Man cancels wedding a day to wedding after bride-to-be cheated

A man has reportedly canceled wedding plans a day before the d-day after he found out that his bride-to-be cheated on him few months ago.

According to the report by a Facebook user identified as Sandra Ibeh, the man was in the know a day after the infidelity incident but he kept mum until a day before the wedding.

The lady, who claimed to be close to the man wrote on Facebook:

Tomorrow is 31st December 2019 and the last day of this decade. While some are in celebration mood, a man has decided to humiliate a whole family by pulling out of his church and traditional wedding scheduled for tomorrow somewhere in Anambra because his bride to be cheated on him 2 months back.

In as much as I am not in support of what the bride did, I equally condemned the groom’s last-minute decision. He knew that his bride cheated on his since October and didn’t confront her. He went along with the marriage preparation putting the lady through so many stress while he remained in England hatching his evil plan.

He came back to Abuja on the 28th and told his mother this morning that he’s not going ahead with the wedding.
The painful part of this whole thing is that he’s acting as if he’s doing the right thing. Spoke with him, he was laughing and the next thing he said was that I can provide my brother to take his place since everything is in place. He carefully planned to humiliate this girl and her family and to be honest, this is wrong.

Bride to be has been crying uncontrollably in the village. She admitted that she made a mistake and she regrets her action. She had more to drink during her friend’s birthday and ended up sleeping with one of their mutual friends (action she greatly regrets) without knowing that it was a setup. The next day pictures were sent to her fiance and he held on to it and acted normal until today.

I asked him why he kept quiet and continued with the preparation, he said that he wants the girl to feel the kind of pain he felt when he saw the pictures.

I honestly think that what he’s doing is wrong and insulting to both his family and the bride’s family because both families have been preparing for this wedding and are ready until he called this morning to cancel.

Every other person is against his decision except his older brother but he’s not ready to change his stance.

This is not the kind of news one should be hearing at the end of the year. It’s painful and annoying.

Meanwhile, the girl said that he had cheated on her before and she forgave him.

My question is, why can’t he forgive her too and call it even? Why grandstand?

Follow us on Facebook – @Lailasnews; Twitter – @LailaIjeoma for updates

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Mother beats one-year-old baby to death for pulling TV off the table – Davina Diaries

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A one-year-old boy was allegedly beaten to death by his mother last week after pulling a TV off a table.

Rhianna Nichols, 20, claimed to have shaken one-year-old Viston and hit him with a slipper when medics rushed to her Detroit home last Thursday.

But the child is understood to have been taken into intensive care with a fractured skull, collarbone, ribs and pelvis.

Police have not confirmed details after Viston died on Saturday but his family have revealed that Nichols allegedly flew into a rage over a fallen flat-screen TV and attacked the boy.

Nichols was charged with felony murder and first-degree child abuse and torture on Monday in Wayne County.

‘It’s difficult to really know what to do right now just to think of the fact that I’ll never be able to hold my nephew again the same way,’ Viston’s paternal aunt Kenya Stevenson told Fox

‘I can’t imagine what my nephew had to go through.’

Pictures on social media showed the lifeless boy with tubes coming out of his body being held by a family member.

One donor, Patrick Debolt who gave $100, wrote: ‘I fostered rianna (sic) for 3 years. She returned to her mother and was abused. Later we found her and viston and would watch him on the weekends.

‘Rianna started back with the drug use and would text us she needed money all the time. She wouldn’t ask for us to watch him. She just wanted money.

‘We would pray for them. But we are so saddened over this. So very sad. Viston was such a happy baby. We have been crying all day most people will look at rianna as a monster but I remember a sweet little girl that cried and screamed when they gave her back to her mother.

‘She said daddy pat I love you, please. Please, I want to live with you and momma dawn….. I love viston and rianna so very much. God have mercy on your soul rianna. My sadness is so heavy. That poor sweet boy. Lord God why.’

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WHY I WON’T GET MARRIED OR HAVE CHILDREN – NOLLYWOOD ACTOR-CUM-PRODUCER OLU MICHAELS

Nollywood actor and film maker, Olu Michaels, 48, is one of the movie entrepreneurs who invested so much without getting the desired reward. He has worked with many  big names in the Nigerian movie industry, including Funke Akindele on Jenifa’s Diary for two years. The travel agent-cum-producer, in this no-hold-barred interview with OLAITAN GANIU revealed why he wants to remain single, and even childless, how his multi-million naira investment on movie project went down the drain, among others. Excerpts:

IT seems you’re a jack of all trade. What aspect of entertainment are you venturing into now?

I’m focusing on movie production because I’m looking into changing the narrative where this cartel has been in the industry for a while. I don’t like the idea where each time I switch on my television, there are certain people who do a so-called English movie. Also, as a producer, each time I said I want to produce a movie, I was told: ‘If this or that person are not going to be in the movie, we won’t buy it.’

I have actually produced a movie, gave it to a marketer and they refused it simply because the director is a Yoruba man or he is not part of their caucus. So, why is that? As long as the storyline is good, why do I have to bring your clique into my production? In the next two years, I’m looking into changing the narrative.

What approach are you using in changing this narrative?

Of course, I will keep doing what I know how to do best. Over the years, I’ve worked for many people and my observation is that once you are creative and unique, if you’re in a hole, clients will look for you. So, my approach is, continue producing good movies. If the content is good, the storyline is fantastic and picture quality is perfect, fans will look for you.

Do you partner with digital platforms?

No, this is another problem – getting a link with Netflix, Showmax, iRoko and likes. Hopefully, we would get a link someday because I am so passionate about dominating the Nigerian movie industry. Over six years, with the little money I saved, added with loan – my plan was actor to buy a house with money in Ajah, but the plan changed when I was coming back from France and I met an actress at the airport. I told her my desire to become a popular actor and she was like: ‘I could help you if you really want.’ As we speak, I have invested almost N100million and I’ve not got a penny back, not even a thousand naira.

Why?

It is annoying if I want to go in detail. The first movie I ever made titled, Igbekele, was shot for N2.1million and before I got a marketer to buy it for N600,000. In fact, the marketer was telling me, ‘I am just doing you a favour and to encourage you.’

Since then, about 13 movies I have produced so far are here on my table and the cheapest of them is N2.1 million. Last week I just finished one for N4.7million.

Do you think that is what’s robbing off movie entrepreneurs?

There are so many producers who have been here before me and some of them told me: ‘I give you just one year. You might not have money to feed.’ And, honestly, they are not lying because in less than six months, I have spent N47million and have not got a penny.

Even the N600,000 I said earlier the market bought my movie, he promised to pay in 4-5 months’ time and that will by February 2020. And people buy from us and sell it to online platforms for millions.

Read Also: Nollywood Actress Eniola Ajao opens up: my relationship with movie star Odunlade Adekola

So, what do you think is the way forward?

Well, what I think will help is when a company such as DSTV, Rock (Remi Njoku) open their doors; they only appoint a few people who can go to them. I think marketers might have edge over us as producers.

At a point, I was willing to give my movies to DSTV for free. All they need to do is to make the movie known to people and after a while, people will pay for it. Again, I’m not asking these people to give me money to produce movies. I have all the necessary resources and equipment to perfect movie but at least they should see the content but they will rather take their own people.

And for your movie to be in cinemas in Nigeria is not easy except you are a popular actor or actress.

Despite these challenges, you keep producing, why?

I will keep producing movies, except there is no money. But as long as there is funds, I don’t think I will stop. Honesty, I should get tired because of the house I’m hoping to buy. I don’t have it. Since I don’t have a house to stay, I will keep shooting. I just keep hoping that I won’t get tired one day.

Which project are you currently working on?

We just rounded off a movie last week and we are shooting another three before the year runs out. We are just waiting for the two titans, Omotola and Genevieve – in the Nigerian movie industry. I am currently working on featuring the two together on one of our projects.

For two years, I was part of a crew that worked on the popular comedy series, actress Jenifa’s Diary, created by Funke Akindele. I have produced several movies through my production outfit by the name ‘ibelieve’. The outfit has  produced  movies such as Irin Ajo, Like mother Like son, Crack, The Messenger and Tafa Onimoto among others.

 How are you charging the government to intervene?

The federal government has been doing the little they could but unfortunately, there are some people that are supposed to speak too, especially the veterans, to encourage the younger ones.

 As an actor, what do you look forward to in the script?

Deep storyline. In Nigeria, most scriptwriters narrow a storyline, they write based on one family. One of the best movies I saw recently is a movie titled, ‘King of Boys’. In the movie, there are lots of stories. You might just be seeing only Shola Shobowale but there over seven stories in the movie.

As a professional filmmaker, do you think it’s ideal to produce a movie in two to three days?

Well, it depends on the story. I won’t say it is wrong or right. When I came into the industry that was what was being done. I’ve been in a movie set in Asaba to produce an English movie and at a point, I wanted to run away because that is what I was used to in Yoruba setting, which could take about two to three days. If you go more than three days, they will tell you, it’s a project.

Today, a project is one week and what the English movie refers to as project is years but Yoruba sector, three days, we are through with a movie because of the cost and that is why there is no substance. I’m challenging all that with my movie project.

What would you describe as your best achievement?

So far, each time I get on set, I have been able to touch different lives. I am passionate about empowering and doing charity work. I believe if you are from nowhere, you will understand what it takes when someone begs you for food. Sometimes, I don’t like giving cash but prefer to donate the machine or equipment needed. While I was growing, I had nobody to help me. The worst that can happen to people is being poor without having someone to help.

 Any plans to venture into politics?

Yes, eventually I am hoping to become a governor or senator.

 Are you married?

I’m not married, and I don’t intend to. Truth be told, I’m scared of marriage and I don’t think I will ever get married. Though, I wanted to have kids when I was younger but not now, it is too late. Why I said it’s too late for having children is that I am a workaholic and I don’t  like a situation where I would want to sleep and then a baby starts crying. My parents have been begging me to get married but no.

 What do you look out for in a woman?

I am a jealous man. For example, if I marry an actress and I see her kissing another actor on set, I will never tolerate such. Also, if I marry a beautiful woman, I might never concentrate on my work because I will be on the look to protect her.

 How do you feel being lonely at night?

What I do every time I feel lonely is that I have a car that I bought with all my money. It is a Mercedes-Benz and the interior is wow. I love it. I just drive round town and get home and sleep off.

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15 Nollywood Actors Who Have Faded Out | P.M. News

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By Funmilola Olukomaiya

Nigeria’s Nollywood industry has evolved over the years while progressively producing beautiful actors we cannot forget in a hurry.

The industry has enjoyed unprecedented growth over the years and has witnessed a lot of resharpening from what it used to be.

Nollywood had in years back been graced with multitalented actors who once starred on our screens, week-in-week-out; it has also experienced the sudden fading out of some of its best acts, more to the shock of their fans.

Below are 15 Nollywood actors who have faded out of our screens.

1. Susan Patrick

Susan Patrick

Beautiful gap-toothed Susan was born in Akwa Ibom state, she came into the limelight after she acted in the movie ‘Sakobi: The Snake Girl’. This made her one of the most sought after Nollywood actresses in the early ’90s. She was alleged to have snatched another woman’s hubby while a student at Lagos State University (LASU). She eventually faded away as a result of competition for most of the roles she acted.

2. Lilian Bach

Lilian Bach

Famous Nollywood actress and former model Lilian Bach who turned 49 recently was shot to the limelight for her prominent roles in blockbuster movies like ‘Ogidan’ and ‘Married to a Witch’. Lilian was born in Lagos Island to a Yoruba mother and a Polish father.
Lilian came into the limelight as a model in the 1990s when she competed in the Most Beautiful Girl in Nigeria (MBGN) pageant. She also featured in several television commercials and she was at some point the Face of Delta Soap. She took a break from doing movies to pursue a career in production and has faded out since then.

3. Hanks Anuku

Hanks Anuku

Hanks Anuku was a Nigerian actor known for his numerous roles as a villain in many Nollywood films. He used to be the go-to guy when producers needed a perfect movie ‘bad boy.’ Trailed by personal controversies and alleged nonchalant attitude while on location, Hanks has gradually faded out of the movie scene. As of 2017, Anuku was said to have naturalized and become a Ghanaian.

4. Shan George

Shan George

Nollywood diva and movie producer Shan George was well-known the ’90s. The beautiful singer, prior to debuting in the movie ‘Thorns of Rose’, had previously featured in a 1997 soap opera titled ‘Winds of Destiny’. She is best known for her role in the movies ‘Outkast’ and ‘Welcome to Nollywood’.

5. Saint Obi

Saint Obi

Obinna Nwafor popularly known as Saint Obi, is a Nigerian actor, producer and director. As a great actor and Nollywood’s ‘bad’ boy, in the 1990s, hje was often called Nollywood’s Mr Quality because of his attention to details when producing or directing movies. He joined Nollywood in 1995 when he started attending movie auditions and featured in a number of soap operas which aired on NTA after which he was called by Opa Williams to star in a movie. Saint Obi is best known for his roles in Candle Light, Sakobi, Goodbye Tomorrow, Heart of Gold, Festival of Fire, Executive Crime and Last Party.

6. Pat Attah

Pat Attah

Patrick Uchenna Attah popularly known as Pat Attah is a famous Nollywood actor, director, television personality, model and musician. He the Nigerian Movie Industry in 1993 upon graduation and rose to popularity in 1994 after a brilliant performance in the movie “Glamour Girls”. In 2015, Pat became a born-again Christian and relocated with his family to Germany where he is a minister of the Gospel.

7. Sandra Achums

Sandra Achums

Popular Nollywood actress, Sandra Achums in the ’90s was probably one of the most popular actresses in the Nollywood industry. She joined the Nigerian movie industry in 1995 and acted in her first movie Deadly Affair. Her acting skills were excellent as she could interpret any role she was given hence, she was known as the bad girl of the Nollywood industry because she majorly acted as a bad girl, one role she always interpreted well. In the early 2000s, Sandra Achums took a break from acting and decided to face her family as she got married and started having children. She has since relocated to Germany with her family.

8. Charles Okafor

Charles Okafor

Popular Nollywood actor, Charles Okafor is recognized as one of the veteran actors in the Nollywood film industry. He was known in 1996 when he appeared in his first movie ‘Domitilla’ and in 1999, he rose to fame after starring in the blockbuster movie ‘End of the Wicked’. He is currently an ordained pastor.

9. Ejike Asiegbu

Ejike Asiegbu

Ejike Asiegbu is a Nigerian film actor and film director who once served as President of the Actors Guild of Nigeria. He was also previously appointed as personal assistant to former Biafran leader Odumegwu Ojukwu during the 1994 National Constitutional Conference in Abuja. He joined the Nigerian movie industry in 1996 and was shot into the limelight when he acted in his first movie, ‘Silent Night’.

10.

Rita Nzelu

Rita Nzelu is a renowned Nigerian actress, model, television personality who joined Nollywood in 1990. She made her debut in the movie “Living in Bondage”, a movie that brought her to fame and recognition in Nollywood. She is also known for Ortega and His Enemies (2014), Stigma of Womanhood (2016) and Terrible Sin (2001).

11. Ernest Asuzu

Ernest Asuzu

Ernest Asuzu is an actor, known for Last Wedding (2004), Ògìdán (2004) and Broad Day Light (2001). He was known for being dynamic in with his movie characters. Ernest also helped in contributing to the movie industry during his active years. He suffered a stroke in 2015.

12. Victoria Inyama

Victoria Inyama

Nollywood sweetheart, Victoria Inyama, began her acting career with a soap opera titled ‘Ripples’ between 1998/1999. She was featured after she was discovered by Alex Usifo who saw, the talent in her and invited her over for an audition. Victoria is married to the legendary author, Ben Okri. She relocated to the United Kingdom after she got married and this was responsible for her acting hiatus. She recently returned from her acting hiatus to feature in ‘Talking dolls,’ a 2017 movie which was rated as one of the best dramas of contemporary Africa.

13. Ndidi Obi

Nollywood actress, Ndidi Obi became popular when she took the lead role in the movie, ‘Nneka The Pretty Serpent’, she has since then been referred to as ‘Nneka The Pretty Serpent’ because of her epic role in the movie. She was recently featured in Ramsey Noah’s ‘Living In Bondage: Breaking Free’.

14. Nkiru Sylvanus

Nkiru Sylvanus

Nkiru Sylvanus is a famous Nigerian Nollywood actress who was known for her teary eyes and crying roles. Nkiru is one of the Nollywood actresses who created a niche for others to follow and one of the pillars that hold Nollywood firmly. She has acted in more than 150 movies playing minor and leads roles before delving into politics as the Special Assistant on Public Affairs to Rochas Okorocha, former Governor of Imo State.

15. Grace Amah

Grace Amah

Nollywood actress and mother of one, Grace Amah joined the Nigerian movie industry in 1999 when she started her acting career at the age of 13. She made her first debut as a 13-year-old character in the movie ‘Chains’. She became a public figure when she was featured in Teco Benson’s Nollywood blockbuster movie, ‘Elastic Limit’.

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Abuja man in trouble as lady he met on Twitter and invited refused to leave his house after one week (Read Story) | Theinfong

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“So I and one twitter sweetheart have been talking to each other for a while. It really did go down in the DMs. She stays in Abuja and I jokingly teased one Friday morning that my weekend would be interesting if she spent it with me at home. She laughed about it and agreed.

I didn’t really expect her to agree so it was a pleasant surprise. I finished work early that day and went home to cook, clean and prepare for my August visitor. She said she would be coming in the evening. I was prepared by 3pm sef. Early bird. Early worm. Early knacks.

She came as she promised and to cut the long story short, by Saturday morning, I was already tired of her. But the weekend wasn’t nearly over so I had to enjoy the boredom of her company one more night. She wasn’t really boring, I just think that we had different interests.

By Sunday evening, I thought she would be preparing to leave but babe was not bothered. She was seeing a Netflix series.

I didn’t want to ask her when she was leaving. Didn’t want to give her the impression that I wanted her to leave. Maybe she would leave in the morning.

Monday morning, as I prepared to go to work, she was still sleeping, I tapped her nicely and told her where to drop the keys for me WHEN she was leaving. Fam, I came back home and met her at home, she had even cooked dinner. Hot tears.

Ahh. Baby, you’re still here?? Of course she was and she didn’t reply. I ate the dinner like a married man and went outside to see that she had washed her clothes and they were hanging outside in the line. Her underwear was proudly renting space in my toilet. I don enter.

Ok. Maybe the clothes would be dry by tomorrow morning and she would be gone before I came back from work on Tuesday evening. I came back and the babe had even washed my own clothes. I couldn’t even express my tiredness of her, she was a nice person.

By Thursday morning, she was now telling me things to buy for her when I was coming back from work. As I drove to work, I parked by the road and began to ask myself “Am I dreaming? Did I marry and forget? Am I in love?” I still bought what she asked me to buy because idiot.

So I called my man @mr_ochonogor and told him what I was going through and in his infinite wisdom as a retired Lagos boy, he told me what to do. When I got home that Thursday evening I told her that my company was sending me to Benin for a week to inspect our assets.

So that night, a miracle happened, she packed her stuff because I told her I was leaving via road early in the morning. By 6AM, we were up and I had packed a bag.

I was hoping that she would enter a different vehicle and go her way but she insisted to follow me to the bus park.

Ahan babe, that’s unnecessary but she insisted and I had to keep up the lie. So we took Uber to God is good park in Utako. I was hoping she would go her way with the Uber but she wanted to wait until the bus I would enter had left. Was it love or she dey suspect me?

Fam, I paid N6,500 for the fare and sat down. She came to the window and we were professing how much we would miss each other, she even started crying and I felt something, but fam, my head cleared immediately and I maintained my lie. I promised to call her when I returned.

When the bus got to Giri junction, I told the driver to stop that I was not going again. “I no go refund you oh” the driver said. See you, did I tell you I want refund?? Abeg I Dey go office, I don dey late.

Fam, this happened early this year but I am still in Benin as far as both of us are concerned. My company decided to make me a permanent staff in Benin. “Can I come see you in Benin?” She asked. “I’m staying with my aunty here, dear”

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Woman gives birth to quintuplets after 16 years of childlessness

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It is the joy of every woman to be called a mother after marriage. for many that expectant joy could become instantly traumatic when the fruit of the womb isn’t forthcoming after years of marriage.

For 44-year-old Mrs Susan Egenti, her joy knew no bounds when she delivered quintuplets after 16 years of marriage. She was delivered of the babies at the Federal Medical Centre, Jabi, Abuja.

Mrs Susan Egenti an indigene of Nando, in Anambra East Local Government Area of Anambra State was delivered through a caesarean section on November 6, 2019. The quintuplets three boys and two girls were still in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the hospital when our reporters visited on Thursday afternoon, though the nurses looking after them said they were hale and hearty.

They stated that four of the babies were born healthy, measuring the average weight of a newborn, except one who was underweight and was weighed 1.9 Kg. Speaking to Daily Trust on Saturday on her hospital bed, Mrs Egenti said within her 16 years of marriage, she had taken all medical options (except IVF) to get a baby but to no avail until she had the quintuplets.

She said she resorted to traditional/herbal remedies to conceive a child but that was also futile, leaving her in perpetual despair. She described the birth of her babies as an enormous blessing from God as it was her first and only pregnancy since she got married in 2003. “I have been married since 2003 with no children, not even to get pregnant and have a miscarriage. Every time we attend a child dedication either in our church or elsewhere, I always come home crying, praying for the day God will have mercy on me and grant me the fruit of the womb.” She narrated that the birth of the babies almost took her life as she underwent two different operations, after the delivery, to stop the internal bleeding she suffered.

She stressed that the last operation one left her in a coma for about five days. Mrs Susan who lives with her husband in a room self-contained apartment in Utako village says she sells plastic containers while her husband manages a small chemist at Jabi park.

According to her, she has spent all her meagre resources on medical expenses and as such, they are left with nothing to cater for the five children, calling on Government and philanthropic Nigerians to assist them.

Her husband, Mr Emmanuel Nnamdi Egenti, who also spoke to our reporters at his one-bedroom accommodation in Utako village, an urban slum in the heart of Utako District, expressed joy over the birth of his quintuplets, saying even during their years of childlessness, they had never given up, but rather, put their hope in God, as there was nothing he could do.

However, he said they were yet to pay for the hospital bills even though the babies have been discharged but their mother is very ill and can’t even stand on her feet. He prays for the government’s intervention to enable then take care of the babies, adding that they would not be having any more babies in the future.

“We are grateful to God for what he has done for us. He has proven that He is the one and only true God, who answers prayers of those who call on Him,” he said, stressing that the because they were poor, the prospect of looking after the children in terms of feeding, clothing, education and healthcare was so bleak that their joy at having the babies was almost, immediately, turning into despair and despondency.

Dr. Tochukwu Nwoye, the medical doctor who led a team of doctors that carried out the operation, was not on seat when our reporters visited the hospital. The new mother of five who couldn’t hide her despair on how to foot the bills and subsequently take care of her new bundle of joy was kept in a semi-private ward away from her babies as she was still recuperating from the operations.

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Woman Gives Birth To Quintuplets After 16 Years Of Childlessness – YabaLeftOnline

person

It is the joy of every woman to be called a mother after marriage. for many that expectant joy could become instantly traumatic when the fruit of the womb isn’t forthcoming after years of marriage.

For 44-year-old Mrs Susan Egenti, her joy knew no bounds when she delivered quintuplets after 16 years of marriage. She was delivered of the babies at the Federal Medical Centre, Jabi, Abuja.

Mrs Susan Egenti an indigene of Nando, in Anambra East Local Government Area of Anambra State was delivered through a caesarean section on November 6, 2019. The quintuplets three boys and two girls were still in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the hospital when our reporters visited on Thursday afternoon, though the nurses looking after them said they were hale and hearty.

They stated that four of the babies were born healthy, measuring the average weight of a newborn, except one who was underweight and was weighed 1.9 Kg. Speaking to Daily Trust on Saturday on her hospital bed, Mrs Egenti said within her 16 years of marriage, she had taken all medical options (except IVF) to get a baby but to no avail until she had the quintuplets.

She said she resorted to traditional/herbal remedies to conceive a child but that was also futile, leaving her in perpetual despair. She described the birth of her babies as an enormous blessing from God as it was her first and only pregnancy since she got married in 2003. “I have been married since 2003 with no children, not even to get pregnant and have a miscarriage. Every time we attend a child dedication either in our church or elsewhere, I always come home crying, praying for the day God will have mercy on me and grant me the fruit of the womb.” She narrated that the birth of the babies almost took her life as she underwent two different operations, after the delivery, to stop the internal bleeding she suffered.

She stressed that the last operation one left her in a coma for about five days. Mrs Susan who lives with her husband in a room self-contained apartment in Utako village says she sells plastic containers while her husband manages a small chemist at Jabi park.

According to her, she has spent all her meagre resources on medical expenses and as such, they are left with nothing to cater for the five children, calling on Government and philanthropic Nigerians to assist them.

Her husband, Mr Emmanuel Nnamdi Egenti, who also spoke to our reporters at his one-bedroom accommodation in Utako village, an urban slum in the heart of Utako District, expressed joy over the birth of his quintuplets, saying even during their years of childlessness, they had never given up, but rather, put their hope in God, as there was nothing he could do.

However, he said they were yet to pay for the hospital bills even though the babies have been discharged but their mother is very ill and can’t even stand on her feet. He prays for the government’s intervention to enable then take care of the babies, adding that they would not be having any more babies in the future.

“We are grateful to God for what he has done for us. He has proven that He is the one and only true God, who answers prayers of those who call on Him,” he said, stressing that the because they were poor, the prospect of looking after the children in terms of feeding, clothing, education and healthcare was so bleak that their joy at having the babies was almost, immediately, turning into despair and despondency.

Dr. Tochukwu Nwoye, the medical doctor who led a team of doctors that carried out the operation, was not on seat when our reporters visited the hospital. The new mother of five who couldn’t hide her despair on how to foot the bills and subsequently take care of her new bundle of joy was kept in a semi-private ward away from her babies as she was still recuperating from the operations.

Source: Daily Trust

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The Emperor’s new clothes: the politics of birth research — Sheena Byrom

In Hans Christian Andersen’s tale of the Emperor’s new clothes no one dares to say they don’t see a suit of clothes on him for fear they will be seen as stupid and incompetent. It takes the cry from a small child, “but he isn’t wearing anything at all”, to identifying the farce being carried out.

Sometimes research papers are put out with misleading media releases and political agendas that go unquestioned by a media hungry for controversy and the next sensational headline. In this blog we will identify the naked Emperor in the form of the recent New Zealand paper (NZ) published by (2016), titled A Comparison of Midwife-Led and Medical-Led Models of Care and Their Relationship to Adverse Fetal and Neonatal Outcomes: A Retrospective Cohort Study in New Zealand.  The Wernham paper caused consternation around the globe with doctors waving it in triumph pretending the Emperor had a magnificent outfit on while midwives scrambled to understand what was happening, crying amidst the crowd, “but he isn’t wearing anything at all.”  

How did something that was fairly low level scientific evidence get more attention, and lead to such public questioning of the safety of midwifery care, than 15 randomised controlled trials and a (CSR) on this issue?

Just a reminder about the Level 1 evidence of continuity of midwifery from over 17,000 women randomised in 15 separate RCTs:

“This review suggests that women who received midwife-led continuity models of care were less likely to experience intervention and more likely to be satisfied with their care with at least comparable adverse outcomes for women or their infants than women who received other models of care. Further research is needed to explore findings of fewer preterm births and fewer fetal deaths less than 24 weeks, and all fetal loss/neonatal death associated with midwife-led continuity models of care.”

 How did we ever think the Emperor had new clothes?

The first alert in this recent saga is the media release that came out from the first author’s university, strictly embargoed beforehand to excite the ‘crowd’ awaiting the emperors arrival. The media release revealed the first bias in the authors’ agenda and was the ultimate hook for the media:

“Mothers using autonomously practising midwives throughout their pregnancy and childbirth are more likely to have adverse outcomes for their newborns than those who use obstetricians, according to a retrospective study of nearly a quarter million babies born in New Zealand published in PLOS Medicine by Ellie Wernham of University of Otago, New Zealand, and colleagues.”

Firstly, this study was never about midwifery care during childbirth, or pregnancy for that matter. Midwives also look after women cared for by private obstetricians so this care is never just about medical care just as it is never just about midwifery care. Secondly, there was no statistical difference in perinatal mortality. You would have hardly known this from the media reports. Thirdly, the authors were clearly data dredging when they combined Intrauterine hypoxia, birth related asphyxia and neonatal encephalopathy in order to get a highly significant outcome. Rare adverse events and small numbers were sensationalised in the media release (“55 percent lower odds of birth related asphyxia, 39 percent lower odds of neonatal encephalopathy, and 48 percent lower odds of a low Apgar score at five minute after delivery”). Neonatal encephalopathy occurs 1-2 in 1000 births and is a rare event. Presented this way makes it sound so dramatic and it takes only one or two cases to change the outcome.

Why the Emperor is actually naked

The authors were unable to look at actual care during childbirth because they don’t appear to have this data, so they took model of care at booking and then misled the media and public that this was an indication of care at birth, when it was not. The problem with this is while all women who book with private obstetricians will remain under the care of private obstetricians from booking to birth, between 30-35% of women under midwifery care will be referred during pregnancy to a doctor. Despite this fact all outcomes (only adverse perinatal ones) in the paper are reported as due to midwifery care, when they are clearly not.

One could argue that the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of continuity of midwifery care reported in the use a similar method – that is model of care on booking and intention to treat analysis. However, the difference is randomisation reduces selection bias and the study groups should be as similar as possible at the outset so the researchers can isolate and quantify the effect of the intervention they are studying (in this case midwife or medical care). In a RCT you can see what care women got and you would also know the mode of birth and maternal outcomes, which are not reported in this study. RCT’s can be used to change practice but lower level evidence should not; yet that has not stopped groups such as the calling for this in Australia.

The NZ study had several concerning limitations that were not adequately considered in the unfolding debate:

1.     One of the most significant findings of the CSR of continuity of midwifery care was the 24% reduction in preterm birth under midwifery care. There was also a significant reduction in perinatal mortality. Only women over 37 weeks were included in the recent NZ study, so there was no chance to see whether this important effect was seen in this study.

2.     Not only are of long term outcomes but there were a large number of missing Apgar scores and this was greater for women who booked with obstetricians.

3.     The inclusion of women more than 42 weeks, which were seen in larger numbers in the midwife booked group and are more likely to have stillbirths associated with prolonged pregnancies, is concerning. If the authors took 37 weeks gestation as a cut-off to exclude preterm birth (higher risk), why not take 41+6 to exclude the higher risk post-term pregnancies. It would have been very interesting to know how many adverse events were seen in the post-term group. Women choosing midwifery care are more likely to not want to be induced and to go over 42 weeks, as is seen in this study.

4.     The inability to separate antepartum stillbirth from intrapartum stillbirth is critical in trying to assess the impact of birth provider on outcomes and this could not be done, despite the study protocol suggesting it would be.

5.     In the study protocol published with the paper neonatal nursery admissions were examined but not reported. When we look at the author’s Master’s thesis where this information is available, more neonatal admissions are reported for babies born to women who booked with private obstetricians. This was not reported in this paper. One has to ask, why?

6.     In the first author’s Master’s thesis (where this study originally came from), substantially lower rates of caesarean section (22% vs 32.9%) and instrumental birth rates (9% vs 12.3%) are reported for women who booked with midwives, leading to significantly less maternal morbidity. Again this was not reported, giving a very one-sided view considering the authors are virtually questioning the entire NZ maternity system.

7.     There appears to be quite a bit of missing data in this study and it is unclear how this was dealt with in the analysis.

8.     Many socio demographic variables are not accounted for (e.g. alcohol and drug use), and others such as smoking are notoriously underreported. Midwives tend to look after women with greater socio demographic disadvantage and mental health issues. None of this is adjusted for.

9.     Other medical complications that arise following booking, such as gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, etc are not accounted for and may be increased in women who book with midwives due to ethnicity factors, life style etc.

10.  Rurality and birth place were not taken into consideration, limiting the usefulness of this study to help make targeted changes rather than slamming the entire N Z maternity system.

11.  There is no difference in PMR between Australia and NZ despite the fact that 30% of care in Australia is by private obstetricians whilst in NZ around 90% of women have a midwife as a lead care provider.

12.  A previous NZ paper that also hit the media headlines in recent times, purporting to show the risk of perinatal death was higher when midwives were in their first year following graduation, has recently been questioned by the who have been unable to replicate the study. This is worrying.

13.  of low risk women in NSW who had a birth in a private hospital under private obstetric care with low risk women who had a birth in a public hospital with midwife/medical care we found greater morbidity for women giving birth in a private obstetric model of care.

The one highlight in this whole saga has been the united support of the midwives in NZ by the , The , , and bodies around the world.

The political fallout from this paper has been extraordinary, for it actually tells us very little. No practice changes could ever be made based on this study. The Emperor may have no clothes, but the delusion has been maintained by a misleading media release, politically motivated reporting of findings by the authors, a hungry unquestioning media sensing blood in the water and wanting sensational headlines, and obstetricians determined to drag the advances made by the profession of midwifery back to the ‘good old days’ when they were compliant handmaidens. 

#ENOUGH

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Female Victims Of Sex Trafficking Relieve Heart-rending Experiences Of Their Near-death Journey To Get Greener Pastures Overseas – Motherhood In-Style Magazine

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Every year, thousands of women and children become victims of sex trafficking in their own countries and abroad.

Nigeria is a source, transit, and destination country for women and children subjected to trafficking in persons including forced labor and forced prostitution.

Trafficked Nigerian women and children are recruited from rural areas within the country’s borders – women and girls for involuntary domestic servitude and sexual exploitation.

The quest to make it big in life coupled with the harsh living condition in the country forced these women to jump into the prospects of travelling abroad at any single opportunity not minding the consequences.

Many of these distraught and sometimes desperate Nigerians believe that the streets overseas are paved with gold, pounds and dollars that once you step into those countries it will be bye-bye to poverty and hardship.

Unfortunately, as it is said, not all that glitters is gold. To escape the hardship at home, many take great risks to travel abroad only to enter into a more harrowing experience.

Some die in the process while others escape with scars that may haunt them for the rest of their lives. While some were victims of circumstances, having been tricked and deceived into such journey, others take the risk of opting to travel abroad by land and sea routes knowing that they cannot afford the normal process of getting visas and honouring several embassy appointments. Some of the girls deceived into this route end up as sex slaves with so much regret and consequences.

reporter encountered two young women in Anambra, Amarachi Ojene, 23, and Tobechukwu Igboeri, who shared the chilling experiences of their near-death journey to get greener pastures overseas. Years after such ‘journey to hell’, their lives have never been the same again.

Amarachi, from Nibo, Awka South Local Government Area of Anambra State was an SS2 student in 2012 when she encountered a devil in human skin who not only took advantage of her naivety and innocence, but also exploited her poor parental background to trick her into a sex slavery trip abroad.

Having lost her dad when she was seven years, Amarachi relied on her mother who eked out a living by hawking cooked Okpa (a local delicacy) around the Awka metropolis. They also augmented the proceeds by engaging in manual labour in local farms for people at a fee.

So, she was so excited when she met her friends who told her that their aunt was looking for a house help that would live with her overseas. She reasoned that going abroad with the woman would ease a lot of load for her suffering mother as she would be paid in dollars, which she would send home to alleviate the family sufferings.

Hear Amarachi’s gory story:

“I vividly remember the day that two girls in my town, Chioma and Miracle, met me at the Eke Awka market, where I had gone to buy palm fruits for my mum’s Okpa business. They asked if I would like to travel abroad; they said their relation living in a foreign land was looking for a house-help to take along.

I was excited as I thought that a bright prospect for higher education and escape from poverty had come not knowing that I was walking into a death trap. They told me that the same relation was also taking them with her, so that they could be fixed into money-yielding ventures over there.

When I went home, I didn’t tell my mum immediately because I was afraid of her reaction, but when I eventually told her, she was also excited more so when she heard that the woman taking me abroad is from Awka. One week later, they came back and told me that we would leave in a few days.

They never told me the main thing we were going to do there and it was later that I realized that those girls were her agents who recruit unsuspecting ladies for her in the organized sex pimp business she does.

They took me to the woman called Aunty Ebube and I was surprised when I got there and saw many young girls there too. She asked me probing questions, wanting to know if I was aware of the business I had come to do and said no. We slept that night and the next morning she took us to a shrine at Umubelu Awka to take oath of allegiance and commitment.

The native doctor welcomed us saying that the expected guests had arrived. We were 19 girls in all and I was the youngest and the most immature among them, barely 16 years old then. Everything started happening in a jiffy as the man gave us white cloth to tie on our body.

The native doctor warned Ebube when we got there that I was going to spoil things for her, but I didn’t understand what was going on. I fainted there and they sprinkled water on me, but that didn’t deter them from administering the oath of secrecy.

Ebube said that we were going to pay her N450,000 each when we get to our destination and the native doctor warned us of the dire consequences of reneging in the deal as he told us that the deity of the shrine would strike any defaulter dead.

With a shaking body yet lacking the requisite courage to extricate myself from their grip, we got initiated there. We drank and chewed some substances there and were given a small calabash each. We danced round the shrine to complete the ritual.

The next day, we moved to Onitsha and boarded a luxury bus travelling to the North. She told us to tell any policeman we see on the road that we were going on holidays in the North to see our parents based there.  She told us never to accept that we were together in the journey and that if we implicate ourselves, she would not hesitate to disown us.”

Hijab for all of us

“When we reached the northern part of the country, she told us to change into hijab and pretend that we are northern Muslim girls. A vehicle, which she had pre-arranged, was already waiting for us by the time we arrived. We were squeezed into the vehicle.

She kept picking more people on the road, which showed that a syndicate was involved. We slept in Zendel and by 3:00a.m we left for another route until we got to a place they called Agadez. She told us to stay there for the meantime and find our destiny pending when those who will take us overseas arrive.”

‘Business’ begins

“When she told us that we should stay and test our destiny briefly, I never knew that it was a kick off for the prostitution business until I was handed over to some clients in a hotel. She forced us to wear skimpy dresses and singled me out having seen my demeanour.

She told me that I’m now in a no-man’s land and I should cooperate if I still wanted to remain alive. I was crying knowing that I had walked into a trap that would take divine intervention for me to wriggle out of it. I was deep in thought when she landed me a deafening slap.  She told me to be ready to die if I won’t allow men to sleep with me.

My first time was a man old enough to be my father. The man was given option to make a choice among the bevy of girls quartered there and he picked me knowing that I was a fresh virgin. I told him that it was over my dead body that he would sleep with me. I stubbornly refused to succumb to their threats.

Short time sex there goes for 5,000 CFAs while full time is 10,000 CFA. We kept on arguing and she told me that I should not join issues with her. I was made to know that our batch of girls was the fourth trip for her while the final destination is Libya.  Usually she would just sell the girls at Agadez and return to the Southeast to recruit more for the same purpose.”

How my Igbo dialect saved me

“On that fateful night, two men came to look for female companions. She spoke with them in the local language, which I did not understand. As I was about to be handed over to them, I exclaimed in Igbo language, ‘Ewooh, o kam si jee (Is this how I have ended up)?’  When the supposed sex customers heard my exclamation, they became more interested in taking me to their home at all costs that night. They offered Madam Ebube 15,000CFA and took me.

On our way, they started asking me probing questions and I opened up and told them my predicament and identity. They were shocked and also told me they were from Enugu State. Instead of taking advantage of me that night, they treated me like a sister.

One of the boys, Anayo, told me that perhaps God made them come to the brothel that night for my sake because they had already retired after the day’s business, but on a second thought decided to stroll to a happening joint.

The two boys kept me safe, took pity on me, refused to sleep with me and offered me a mattress where I slept in the sitting room and they retired to the bedroom. They took me back to the hotel the next morning and Madam asked me whether I enjoyed my night with those boys and I said yes.

I told her that I want to go home and she started another round of threats. She told me that I could go if I repay her N450, 000. She sold one girl there and told me that I would be the next; she also reminded us that the oath we took spelt out death or madness on anyone who attempted to leave the place secretly.”

At the crossroads

“At this point, my heart was pounding and I excused her and ran back in the direction to Anayo’s house, but he was not in. I wrote a notice on their gate telling him that if he doesn’t come to rescue me immediately, I would be either dead or sold off into slavery the next day.

As God would have it, I was apprehensive that night knowing that time was ticking away for me when suddenly Anayo showed up and told our madam that he needs me for another night again. Madam thought I treated him well and handed me to him, but he took me to the house of one of the villagers and hid me there.

I was hidden for three days and madam had to suspend her trip and kept searching for me. Anayo gave me a phone and was relating all that was happening to me until the fourth day that he took me to the park. If not that he hid me, I would have died in the desert en route Libya.

Of all the 19 girls, I was the only one who returned home. I have not set eyes again on Ifunanya, who she sold first. (Begins to sob). I don’t know their fate till today. Whether they eventually reached Libya, died of hunger or were devoured by wild beasts.

“Anayo and his brother bought a ticket for me, took me by 3:00 a.m from Zendel and landed in Kano.  I boarded a vehicle to Abuja, but I didn’t know anybody there.”

Ran into kidnapper’s vehicle

“In Abuja, I entered a cab that promised to take me to Kuje where some of our brothers resided, but I never knew I had boarded the wrong vehicle. The man took me on a wrong route and headed towards a thick bush. I raised the alarm, but nobody could answer me.

The man showed me his undies and I saw all manner of weapons, guns, knife and other things he had on him. He told me to say my last prayer because he would kill me and take my body parts. He used the short knife to slash my clothes to pieces and I was stark naked.

He raped me and wanted to take my body parts fresh and I ran and he gave me a hot chase. I saw a vehicle laden with tomatoes and lay flat for the vehicle to crush me. The driver stopped abruptly, picked me naked like that and I passed out. When I regained consciousness, I saw myself in the military barracks, Abuja.”

She never knew I was still alive

Under the custody of the military, Amarachi was taken to the scene where she boarded the evil man’s cab, but the man could not be traced. The army later handed her to NAPTIP who documented her case and made efforts to rehabilitate her and also seek ways of punishing her trafficker.  She was later sent home in Anambra where she reunited with her family. She later saw her trafficker and got her arrested.

“The day I saw her at Eke Awka, she was shocked because she thought I was dead. Because we reported to DSS and NAPTIP when I came home, they gave me a number to call them any day I sight her and that was what I did. When I called the phone line, she was picked up. They raided her home, detained her and the native doctor (he is dead now) and were also charged to court.”

Picking up the pieces of her life

Settling down to a normal life after the harrowing experience for Amarachi has not been easy. Though she managed to go back to school and finally wrote her senior school certificate exams, Amarachi’s problems are far from being over. Her mother suddenly collapsed and died from high blood pressure leaving her and the siblings as orphans.

She also fell in love with a man who is not financially buoyant. The uncle who now acts as her father insisted that all the traditional rites of marriage would be completed before she is pronounced married. Along the line, she got pregnant for the fiancé and had to give birth in her home. Now nursing a 10-month-old baby boy, life has remained tough and harsh for her.

“My uncle refused to allow the man take me home because he couldn’t fulfill the long list of requirements presented to him. My mother died heartbroken for all these shocks and now without both parents, we find it even difficult to feed,” she lamented.

Appeal and words of advice

“I still thank God I’m alive today.  My advice is that people should not allow anybody deceiving them with fairy tale promises about travelling abroad.  I need urgent help presently. Helpless without mum or dad and also nursing a baby, I desire to go back to school and upgrade my life, but now even to feed is a serious problem. Government and public-spirited individuals should help me,” she pleaded.

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Boy, 3, plunges to death from London flat in second fatal tower block fall in 24 hours

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A THREE-year-old boy plunged to his death in the second fatal fall from a London tower block in 24 hours.

Little Edward Popadiuc died in hospital two hours after falling from a fourth-floor flat in Bridge Court, Harrow, on Friday.

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Little Edward Popadiuc died in hospital two hours after falling from a fourth-floor
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24 Hours
Dad Alexandru said: ‘I don’t want to cry any more, I do it all day and all night. He is our angel now’
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Little Edward Popadiuc died in hospital two hours after falling from a fourth-floor flat in Bridge Court, Harrow
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Dad Alexandru said today: “I don’t want to cry any more, I do it all day and all night. He is our angel now.”

The fall came just hours after a toddler died after falling through a ninth floor window with a faulty handle his mum had urged the council to fix for two months.

Witnesses told how the distraught mother was left in “stone cold shock” after her 18-month-old boy – named locally as Ali – plummeted from his family home onto a first floor canopy at 19-floor council block in Tottenham, north London, on Thursday.

The toddler is believed to have fallen from Stellar House after a window baby lock stopped working while his mum was in the kitchen.

The boy, whose parents are said to be Kurdish, was pronounced dead in hospital about 11.30am on Thursday morning.

Shocked neighbour Meral Dervish, 51, said the baby’s 27-year-old mum-of-two Duygu called her in tears after the fall.

She said last week: “He opened a window, he fell down. The window, it was faulty.

‘FAULTY WINDOW’

“For nearly two months she was calling the council just to come to fix it.

“The handle was not secure. They were coming to fix it, but then this happened. She was crying, she was shocked yesterday. She was complaining about this.”

Meral added: “He was a very nice boy. The mum was looking after the kids brilliantly, she was caring for her children.”

Ali lived with his five-year-old sister, his mother and father, Gukhan.

The family had been at the flat for around four years, it was said locally.

A man he believed to be Ali’s grandfather was seen crying at the scene, one person said.

Danny Hunt, 31, who also lives on the ninth floor, told The Sun Online: “I heard the shouting, the girl was screaming, I didn’t know what she was saying. She was panicking.

“I looked out of a neighbour’s window and saw the baby lying in the canopy, just lying there.

The window lock wasn’t working so the baby woke up, reached out for the window and just fell out from there.


Family friend

“He had blood on him. He wasn’t moving at all. He was lying on his side or on his back. He had blood from his neck, it was quite a lot.
“His mother was in shock. There were two other grown people there too, the girl’s family.
“She couldn’t say what she wanted to say. She was stone cold shocked. Someone did call the ambulance so I went back inside.”

A 25-year-old local shop assistant said had heard the tragic news through her sister, who was friends with the family.

“The mum was cooking in the kitchen before she went to pick up her other child,” she told The Sun Online.

“The window lock wasn’t working so the baby woke up, reached out for the window and just fell out from there.

“I was upset when I heard but we were thinking about the mum.”

Paramedics were scrambled to the scene and an air ambulance was dispatched to the scene.

No arrests have been made.

Zina Etheridge, Haringey Council’s chief executive, said: “We are aware of a tragic incident of a young child falling from height in Tottenham, and our deepest sympathies are with the family at this time.

“The police are currently investigating and it would be inappropriate for us to comment further until more is known.”

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A police spokesman said: “Officers, the London Ambulance Service, London’s Air Ambulance and the London Fire Brigade attended and found the baby boy in a critical condition.

“The child, believed to be aged 18 months, was taken to a north London hospital where he was pronounced dead at 11.39am.”

Formal identification and a post-mortem examination will take place in due course, he said.

Ambulance Service
The boy is understood to have died after falling onto the first floor ledge, pictured
SWNS:South West News Service

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