My favourite film aged 12: Gold | Film | The Guardian

The quick answer is: “No.” The longer answer is that it depends on your expectations. If you feel certain you are about to watch an execrable film, you will be pleasantly surprised: Gold is a perfectly serviceable thriller, with some tense moments and a genuinely exciting climax in the flooded mine at Pinewood.

One of the reasons the film isn’t as shit as it should be is that it was made, in no small part, by members of the James Bond team. Peter Hunt directs – he was editor of the early Bonds and directed On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. John Glen, later to direct five Bonds, edits and directs the second unit. The production designer is Syd Cain, who did From Russia With Love, OHMSS and Live and Let Die. Those guys are responsible for making two men and a dinghy floating around at Pinewood seem an exciting climax.

Then there’s Roger’s character, Rod Slater, a maverick, woman-chasing commitment-phobe ultimately prepared to die to save the mine (and its miners), which he almost does. There’s a suggestion a genuine relationship may be on the cards with Terry Steyner (York), whose evil husband has conveniently died a few minutes earlier and who is on hand to look after Rod in an ambulance.

It’s definitely one of Roger’s best non-007 performances. This was 1974, so he hadn’t established his Bond persona. Hunt pushes him to be as serious as possible. I certainly believe he’s a miner. And that he’s younger than his 46 years – he’s in good shape, the hair’s more tousled than usual and there’s a bit more sweat than Bond. And he gets quite badly injured at the end. Or at least his arms do.

My sense is that York fought hard to be more than just another Bond girl, making her character as strong as possible. There’s a great scene where she flies Moore back to the stricken mine in her plane (she’s rich) and he accuses her of being involved in the conspiracy. She’s outraged: she won’t take any shit from Roger. As it happens, she is involved in the conspiracy, but she doesn’t know that yet.

And the villain? We’re very much in the “speak quickly with a slight smile” stage of Sir John Gielgud’s film career but there’s a wonderful moment where one of the sub-villains tells him they’ve commissioned a survey that shows just how close the mine is to water but have cleverly replaced every mention of the word “water” with the word “gold”.

“Ingenious”, says Gielgud, without the smile.

There’s also the brilliantly intrusive score by Elmer Bernstein, a crucial reason the action sequences are so tense and exciting. The song Jimmy Helms belts at the start and the end is magnificently absurd too.

I truly think this is Roger’s best non-Bond. Others tout The Man Who Haunted Himself (1971), in which Roger does actually have to do a fair bit of acting, playing a good guy and his evil doppelganger. That probably is his best performance. At the end of his life, knighted, Sir Roger certainly thought so. But I think Gold is the better film. The bar isn’t high, but Gold is a perfectly enjoyable romp one could happily sit through, some warm self-isolated evening.

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Suicide remains leading cause of death for those aged 10 to 29 in S’pore

There were a total of 400 reported suicides in Singapore in 2019, up from 397 in 2018, Samaritans of Singapore (SOS) said in a release in Aug. 3, 2020.

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Suicides increased across most age groups

Most age groups registered a slight increase in the number of suicide deaths in 2019.

Deaths as a result of suicide dropped to 8.00 per 100,000 Singapore residents from 8.36 in 2018.

Suicide remains the leading cause of death for youths aged 10 to 29.

Notably, the number of suicide deaths amongst those aged 20 to 29 years remains highest compared to all other age groups.

20 to 29 years old group vulnerable

In 2019, 71 youths aged between 20 and 29 years took their own lives.

Suicide accounts for about one-third of all reported deaths in this age group.

Seeking help

Of those who revealed their age, youths between 20 to 29 years old accounted for approximately 17 per cent of total calls attended to on the 24-hour hotline, and making up for about 37 per cent of Email Befriending clients.

In particular, the number of calls from this age group rose to 4,124, up from 3,396 calls in the previous fiscal year ending March 2019.

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Problems encountered

Through interactions with clients, SOS observed that these individuals often cite issues with romantic relationships, difficulties coping with one’s mental health and struggles managing challenging situations as contributing factors that led to their acute distress.

In a survey recently conducted by SOS to understand the community’s perception towards suicide, one in three in the 20 to 29 age group, responded that they will not consider contacting others for help when they are emotionally overwhelmed.

Stigmatising beliefs around suicide emerged as a common barrier to seeking help for this group.

The fear of embarrassment, being judged, along with the sense of hopelessness that nothing will help, were prominent reasons that surfaced in the survey findings.

A total of 2,497 respondents participated in the survey, of which 580 were aged 20 to 29.

Gasper Tan, Chief Executive of SOS, said: “While the rise in calls is an encouraging sign that youths are recognising the importance of their mental health and need for early intervention, the high number of suicide deaths in this age group is concerning.”

“Much more remains to be done as a community to further understand and address the issues that may prevent our youths from seeking help”.

Highlighting the integral role of advocacy in recent years, he added: “As the lead agency in suicide prevention, SOS will continue to harness these efforts, drawing on the strength, support and network of the community in our programmes and outreach”.

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SOS text-based service introduced

The launch of SOS’ text-based service, SOS Care Text, has been brought forward in recognition of the hesitation of calling the hotline for some individuals in distress or contemplating suicide and their preference for another option through text messaging.

Referring to the increase in the number of calls into the 24-hour Hotline and emails during the Circuit Breaker period, Tan said: “During these trying times, it is crucial that SOS is able to readily provide an alternative form of emotional support while catering to the changing communication preferences of the community.”

Respondents to the SOS survey had also indicated text-based services as the most preferred platform to seek help, reflecting the timely introduction of this offering.

About SOS

Samaritans of Singapore (SOS) is a secular, non-profit suicide prevention centre.

Established 1969, SOS has developed into a professionally run and managed organisation that adopts a holistic approach to suicide-related topics, focusing on prevention, intervention and postvention, an intervention conducted after a suicide for loved ones and friends.

With the mission to be an available lifeline to anyone in crisis, SOS offers emotional support to people in crisis, thinking of suicide, or affected by suicide.

All information shared with SOS is treated as confidential and people can choose to remain anonymous.

Top photo via Unsplash

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Bernell Trammell death: Milwaukee shooting victim’s memory stays alive

He ‘gave freedom to everyone’s voice’: A week after shooting death of Bernell Trammell, friends keep his legacy alive

Sophie Carson
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Published 12:00 AM EDT Aug 1, 2020

Bernell Trammell spent his life starting conversations.

He loved hearing what passing strangers had to say. Trammell eagerly sought out discussion — on sidewalks, homemade signs in hand, and through submissions to his publication, eXpressions Journal.

“Everybody has a voice. Everybody’s voice has power,” longtime friend Pia Lombardi recalled Trammell saying.

When he was shot and killed last week outside his Riverwest office, Trammell’s own voice was silenced, Lombardi said.

But at a vigil for him Friday, his memory and message remained vibrant. Friends recalled his good nature and willingness to chat, and neighbors said the city lost an irreplaceable local character.

“Milwaukee, the east side, Riverwest — we’re going to miss him. Because he was very vocal,” said neighborhood resident Alicia Williams. 

Because Trammell was outspoken about religion and politics — and supported President Donald Trump — some suspect he was targeted for his beliefs. Prominent conservatives have called for a federal investigation into his death, and the suspicion of a political motivation made national news and gained traction on social media.

Lombardi said she even received an invitation to appear on commentator Laura Ingraham’s Fox News show.

Milwaukee police have not released any information about possible motives for the killing.

Trammell also carried signs supporting the Black Lives Matter Movement and state Sen. Lena Taylor, a Democrat.

Those who knew Trammell said they don’t know why he was killed and can’t understand why anyone would shoot him. More than a week after his death, they don’t have any answers. Police have asked the public’s help in looking for a suspect in the shooting and have offered a cash reward for tips. 

Malcolm Hunt, a chaplain for the Milwaukee Police Department, speaks and prays for his friend Bernell Trammell during a memorial vigil.
Rick Wood / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Nate Fox of Milwaukee called Trammell a “gentle beast” who was genuinely interested in hearing different perspectives.

About 15 years ago, Fox used to see Trammell around Riverwest, dressed in a leather jacket and leather chaps.

“He didn’t look like a very approachable guy,” Fox laughed. “But if you would actually have a conversation with him you would see that he’s genuine, that he would hear you out.”

Fox, an atheist at the time, started going to Trammell with questions about religion. He didn’t know many Christians, and Trammell never judged him, he said.

Eventually Fox converted to Christianity. He credits Trammell for those early eye-opening conversations that challenged his stereotypes on what people of faith looked and acted like.

Trammell “gave freedom to everyone’s voice,” said Clayton Hotelling, a Milwaukee pastor and social worker. “It didn’t matter where you were from.”

In the 1990s Hotelling used to read eXpressions Journal and even submitted his artwork to the publication a few times. He appreciated that Trammell gave a platform to opinions of all kinds without judgment — the willingness to hear someone out has been lost in today’s political discourse, he said.

Hotelling was driving with a friend on the east side two days before Trammell’s death and saw him on the sidewalk holding a Trump sign. Hotelling honked his horn, and Trammell gave them a thumbs-up.

“It touched our heart because that was the last time we saw him,” Hotelling said.

Bernell Trammell of Milwaukee takes a photo with his cellphone while with son, Bernell Trammell Jr., 7, at a control burn at Alice Bertschy Kadish Park in Milwaukee on May 7, 2013. Trammell was fatally shot outside his office in Riverwest on July 23, 2020.
Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Patricia Holland also saw Trammell shortly before his death — she estimates about 30 minutes prior.

Holland maintains church gardens in Riverwest and headed last Thursday to Trammell’s shop to plant some flowers in his new flower beds. She left him laughing, promising to water the plants that evening.

Then from her home Holland heard what she thought were firecrackers. She followed police cars to the scene and saw paramedics performing CPR. But she knew Trammell hadn’t made it.

“A whole chill came over me,” she said.

Trammell deserves for his killer to be found, Holland said. Somebody in the neighborhood knows something, she said, pointing to the surrounding apartments and homes.

And Trammell deserves for his legacy to live on. Lombardi, who lived with Trammell in the 1990s in the apartment above his office, plans to buy the building on East Wright Street. 

She wants to continue publishing eXpressions Journal. Trammell’s voice may have been silenced, but he’d want Milwaukee to keep talking.

Contact Sophie Carson at (414) 223-5512 or scarson@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter at @SCarson_News.

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Perspective | It’s time we stopped with the phrase “gifted and talented”

By Stephanie Sprenger
@mommyforreal

Last week, I saw two toddlers wearing “Genius” T-shirts. When I saw the first one, I smiled, as I undeniably have a soft spot for ironic baby clothing. But when just hours later the second “genius” came waddling along, it gave me pause. I know these clever shirts proclaiming that our children are “brave like Daddy” or “sassy like Mommy” are just supposed to be funny and cute. Yet I feel slightly troubled by what lies under the surface of our attempts to label our children with myriad superlatives.

The “Genius” one left a distinctly bad taste in my mouth, and after a few days of pondering, I realized why. It was a tiny incarnation of the “gifted and talented” program, which is a concept I’ve been struggling with as a parent.

When I was in 5th grade, I was selected to participate in TAG (yes, talented and gifted), a program that took place during two hours of every Friday afternoon. I recall playing challenging brain games that required teamwork and higher-level questioning, completing independent study projects, on one occasion making a collage about photography (hmmm), and then trotting merrily back to class with my other above-average classmates.

I moved the following year, and was placed in a similar program with a different name: Alpha. Was it, shudder, because we were “alpha students?” It was my first and last meeting. Although I carried straight A’s—aside from my B in P.E.—after a snide comment from one of my fellow Alpha students, I chose never again to participate in a gifted and talented program.

Over the years, I’ve heard it referred to as ULE—Unique Learning Experience—and Exceptional Learners, but where I live now it’s straight up “GT—gifted and talented.” My experience with GT as a parent of non-GT students has been eye-opening.

When my oldest daughter, now 13, was in Montessori preschool, the staff provided a parent meeting where we could ask questions about kindergarten and elementary school options. Hands shot up all around the room: “Tell us more about the GT programs in the district.” “When can we test for GT?” Aside from the occasional inquiry about bilingual education programs, it was pretty much the same: How do we get into the GT program?

My husband and I raised our eyebrows at each other. Who knew that all this time our precocious little darling had been surrounded by entirely gifted students? Over the next few years, acquaintances would ask me when I was getting my daughter tested for GT. “I’m not,” I usually replied simply. The high-pressure program was not something I wanted for my child, who now is a 4.0 honor roll student in middle school. To be honest, I wasn’t really sure she qualified for GT; her grades have much more to do with her personality and determination. But the entire operation left a bad taste in my mouth.

Semantics matter to me, perhaps more than most people. Don’t even get me started on my hang-ups about the word “blessed.” To me, being “gifted and talented” sounds a whole lot like being bestowed with a well, gift, that others were not granted. It’s pretentious, and slightly obnoxious.

However, the value of these programs is undeniable. There are students whose needs are not being met in a one-size-fits-all curriculum: a multitude, and not just the above average variety. It is difficult to comprehend the challenge of teachers who must constantly adapt their learning experience to the diverse group of students they teach. These programs are absolutely essential and provide a much-needed, enriching, stimulating education for the kids who are becoming bored in their classrooms, who are potentially even causing problems because they aren’t being challenged.

The future of New York City’s public gifted and talented programming is now in the spotlight, thanks to the mayor-appointed School Diversity Advisory Group’s recommendation that the existing GT programs be replaced by magnet schools. A group of gifted education teachers have instead called for an overhaul and reform of the system instead of elimination, which they hope may affect other GT programs around the country. But perhaps there is more fundamental reform required than altering the selection process and addressing the issues of economic privilege and racial segregation.

Perhaps what we really need to address is what we call these programs and the way parents conceive of them. The pressure behind TAG, including the language we use to describe it, needs to change. So too the frenetic rush to test our kids, not necessarily because we want to accommodate their learning style, but because of the proclamation that they are gifted and talented and therefore destined for a higher purpose, will lead to a breeding ground of stress, anxiety, and self-esteem issues. And what does it do to the kids who are excluded from this elite group?

I often cringe when I hear someone counter the name of these kind of programs with the sentiment that “All kids are gifted and talented in their own way.” Because it sounds so trite—the equivalent of a participation award. And yet. At the risk of revealing myself as a special snowflake kind of person, I do believe all children are gifted and talented. Whether they are athletic, artistic, deeply empathetic, or bold leaders, or simply themselves. Platitudes be damned, they are all gifted and talented in their own way.

It’s time to change the labels of these advanced or specialized learning classrooms to reflect that. Our children are paying attention, and they can absolutely read between the lines. What kind of message do we want to send them?

Stephanie is a writer, mother of two girls, early childhood educator and music therapist, and Executive Producer of Listen To Your Mother Denver and Boulder.

Image: an actual shirt that was given to one of our editor’s children.

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Parkrun fanatic ticks off Dumbarton venue in her global quest – Daily Record

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Parkrun has become a global phenomenon and, despite still being in its infancy, Levengrove’s event is already attracting new visitors to Dumbarton.

German Parkrun fanatic Julia Loecherbach is one of those who has travelled to the shadow of the Rock to take on the Levenside venue’s challenging trails.

And for Julia it’s far from the first time she’s travelled for an event.

She told the Lennox Herald: “I’ve now done 44 different Parkruns including some in Germany, Ireland and Poland.

“I’m from Germany originally but since 2012 I’ve lived in Scotland, first in Edinburgh and now because of work I live in Alloa.

“Initially, it was quite a slow burner. I’ve been doing Parkruns since 2013 and that’s how I got into running in the first place.

“It was quite far away from me in Edinburgh and on Saturdays, I was involved in cycling and other things, so it was difficult to have the time. But Parkrun gave me a bit of a focus.

“It was through that and getting involved in social media groups that I realised that Parkrun tourism was a bit of a thing.

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“My partner is Irish and we always look at doing Parkruns when we’re away, but when we were over there we made it our aim to do one in Portrush in Northern Ireland where you actually run along the beach.

“I was also at a conference in Germany which didn’t start until mid-morning, so I printed off the barcode at the hotel and ran down to take part in that. I also had one at my old university which is based near the border with Poland where I just crossed over the border to say that I’d done one there too.

“In Scotland, I was once in Stonehaven for a triathlon and went up a day early to take part in the Parkrun, and I’ve done one in St Andrews when I was doing the Chariots of Fire race as well.”

The amount of events Julia has completed looks even more impressive when you consider that she’s keen to reduce her carbon footprint along the way.

She continued: “I pledged not to fly this year, so I won’t be doing many overseas, but I still have aims.

“Last time I got the train to Germany I went down on the sleeper to London, went on a Parkrun in London and then got the Eurostar into Europe.

“The Parkrun alphabet is also a thing too, so I’m trying to organise a train that stops in York because there are only two Parkruns in the country that start with a Y at the moment.”

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Parkrun tourism is becoming increasingly popular throughout the country, and with new events popping up across the country every week there’s always a new challenge for runners.

Davie Black, who runs the Parkrun Scotland Friends Facebook page which has more than 3000 members, attended Levengrove’s first run – and explained what attracts so many people to Parkrun tourism.

He said: “It’s an incredibly friendly thing to belong to, but it’s been made more addictive since the beginning of Parkrun challenges.

Alloa

“People are keen to do the alphabet, but often they have to travel to Poland as it’s the easiest one to get to that begins with a Z, but there are also plenty of smaller challenges.

“There’s the Staying Alive challenge where you have to do runs beginning with B, then E, E, G, E, E or the pirates challenge which is seven beginning with a C and then an R.

Davie himself is one of a select group of just three (at the time of writing) to have completed all 58 Parkruns in Scotland, whilst he’s crossed the line at 87 different runs – and 520 times at Parkruns in total.

However he refused to pick a favourite.

He said: “Stornoway is one of the most interesting events, the course and the estate it’s on are really interesting.

“Shetland’s Bressay Parkrun is fantastic as well, it’s all run on roads which sounds dangerous but I think in the whole time there I saw two cars!”

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And both visitors were impressed by what Levengrove had to offer runners.

Julia said: “Levengrove Park is really nice, the views are great and I didn’t find it that hilly which was good.

“The paths are quite wide too so you really could say that it’s perfect for a Parkrun.”

Whilst Davie was glowing in his praise of the venue

He added: “It’s a lovely park in a great location and I think it could be a jewel in the crown for Parkrun in Scotland.

“The park has a lot to offer. I’m not usually a fan of laps but there is so much to look at that I didn’t mind.

“When you look up you can see the monuments, the Rock, the river and you can see that it’s a park that has had plenty of investment.”

The appeal of Parkrun is also clear for both Julia and Davie, who urged newcomers to come along.

Julia said: “It’s for everyone, anyone can come along and have a look or volunteer, you don’t have to take part in it, they are totally open to anybody and that’s what makes them so special.”

Davie concluded: “You’re never alone at a Parkrun, that’s what I always say.

“It’s really just people who have met for a blether when a run broke out, and the running part is 50/50 with the social part of it.”

More than 270 attended last week, with co-event director Anna Napier keen to highlight why it was so successful.

She said: “Whether people are walking, jogging, running or volunteering everyone is equally welcome at Parkrun.

“For us it’s about getting as wide a range of people involved as possible, we have some very quick runners, but there are also plenty of people who come along and walk the route, and that takes about an hour.”

To find out more about Levengrove’s Parkrun, visit parkrun.org.uk/levengrove/

For more local news from West Dunbartonshire click here

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‘Runner’ film tells story of refugee turned Olympian. Watch now

Watch: Inspirational documentary ‘Runner’ tells story of refugee who becomes Olympian

Detroit Free Press
Published 7:40 AM EDT Jun 20, 2020

Here’s a chance to watch a documentary that will get your heart racing. 

“Runner” tells the story of Guor Mading Maker, who escaped captivity in his native, war-torn Sudan, where eight of his nine siblings were killed in that country’s civil war. He eventually landed in the U.S., where he began running for his high school track team and later competed in college. Maker (formerly known as Guor Marial) then went on to qualify for the 2012 Olympics — but not without further setbacks and challenges.

“Runner” details Maker’s journey from refugee to world-renowned athlete, using interviews, animated flashbacks and dramatic footage from his racing career. There’s also an emotional reunion with his mother in Sudan after two decades apart.

Anyone interested in viewing the film can rent it for $12 in the screen near the bottom of this page. 

The film won several awards in a festival run in 2019 and early 2020, including the best of fest audience award at Woods Hole Film Festival, the audience award and best documentary jury prize at Naples International Film Festival, the human spirit award at BreckFilmFest and best documentary at Fairhope Film Festival. 

“Runner” tells the story of Guor Mading Maker (formally known as Guor Marial), who ran from captivity in war-torn Sudan to seek safety in the U.S. Maker joined his high school track and field team and eventually qualified for the 2012 Olympics.
“Runner”

Freep Film Festival (the documentary film festival produced by the Detroit Free Press) and Detroit Free Press/TCF Bank Marathon are both presenting partners on the film’s virtual release. Revenues from the rental of the film through this page will be shared with the festival and marathon. The film is also being hosted by more than 120 film festivals, theaters, races and refugee advocacy groups around the country.

Two members of the film’s distribution team, Jenny Feterovich and Steve Bannatyne, were producers on two of the most notable documentaries to have played Freep Film Festival: “The Russian Five” and “Boy Howdy! The Story of Creem Magazine.”

Watch ‘Runner’ documentary here

To watch “Runner,” follow these steps:

1) Press the “Rent $12” icon on the screen above. (Pressing the Play icon will start the film’s trailer.)

2) It’s $12 to watch the film. You’ll be prompted to input your email to create an account, and then enter your credit card. Payments are processed securely via Stripe, a PCI Service Provider Level 1, the most stringent level of certification available. 

3) Once you purchase “Runner,” the film will be available for viewing for 72 hours.

4) Those who rent the film will be sent a link to watch a live Q&A at 9 p.m. Saturday featuring the film’s subject and director. 

4) The link to purchase the film will be available at freep.com through June 25.

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Tributes pour in for philantrophist and former beauty queen, Ibidunni Ighodalo

Tributes have begun to pour in for Ibidun Ighodalo, a former beauty queen and wife of senior pastor of Trinity House Church, Lagos, who died at the age of 39.

The former Miss Lux died in the early hours of June 14 in Port Harcourt, Rivers state. Fans, colleagues and acquaintances have taken to social media platforms, especially Twitter, to bid farewell to the late beauty queen as news of her death spread

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Minneapolis death of George Floyd: Protests escalate; Trump vs Twitter

person

Minneapolis protests escalate as police precinct set on fire, CNN reporter arrested; Trump lashes out at looters on Twitter: What we know

Ryan W. Miller, Jordan Culver, Joel Shannon and Erick Smith
USA TODAY
Published 7:45 AM EDT May 29, 2020

A Minneapolis police precinct was torched late Thursday night as protests intensified following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody this week after a white officer pinned him to the ground under his knee.

Amid the escalating violence, President Donald Trump criticized the city’s mayor and called protesters “thugs.” Twitter later put a public interest notice on that tweet.

Elsewhere in the deeply shaken city, thousands of peaceful demonstrators marched through the streets calling for justice.

There were protests and rallies across the country, too – including New York City, Chicago and Denver. In Louisville, Kentucky, a protest to demand justice for Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old Louisville ER tech shot and killed by police in March, turned violent. Seven people were shot.

Here’s what we know Friday:

State police, national guard clear streets Friday morning

Early Friday, patrols of local and state police and the national guard were clearing the streets around Minneapolis Police’s 3rd Precinct as smoke from the overnight fires billowed.

Video of police and the guard in riot gear and with shields were seen holding lines and marching through the street to push people back.

The heavy police presence came after hours of protests and looting overnight during which little to no police were seen in Minneapolis.

CNN reporter and crew arrested

A CNN reporter and crew were arrested early Friday as state police advanced down a street near the 3rd Precinct.

Correspondent Omar Jimenez was reporting live on “New Day” when police advanced toward him and his crew. Jimenez told police that he was a reporter, showed his credentials and asked where they would like him and the crew to stand so they could continue reporting and be out of their way.

“Put us back where you want us. We are getting out of your way,” Jimenez said. “Wherever you want us, we will go. We were just getting out of your way when you were advancing through the intersection.”

A response by police could not be heard as Jimenez explained the scene. An officer then told Jimenez he was under arrest. Jimenez asked why he was under arrest, but was taken from the scene. The rest of the crew was then arrested as the live shot continued with the camera on the ground.

CNN said later Friday that Jimenez had been released and that Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz apologized for his arrest.

George Floyd video adds to trauma: ‘When is the last time you saw a white person killed online?’

Fires, protesters overtake 3rd precinct

Hours after hundreds of protesters flooded Minneapolis streets – shouting “I can’t breathe” and “no justice, no peace; prosecute the police” – a group of demonstrators overran MPD’s 3rd Precinct, setting “several fires” and forcing officers to evacuate “in the interest of the safety,” according to a police statement.

Protesters celebrated – cheering, honking car horns and setting off fireworks – as fires scorched at the precinct. For hours, police ceded the area to the protesters as windows were smashed, fires lit and buildings looted.

Protesters could be seen setting fire to a Minneapolis Police Department jacket, according to the Associated Press.

Video from Minnesota Public Radio reporter Max Nesterak shared on Twitter showed large crowds around the precinct with rubble and debris thrown about. Nesterak tweeted that Postal Service vehicles were being hijacked.

Follow the George Floyd story: Get USA TODAY’s Daily Briefing in your inbox

Trump calls Mayor Jacob Frey ‘weak,’ Twitter responds with notice

As the city was erupting, President Donald Trump lashed out on Twitter, calling the city’s mayor “very weak” and saying that “thugs are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd.” 

In a tweet just before 1 a.m. ET, Trump said he couldn’t “stand back & watch this happen to a great American City.”

“A total lack of leadership,” Trump tweeted. “Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right.”

Twitter later put a public interest notice on that tweet.

“This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules about glorifying violence. However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public’s interest for the Tweet to remain accessible,” the social media company posted.

Trump’s social media order: Rule means agencies can review whether Twitter, Facebook can be sued for content

National Guard activated

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz earlier Thursday activated the National Guard at the Minneapolis mayor’s request. The Guard tweeted minutes after the precinct burned that it had activated more than 500 soldiers across the metro area.

Photos and video on social media showed the National Guard moving through the streets around the precinct early Friday.

Target closes 24 stores in Minneapolis-St. Paul area ‘until further notice’ 

After multiple videos of looters causing chaos inside a Target store circulated on social media Wednesday night, the Minneapolis-based retailers on Thursday announced closures for 24 of its stores in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. 

All of the closures are “until further notice,” Target said in a statement. 

“We are heartbroken by the death of George Floyd and the pain it is causing our community,” the company said. “At this time, we have made the decision to close a number of our stores until further notice. Our focus will remain on our team members’ safety and helping our community heal.”

Earlier Thursday, dozens of businesses across the Twin Cities boarded up their windows and doors in an effort to prevent looting.

Minneapolis police at center of George Floyd’s death had a history of complaints

Derek Chauvin, the officer fired for kneeling on Floyd’s neck, and officer Tou Thao, who is seen on the video of Floyd’s arrest standing by, have histories of complaints from the public.

Since December 2012, the officers drew a combined 13 complaints. Minneapolis settled at least one lawsuit against Thao. Since 2006, Chauvin has been reviewed for three shootings. 

They were repeatedly accused of treating victims of crimes with callousness or indifference, failing to file a report when a crime was alleged and, in at least one case, using an unnecessary amount of force in making an arrest.

– Kelley Benham French, Kevin Crowe and Katie Wedell

More news on the police death of George Floyd

How did we get here: What happened to George Floyd

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was pinned down by a white police officer who held his knee to Floyd’s neck. The incident was recorded on cellphone video that went viral, sparking outrage nationwide.

Floyd died after pleading with officer Derek Chauvin to remove his knee from Floyd’s neck while police were investigating the use of a counterfeit bill at a corner store. Chauvin and the three others officers involved were fired Tuesday.

– Tyler J. Davis

Rev. Jesse Jackson calls for nationwide protests

“The protests must continue, but around the country … protest until something happens,” the Rev. Jesse Jackson said in a visit to Minneapolis, where he called for murder charges over Floyd’s death. He said protests should respect social distancing protocols to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

The Rev. Al Sharpton and Gwen Carr, the mother of Eric Garner who was killed by an NYPD officer, also came to Minneapolis to speak to protesters. 

Protesters should continue to take action until charges are announced, Jackson said. He said black people have been “brutalized without consequence” for decades. 

– Tyler J. Davis

State and federal authorities promise to investigate Floyd’s death

“That video is graphic and horrific and terrible and no person should do that,” Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said at a press conference. He said investigators needed time to determine if the video showed a criminal offense: “We have to do this right.”

Investigators took an unusual step in announcing an in-progress federal investigation, U.S. Attorney Erica MacDonald said. She joined Freeman and other officials in offering condolences to Floyd’s family and pleading for peaceful protests.

Calling Floyd’s death a “disturbing” loss of life, MacDonald promised a “a robust and meticulous investigation” and said the Department of Justice is making the case a “top priority.”

Contributing: Associated Press; Trevor Hughes, Cara Richardson and Steve Kiggins, USA TODAY.

Read more about George Floyd, the shooting and other news

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Matt Damon says 2011 film ‘Contagion’ predicted pandemic as he reveals stepdaughter had COVID-19

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Matt Damon revealed that his stepdaughter got the coronavirus while going to school in New York City at the onset of the worldwide pandemic.

The actor, 49, appeared for an interview on Ireland’s Spin 1038 “Fully Charged” radio show where he revealed the news of his kid’s illness. The actor has been stuck in Ireland, specifically the small Dublin suburb of Dalkey, for several weeks after travel restrictions took effect while he was there to shoot a movie.

Speaking to hosts Graham O’Toole and Nathan O’Reilly, Damon revealed that his stepdaughter Alexia, 21, was at school in New York City and had the coronavirus along with her roommates a few weeks ago. Alexia is the daughter of Damon’s wife, Luciana Barroso, from a previous relationship.

“Our oldest daughter is in college. Obviously that’s been shut down. But she’s in NYC and she had COVID really early on along with her roommates and got through it fine,” he revealed to the hosts. “So… I shouldn’t say our whole family is together. Of our four kids, we’ve got the three younger ones and our oldest one, we’ll reunite with her at the end of the month. But everybody’s OK.”

Matt Damon revealed that his stepdaughter had the coronavirus.
(Dominique Charriau/WireImage)

Damon’s stepdaughter appears to be out of the woods in terms of her battle with COVID-19. As a result, the actor noted that he’s relieved to be able to reunite with her in Los Angeles in an environment where people finally understand what they’re dealing with.

“Obviously for Luci’s mom and my mom, it’s scary for that generation,” he told the hosts. “I think we’ve all got the message now. Everybody is doing the isolation and social distancing and hand washing and kind of everything we can to mitigate this but it’s frightening, certainly, for our parents.”

The hosts couldn’t help but bring up the parallels of the coronavirus pandemic to a 2011 movie Damon starred in called “Contagion” in that depicted what turned out to be a surprisingly accurate response to a global pandemic. In the movie, Damon plays a father who loses his wife to the illness and must protect his only daughter from it at all costs.

“Anybody who said you couldn’t predict this, I mean, just look at ‘Contagion.’ Ten years ago we made a movie just talking to experts and asking them how this would look and kind of how this would go down,” Damon said.

The actor concluded by noting that he hopes the COVID-19 pandemic will prepare the world for similar outbreaks that may come in the future and be more severe.

“It’s upsetting, the whole thing is just… it’s tragic, you know? And sad,” he told the hosts. “I hope some good can come out of it. I hope that. Luckily, this isn’t as lethal as it might have been, so maybe this is a really good dry run for the big one that might come. Because these things do come along every few decades… best to be ready for it.”

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