” to cancel SAS, but Kaspersky was “closely monitoring the situation.”

Now, it seems the decision has been made to postpone — not cancel — SAS for the “health and safety of all stakeholders.”

The reason given for the postponement resonates as a past attendee of SAS for some years. 

“We realized it won’t be “a real SAS” if we can’t share hugs, handshakes and beer glasses,” the company says. “We will do it properly when the time is right and everyone feels safe and comfortable.”

Kaspersky intends to go ahead with SAS during the September – November timeframe, but the cybersecurity firm has yet to decide on actual dates or places. For now, the SAS website has a placeholder date of September 1-1, Barcelona. 

Refund requests will be honored but Kaspersky added on a Twitter thread announcing the decision that “we would prefer if you keep your ticket and use it later this year :).”

Kaspersky’s Security Analyst Summit is the latest tech event to be impacted by the novel coronavirus outbreak. 

Also known as COVID-19, the respiratory illness has been confirmed in over 92,000 cases at the time of writing, claiming the lives of 3,200 people. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently said that the fatality rate of COVID-19 is 3.4%, higher than the seasonal flu, but is an illness that is not as easily transmitted. 

As travel bans surface, companies restrict international air travel, and large, public gatherings are scrapped on the side of caution, events are being canceled, postponed, or switched over to virtual, remote options instead. 

ZDNet’s Bill Detwiler has compiled a list of all the technology events facing disruption or cancellation due to COVD-19, which can be accessed here. Prominent events include Adobe Summit, Facebook F8, Microsoft MVP Global Summit, Nvidia GTC, and TNW. 

On Tuesday, Google I/O, the tech giant’s annual developer conference, was canceled. The event, due to take place at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California, will be replaced with a virtual option. Ticket holders will be refunded. 

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4 reasons you must embrace push notifications to increase revenue – Best in Australia

Photo: Cristian Dina, Pexels.

You think of expanding your business, suddenly one idea sparks in your mind and that is none other than the mobile app technology and you want to adapt it since you want your business to excel and you don’t want a single stone to remain unturned for the sake of your success. 

But after getting a mobile app you realize that it is turning out to be a hard task for you to retain users.

When the question of app’s success comes the very segment which describes the success of a mobile app is the number of active users on your mobile app, and something which takes this journey one step ahead is the app retention on your mobile app. 

Push notifications can be a tool for the user retention, but only if you decided to proceed with certain tactics, which are mentioned herewith in this blog. Let’s read ahead and experience the difference

App retention is one of the greatest concerns every app has to deal with and needs to find out the best ways out of it in order to make your app survive the app chaos elegantly. 

Indeed there are certain aspects which must be integrated into the app during the app development process, so the app can fit in the requirements of the business and falls as an absolute fit for the users’ expectations as well.

But with so many features, functionalities, it gets more confusing for the app owners to pick the right strategy for the mobile app, which can help the mobile app from getting doomed, so to avoid the cloud of confusion, we have brought this post today, which clearly speaks that how a simple feature in your app, can help your mobile app to survive the game of the app retention…this feature is none other than the Push Notification.

Motivates users to buy products

When a customer plans to buy something from your app, but adds them in the cart and forgets to buy the product, in such scenario when you send a push notification reminder to your targeted audience so they can complete their purchase.

So with a help of simple push notification, you trigger your audience and help them to stay hooked to your services only.

Offers personalized notification

Your users have a different choices, and the different demand from the users, often lead the users to visit the competitor’s mobile app, since they feel the existing app doesn’t have anything new to serve them, so with a push notification you can easily eradicate this possibility by continuously updating your users, about any new feature or the new update which would suit their taste.

With this, you would help your users to stay engaged with your mobile app only and you can experience a much-engaging user experience.

Works on users’ psychology

When you wake up in the morning, and find a notification on your mobile app, telling you the weather forecast, you would definitely feel touched and would start to notice the app. 

This same strategy is integrated by the Facebook as well, wherein on opening the app or the web page in the morning, you are notified by a beautiful message, which states, Hi XXX, today weather will remain clear in Australia, you can enjoy the sunshine!!!, these small notifications which stay on top of your mobile app, keep reminding the users to about your app.

Now the question comes, that how to make the push notification a successful strategy???

Unfortunately push notification can be a deal-breaker or the maker for your app if you skip following the rules. The rules are quite simple and state:

Keep the content simple

When you decide to proceed further with the push notification then you must remember that your users don’t have much time to understand and act on your notification, so the very first strategy suggests, that more your content would be simple, more it would be preferred by the users. So keep the notification content simple yet engaging with some magic words, like ‘ Grab the deal’ or ‘ (name) you should not miss this deal’, by integrating the words like this, you would allow your users to use your app.

Push platform

The selection of the right platform to send the push platform is also mandatory for the successful push notification strategy. There are many push platforms in the market, such as PushWoosh and Parse to name a few, but you need to pick the most appropriate option as per your business needs.

Notifications must have the frequency

You need to understand a very common and most significant fact, that every user has a personal life as well, and you cannot disturb it with your push messages, so you need to understand that your push notification must not turn out to be an irritating factor for your mobile app, so by keeping this in mind you must set a frequency of your push messages.

Switch on/off option

When it comes to push notification, the more you allow your users to use it as per their convenience they would prefer to use it further. To make this happen, you must let the On/Off option in your mobile app, which would allow the users to set the notification-receiving as per their convenience.

Indeed push-notifications can help your mobile app to retain the users, but only if it is planned and managed with the right strategies to yield the best result out of it and can help you to make your app development a cherishing experience for your business goals.

Also, one another fact which equally matters in the success of a mobile app, and cannot be given a miss at any given cost, is the selection of the right mobile app development company for your app.

I know there are many app development companies in the app development market, and which keep on confusing you further, but you need to be sure of picking a right app development partner, which has the impressive technical experience and the technical exposure to handle your app requirements effortlessly.

If you are finding it hard to find such company for your app concept, then you must get in touch with experienced app builder such as Techugo, which has every bit of these requirements coupled with the renowned clientele list, and help your app to grow immensely.

Jason is a senior Android developer in Australia. He holds great expertise in latest and advanced Android technologies, and ensures to integrate his skills into the mobile app development process.

What do you think about it?

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