Chemical Workers React As Company Sack Over 200 Workers

The Nigerian Union of Chemical Workers says it will continue to protest at NYCIL headquarters in Lagos for the sack of over 200 workers after working actively during the pandemic.
#NYCIL

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TVC News partners INNOSON motors to boost local patronage

TVC Commuications and Innoson Vehicle Manufacturing Company limited, Nigeria’s leading automobile brand have sealed a partnership to expand market penetration and showcase its quality to Nigerians.

CEO of TVC Communications, Andrew Hanlon played host to the management of IVM in Lagos stressing on the need for improved patronage of made in Nigeria products and pledges support to drive this initiative .

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Christian pastor and pregnant wife killed in Nigeria | SW News | 126

Boko Haram attack on village leaves 81 people dead
The Islamic militant group Boko Haram is thought to be responsible for an attack upon a Nigerian village that has left at least 81 people dead. The fatal raid upon the village of Faduma Kolomdi, in the north eastern state of Borno, took place on Tuesday morning.

Protestant pastor and wife gunned down by militants
Meanwhile, last week saw a protestant pastor and his wife also become victims of anti-Christian violence in Nigeria. The Reverend Emmanuel Saba Bileya and his wife, Juliana, who is thought to have been pregnant, were gunned down on Monday June 1 while working on their farm in the Taraba State in north-east Nigeria.

The Vatican has announced that there will be no outdoor Eucharistic procession during this Sunday’s celebration of the Feast of Corpus Christi. That’s due, they say, to COVID-19 restrictions. Instead, Pope Francis will lead solemn benediction of the Blessed Sacrament within St. Peter’s Basilica following Sunday Mass.

Bishop Egan: Proposed abortion laws “fundamentally detestable”
The Bishop of Portsmouth in England is urging both Catholics and all people of goodwill on the Channel Island of Guernsey to take a stand against proposed new abortion laws which he describes as “fundamentally detestable”. The new laws would seek to raise the time limit for abortion on Guernsey from 12 weeks to 24 weeks.

Pope Francis creates new COVID-19 recovery fund
Pope Francis has established a new charitable fund to help those within the Diocese of Rome who are facing financial hardship or have lost their job due to the Covid-19 crisis. Entitled the “Jesus the Divine Worker Fund” it will initially have an endowment of one million Euros.

Primate of All Ireland welcomes return of public Masses
The Primate of All Ireland is welcoming the news that churches are to reopen in the Republic of Ireland later this month. Following a drop in the number of COVID-19 cases, the Irish Prime Minister or Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar, has announced that places of worship can re-open on June 29th.

The Diocese of Beaumont gets a new bishop
The Diocese of Beaumont in Texas has a new bishop. He’s Monsignor David Toups who is current the rector of the St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Florida’s Boynton Beach. He’ll succeed Bishop Curtis Guillory who has served as bishop of Beaumont for the past 20 years. 49-year-old Monsignor Toups grew up in Louisiana.

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Facebook deactivates accounts of Tunisian political bloggers and activists | Global development | The Guardian

The Facebook accounts of several high-profile bloggers and activists in Tunisia were among those deactivated without warning over the weekend.

Up to 60 accounts are understood to have been deactivated, including that of journalist and political commentator Haythem El Mekki.

At least 14 accounts have since been restored, but no explanation has been given for the action by the social media giant.

“They received no warning, no advance notice and still have no explanation,” said Emna Mizouni, an activist and journalist who campaigns for an open internet. “In the end we were able to get 14 restored by going to [the anti-corruption watchdog] IWatch … but know nothing about the rest.”

Facebook use is high in Tunisia, with many people crediting the platform for providing a rallying point for activists and bloggers during the country’s 2011 revolution that overthrew Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali.

“In Tunisia, the internet equals Facebook,” said Mizouni. “It was a really important tool during the revolution. We used it to organise events and share videos of what was happening across the country.”

After cementing itself at the centre of much of Tunisia’s public conversation, politicians and ministries use Facebook to communicate directly with the people. According to online advocacy group AccessNow, around 60% of Tunisian are Facebook users, one of the highest uptakes of the platform within the region.

El Mekki first became aware that his account had been deactivated last Friday. “It just said that my account had been deactivated and that was my final notice,” he said. “There wasn’t really any negotiation.”

Given his high profile and occasionally incendiary comments, El Mekki is not a stranger to controversy. However, having his account arbitrarily deactivated came as a surprise.

“I still don’t know what happened,” he said. “It would be flattering to believe that we had been targeted, but I think it’s just as likely that an algorithm got out of control.”

Whatever the causes, over the past nine years the country’s relationship with Facebook has changed. “I think one of the main dangers is that it’s not transparent to Tunisians,” said Mizouni. “For instance, during last year’s elections, we were unable to find out who was paying for what political adverts and why, despite several requests from NGOs to do so.”

Facebook did eventually respond to the NGOs’ requests some months later, although its letter failed to address the specific concerns raised. 

The Guardian contacted Facebook about the deactivated accounts and the company said it was investigating. 

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Facebook staffers walk out saying Trump’s posts should be reined in | ABS-CBN News

Facebook employees walked away from their work-from-home desks on Monday and took to Twitter to accuse Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg of inadequately policing US President Donald Trump’s posts as strictly as the rival platform has done.

Reuters saw dozens of online posts from employees critical of Zuckerberg’s decision to leave Trump’s most inflammatory verbiage unchallenged where Twitter had labeled it. Some top managers participated in the protest, reminiscent of a 2018 walkout at Alphabet Inc’s Google over sexual harassment.

It was a rare case of staff publicly taking their CEO to task, with one employee tweeting that thousands participated. Among them were all seven engineers on the team maintaining the React code library which supports Facebook’s apps.

“Facebook’s recent decision to not act on posts that incite violence ignores other options to keep our community safe. We implore the Facebook leadership to #TakeAction,” they said in a joint statement published on Twitter.

“Mark is wrong, and I will endeavor in the loudest possible way to change his mind,” wrote Ryan Freitas, identified on Twitter as director of product design for Facebook’s News Feed. He added he had mobilized “50+ like-minded folks” to lobby for internal change.

A Facebook employee said Zuckerberg’s weekly Friday question-and-answer session would be moved up this week to Tuesday.

Katie Zhu, a product manager at Instagram, tweeted a screenshot showing she had entered “#BLACKLIVESMATTER” to describe her request for time off as part of the walkout.

Facebook Inc will allow employees participating in the protest to take the time off without drawing down their vacation days, spokesman Andy Stone said.

Separately, online therapy company Talkspace said it ended partnership discussions with Facebook. Talkspace CEO Oren Frank tweeted he would “not support a platform that incites violence, racism, and lies.”

SOCIAL JUSTICE

Tech workers at companies including Facebook, Google, and Amazon.com Inc have pursued social justice issues in recent years, urging the companies to change policies.

Employees “recognize the pain many of our people are feeling right now, especially our Black community,” Stone wrote in a text.

“We encourage employees to speak openly when they disagree with leadership. As we face additional difficult decisions around content ahead, we’ll continue seeking their honest feedback.”

Last week, nationwide unrest erupted after the death of a black man, George Floyd, in police custody in Minneapolis last Monday. Video footage showed a white officer kneeling on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes before he died.

On Friday, Twitter Inc affixed a warning label to a Trump tweet that included the phrase “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” Twitter said it violated rules against glorifying violence but was left up as a public interest exception.

Facebook declined to act on the same message, and Zuckerberg sought to distance his company from the fight between the president and Twitter.

On Friday, Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post that while he found Trump’s remarks “deeply offensive,” they did not violate company policy against incitements to violence and people should know whether the government was planning to deploy force.

Zuckerberg’s post also said Facebook had been in touch with the White House to explain its policies.

Jason Toff, a director of product management and former head of short-form video app Vine, was one of several Facebook employees organizing fundraisers for racial justice groups in Minnesota. Zuckerberg wrote on Facebook on Monday the company would contribute an additional $10 million to social justice causes.

Toff tweeted: “I work at Facebook and I am not proud of how we’re showing up. The majority of coworkers I’ve spoken to feel the same way. We are making our voice heard.” 

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Gulls, buckets and masturbation: a lighthouse keeper on The Lighthouse | Film | The Guardian

“God, I’m glad I never went to that one,” says Neil Hargreaves, as the closing credits of The Lighthouse roll. Neil is a former lighthouse keeper. I have brought him to see the film – centred around a 19th-century brick phallus on a godforsaken, storm-lashed rock off the coast of Maine – to get the insider’s view.

Actually, first I tried to take the film to him, to the cottage owned by Trinity House where he lives in Harwich, with a view from upstairs over the North Sea (tame today). But the DVD didn’t work, so he gave up his day and came back to London with me, to go to the cinema.

To be honest, I was a little apprehensive: what would Hargreaves – 73, old-school gent, proper polite – make of Robert Eggers’s nightmarish monochrome psychodrama? Of Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson going fabulously and terrifyingly insane in oilskins and knitwear? Of the flying semen, the unspeakable depths to which they plunge, all the way down to Davy Jones’s Locker? But he remains sanguine and stoic. “From a cinematic point of view, it was quite interesting,” he offers. “There is nothing entirely realistic about it.”

So, er, it doesn’t reflect his own experiences? “Oh no, no, no,” he says, quickly.

Hargreaves, originally from Lancashire, spent 16 years on lighthouses and lightships before taking voluntary redundancy in 1988 and becoming a security guard. He could see the end coming, with automation; since 1998, the UK has had no manned lighthouses.

His wildest, most remote posting was the Smalls Lighthouse, a granite tower perched on a rock 20 miles off the coast of Pembrokeshire, where he worked for two years – one month on, one month off, like in the film.

A key difference, though, was that there were three of them. That came about after an incident on the Smalls, a little before Hargreaves’s time in 1801, that changed lighthouse policy. It was before radio, he explains: the two keepers had no contact with the mainland and one of them died. “The other chap didn’t want the authorities to think he had bumped him off, so he kept him on the lighthouse, first inside the kitchen. Then, because they were overdue due to bad weather, he must have started to smell. So he took him out and lashed the body to the gallery round the outer part of the lantern. By the time the ship eventually got to him to relieve him, he had gone mad.”




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Hmm, a few echoes of the film there. After that, there were always three men on a lighthouse. “They were a good bunch of blokes,” says Hargreaves. “I made some good friends and I’m still friends with them. You got the odd one now and again, as you do anywhere, I suppose. The job did attract the odd loner, people who prefer their own company.”

Most keepers had hobbies; he knew a couple who knitted, like Pattinson’s character. Hargreaves made ships in bottles; yes, he spotted the one in the film, floating past in the drunken madness. The pisspot rang true, too; in the Smalls, it lived outside the shared bedroom halfway up the tower, by the window. “There was a streak down the side of the lighthouse,” he says. For poos, it was “bucket and chuck it” from the gallery.

Was there as much masturbation as in the film? “I suppose you’re only blokes, stuck out there a month at a time; some of that might have gone on.”

Did he ever feel like bumping anyone off? “It only happened to me once,” he says. At the Smalls, his first PK (principal keeper; a lighthouse had one principal and two assistants keepers) was an alcoholic. Lighthouses were dry, but this guy would be drunk going out “and you’d have to send him to his bed out of the way for the first two days”.

He was not the problem, though. When he was eventually sacked, it was his replacement who was the problem. “He was a bigot, a racist bigot. Homophobic as well. Watching TV, he would be cursing and moaning and going on about the … He was a real Alf Garnett, in spite of the fact that he knew my wife at the time was from the West Indies.”

Jesus, imagine being stuck on a lonely tower on the edge of the world with Alf Garnett! Instead of killing him, Hargreaves wrote to Trinity House and got himself transferred, to a platform on the North Sea where he spent seven years.

The gulls strike a nostalgic chord for Neil. There is one in the film who taps on the window with its beak, not in a friendly way, and it ends badly. Hargreaves never did that, but he remembers one they used to feed. It had only one leg and had to perform “a sort of crash landing”. He never saw, or did anything with, a mermaid. He did see a lot of lovely sunsets, though.

When Hargreaves left the job in 88, there were 174 keepers working. Many of them are no longer around. There will be a time, in the not too distant future, when there will be no one left who worked on a lighthouse. That is partly why he founded the Association of Lighthouse Keepers. “It wasn’t a job I wanted to walk away from and forget about.”

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Minneapolis death of George Floyd: Protests escalate; Trump vs Twitter

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Minneapolis protests escalate as police precinct set on fire, CNN reporter arrested; Trump lashes out at looters on Twitter: What we know

Ryan W. Miller, Jordan Culver, Joel Shannon and Erick Smith
USA TODAY
Published 7:45 AM EDT May 29, 2020

A Minneapolis police precinct was torched late Thursday night as protests intensified following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody this week after a white officer pinned him to the ground under his knee.

Amid the escalating violence, President Donald Trump criticized the city’s mayor and called protesters “thugs.” Twitter later put a public interest notice on that tweet.

Elsewhere in the deeply shaken city, thousands of peaceful demonstrators marched through the streets calling for justice.

There were protests and rallies across the country, too – including New York City, Chicago and Denver. In Louisville, Kentucky, a protest to demand justice for Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old Louisville ER tech shot and killed by police in March, turned violent. Seven people were shot.

Here’s what we know Friday:

State police, national guard clear streets Friday morning

Early Friday, patrols of local and state police and the national guard were clearing the streets around Minneapolis Police’s 3rd Precinct as smoke from the overnight fires billowed.

Video of police and the guard in riot gear and with shields were seen holding lines and marching through the street to push people back.

The heavy police presence came after hours of protests and looting overnight during which little to no police were seen in Minneapolis.

CNN reporter and crew arrested

A CNN reporter and crew were arrested early Friday as state police advanced down a street near the 3rd Precinct.

Correspondent Omar Jimenez was reporting live on “New Day” when police advanced toward him and his crew. Jimenez told police that he was a reporter, showed his credentials and asked where they would like him and the crew to stand so they could continue reporting and be out of their way.

“Put us back where you want us. We are getting out of your way,” Jimenez said. “Wherever you want us, we will go. We were just getting out of your way when you were advancing through the intersection.”

A response by police could not be heard as Jimenez explained the scene. An officer then told Jimenez he was under arrest. Jimenez asked why he was under arrest, but was taken from the scene. The rest of the crew was then arrested as the live shot continued with the camera on the ground.

CNN said later Friday that Jimenez had been released and that Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz apologized for his arrest.

George Floyd video adds to trauma: ‘When is the last time you saw a white person killed online?’

Fires, protesters overtake 3rd precinct

Hours after hundreds of protesters flooded Minneapolis streets – shouting “I can’t breathe” and “no justice, no peace; prosecute the police” – a group of demonstrators overran MPD’s 3rd Precinct, setting “several fires” and forcing officers to evacuate “in the interest of the safety,” according to a police statement.

Protesters celebrated – cheering, honking car horns and setting off fireworks – as fires scorched at the precinct. For hours, police ceded the area to the protesters as windows were smashed, fires lit and buildings looted.

Protesters could be seen setting fire to a Minneapolis Police Department jacket, according to the Associated Press.

Video from Minnesota Public Radio reporter Max Nesterak shared on Twitter showed large crowds around the precinct with rubble and debris thrown about. Nesterak tweeted that Postal Service vehicles were being hijacked.

Follow the George Floyd story: Get USA TODAY’s Daily Briefing in your inbox

Trump calls Mayor Jacob Frey ‘weak,’ Twitter responds with notice

As the city was erupting, President Donald Trump lashed out on Twitter, calling the city’s mayor “very weak” and saying that “thugs are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd.” 

In a tweet just before 1 a.m. ET, Trump said he couldn’t “stand back & watch this happen to a great American City.”

“A total lack of leadership,” Trump tweeted. “Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right.”

Twitter later put a public interest notice on that tweet.

“This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules about glorifying violence. However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public’s interest for the Tweet to remain accessible,” the social media company posted.

Trump’s social media order: Rule means agencies can review whether Twitter, Facebook can be sued for content

National Guard activated

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz earlier Thursday activated the National Guard at the Minneapolis mayor’s request. The Guard tweeted minutes after the precinct burned that it had activated more than 500 soldiers across the metro area.

Photos and video on social media showed the National Guard moving through the streets around the precinct early Friday.

Target closes 24 stores in Minneapolis-St. Paul area ‘until further notice’ 

After multiple videos of looters causing chaos inside a Target store circulated on social media Wednesday night, the Minneapolis-based retailers on Thursday announced closures for 24 of its stores in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. 

All of the closures are “until further notice,” Target said in a statement. 

“We are heartbroken by the death of George Floyd and the pain it is causing our community,” the company said. “At this time, we have made the decision to close a number of our stores until further notice. Our focus will remain on our team members’ safety and helping our community heal.”

Earlier Thursday, dozens of businesses across the Twin Cities boarded up their windows and doors in an effort to prevent looting.

Minneapolis police at center of George Floyd’s death had a history of complaints

Derek Chauvin, the officer fired for kneeling on Floyd’s neck, and officer Tou Thao, who is seen on the video of Floyd’s arrest standing by, have histories of complaints from the public.

Since December 2012, the officers drew a combined 13 complaints. Minneapolis settled at least one lawsuit against Thao. Since 2006, Chauvin has been reviewed for three shootings. 

They were repeatedly accused of treating victims of crimes with callousness or indifference, failing to file a report when a crime was alleged and, in at least one case, using an unnecessary amount of force in making an arrest.

– Kelley Benham French, Kevin Crowe and Katie Wedell

More news on the police death of George Floyd

How did we get here: What happened to George Floyd

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was pinned down by a white police officer who held his knee to Floyd’s neck. The incident was recorded on cellphone video that went viral, sparking outrage nationwide.

Floyd died after pleading with officer Derek Chauvin to remove his knee from Floyd’s neck while police were investigating the use of a counterfeit bill at a corner store. Chauvin and the three others officers involved were fired Tuesday.

– Tyler J. Davis

Rev. Jesse Jackson calls for nationwide protests

“The protests must continue, but around the country … protest until something happens,” the Rev. Jesse Jackson said in a visit to Minneapolis, where he called for murder charges over Floyd’s death. He said protests should respect social distancing protocols to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

The Rev. Al Sharpton and Gwen Carr, the mother of Eric Garner who was killed by an NYPD officer, also came to Minneapolis to speak to protesters. 

Protesters should continue to take action until charges are announced, Jackson said. He said black people have been “brutalized without consequence” for decades. 

– Tyler J. Davis

State and federal authorities promise to investigate Floyd’s death

“That video is graphic and horrific and terrible and no person should do that,” Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said at a press conference. He said investigators needed time to determine if the video showed a criminal offense: “We have to do this right.”

Investigators took an unusual step in announcing an in-progress federal investigation, U.S. Attorney Erica MacDonald said. She joined Freeman and other officials in offering condolences to Floyd’s family and pleading for peaceful protests.

Calling Floyd’s death a “disturbing” loss of life, MacDonald promised a “a robust and meticulous investigation” and said the Department of Justice is making the case a “top priority.”

Contributing: Associated Press; Trevor Hughes, Cara Richardson and Steve Kiggins, USA TODAY.

Read more about George Floyd, the shooting and other news

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N3bn to be moved from TCN- Joe Ajaero

Last week, President Buhari approved the sack of the managing director of Transmission Company of Nigeria, Usman Guru Mohammed and appointed Sule Ahmed Abdulaziz as acting managing director.
A statement by the minister of power, Mr Saleh Mamman did not give specific reason for the removal of Mohammed.

#TCN #Revenue #SalehMamman #PowerSector #MinisterofPower

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Covid-19: Flour Mills Spends $1.5Million On Medical Equipment, Donates N1.5 Billion To Nigeria

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Since the COVID-19 pandemic became a reality in Nigeria, it became imperative for the private sector to get involved and support the govt/people. In response to this, Flour as activated an action plan. We have the Company secretary, Joseph Umuolu, with us on #YourViewTVC

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Skyway Capital on TVC Breakfast TVC News Nigeria HQ

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Skyway Capital on TVC Breakfast TVC News Nigeria HQ
SKYWAY TECHNOLOGIES COMPANY specializes in revolutionary high-speed elevated rail transportation.
SkyWay Capital is offering pre-IPO share allotments at 4 cents/share (N14/share).
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If you buy now, your equity at IPO is guaranteed 1 Dollar/share (N364/share) – that is 260% return on investment (ROI).
Afterwards you become entitled to a quarterly dividends as a co-owner/shareholder.
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SkyWay Capital will soon be listed on London Stock Exchange.
There are 15 stages before the IPO and listing on LSE (London Stock Exchange). We are currently at stage 14.1.
Their websites: SkyWay.Capital, rsw-systems.com, sw-tech.by.
Search for more info on YouTube: SkyWay Capital.
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To invest, contact: Dr. Etemi Joshua Garba (+234 803 694 3881).

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