Twitter wants to give you more control over your conversations with its new “hide reply” feature

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Last Thursday, Twitter announced that its new options for users to “hide reply” under their tweets has been rolled out globally.

Starting today, you can now hide replies to your Tweets. Out of sight, out of mind. pic.twitter.com/0Cfe4NMVPj

The announcement, which was first made in February and started testing in early July in Canada, Japan, and the US, was discovered by Jane Manchun Wong, a reverse-engineering expert.

Twitter is testing replies moderation. It lets you to hide replies under your tweets, while providing an option to show the hidden replies pic.twitter.com/dE19w4TLtp

— Jane Manchun Wong (@wongmjane) February 28, 2019

This move is coming after Twitter reportedly tested the hiding of likes and the retweet button in its soon-to-be-released new mobile app, twttr — to help read long conversations and threads easier — in March.

This “hide reply” feature will enable users to hide any reply of their choice from the conversations they start. It can also be used to hide replies that are unrelated to the content of the tweet.

“Currently, repliers can shift the topic or tone of a discussion and derail what you and your audience want to talk about. To give you more control over the conversations you start, we tested the option for you to hide replies to your Tweets. We learned that the feature is a useful new way to manage your conversations,” Twitter said in a blog post.

Prior to this new feature being rolled out, users could only control their conversations by muting certain keywords so they didn’t show up in their notifications, or by blocking certain users.

However, with this new feature, the author of the tweets decides which replies stay and which are hidden from other users.

Aside from adding this feature, Twitter Product Lead, Kayvon Beykpour, also says that they are looking at “exploring providing even more control, such as letting you choose only specific people who can reply to your tweet.”

How to hide replies

Once a reply has been hidden, it will be replaced by a notice that says, “This reply has been hidden by the Tweet author” when viewed on the author’s timeline.

Though the hidden replies will be moved to a different page, where other users can view it. Other users can click on the ‘hidden replies’ icon on the tweet and get a list of replies that have been hidden.

Additionally, before a reply is totally hidden, Twitter will ask if you would like to block the owner of the account whose reply you hid. The person whose comment was hidden will also be able to see that the comment is no longer available.

How to unhide a reply

This feature is available on Twitter for iOS, Android, and twitter.com, but not on Tweetdeck.

Considering that Facebook and Instagram are testing the hiding of likes, it appears that social media platforms are looking to make their apps less toxic for users.

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North now offers Focals smart glasses fittings and purchases via app

North’s Focals smart glasses are the first in the category to even approach mainstream appeal, but to date, the only way to get a pair has been to go into a physical North showroom and get a custom fitting, then return once they’re ready for a pickup and final adjustment. Now, North has released its Showroom app, which makes Focals available across the U.S. and Canada without an in-person appointment.

This approach reduces considerable friction, and it’s able to do so thanks to technology available on board the iPhone X or later — essentially the same tech that makes Face ID possible. People can go through the sizing and fitting process using these later model iPhones (and you can borrow a friend’s if you’re on Android or an older iOS device) and then North takes those measurements and can produce either prescription or non-prescription Focals, shipped directly to your door after a few weeks.

The Showroom app also includes an AR-powered virtual try-on feature for making sure you like the look of the frames, and for picking out your favorite color. Once the Focals show up at your door, the final fitting process is also something you can do at home, guided by the app’s directions for getting the fit just right.

Should you still want to hit an actual physical showroom, North’s still going to be operating its Brooklyn and Toronto storefronts, and will be operating pop-ups across North America as well.

Focals began shipping earlier this year, bringing practical smart notification, guidance and other software experiences to your field of view via a tiny projector and in-lens transparent display. North, which previously existed as Thalmic Labs and created the Myo gesture control armband, recognized that they were building control devices optimized for exactly this kind of application, but also found that no one was yet getting wearable tech like smart glasses right. Last year, Thalmic Labs pivoted to become North and focus on Focals as a result.

Since launching its smart glasses to consumers, it’s been iterating the software to consistently add new features, and making them more accessible to customers. An early price drop significantly lessened sticker shock, and now removing the requirement to actually visit a location in person to both order and collect the glasses should help expand their customer base further still.

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