Nigeria records 663 highest daily confirmed cases of COVID-19

Hello and thank you for joining us on the mid-week edition of Journalists’ Hangout with Ayodele Ozugbakun, Babajide Kolade-Otitoju and Solomon Ajuziogu.

Today on the programme… Nigeria records 663 highest daily confirmed cases of COVID-19, as Anambra State provides more isolation centres, intensifies treatment ahead of peak in infections, Death toll in Boko Haram attack on Zowo, Borno State rises to 82, and later on the show, Journalists’ Hangout Midweek Special focuses on the adverse effects of COVID-19 on sports betting.

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#COVID19 #Lockdown #BokoHaram
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Man Tries To Penetrate Lady’s Skirt In Public Car | Issue Of Rape In Nigeria

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Your View, June 3, 2020 (Full show)

Still on the viral video of this lady who was continuously assaulted in a public car from Abuja to Akure by a male passenger. She reported the man to a soldier who told her to keep quiet or be detained at a Covid isolation center; after the molester spoke to him in Hausa. #YourViewTVC #AbujaToAkure

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Nigerian Navy inaugurates Isolation centre in Lagos

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The Nigerian Navy has inaugurated isolation centre in Lagos state to help in the fight against coronavirus.

#COVID19 #Coronavirus #IsolationCentre

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Man Tries To Penetrate Lady’s Skirt In Public Car | Issue Of Rape In Nigeria

person chair

Your View, June 3, 2020 (Full show)

Still on the viral video of this lady who was continuously assaulted in a public car from Abuja to Akure by a male passenger. She reported the man to a soldier who told her to keep quiet or be detained at a Covid isolation center; after the molester spoke to him in Hausa. #YourViewTVC #AbujaToAkure

Watch TVC on GOTV Ch. 27, StarTimes Ch. 121, PLAY TV Ch. 801, UHF Ch. 49

Subscribe to TVC: https://bit.ly/2PWLUir

Watch TVC Live: https://bit.ly/1nms2zw

Check out TVC website: http://tvcentertainment.tv

Follow TVC on social media: @TVCconnect

Like TVC on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tvcconnect

Follow TVC on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tvcconnect

Follow TVC on Instagram: http://instagram.com/tvcconnect

More videos from the TVC network: http://Youtube.com/tvcentertainment.tv

This content was originally published here.

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Matt Damon says 2011 film ‘Contagion’ predicted pandemic as he reveals stepdaughter had COVID-19

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Fox News Flash top entertainment and celebrity headlines are here. Check out what’s clicking today in entertainment.

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Matt Damon revealed that his stepdaughter got the coronavirus while going to school in New York City at the onset of the worldwide pandemic.

The actor, 49, appeared for an interview on Ireland’s Spin 1038 “Fully Charged” radio show where he revealed the news of his kid’s illness. The actor has been stuck in Ireland, specifically the small Dublin suburb of Dalkey, for several weeks after travel restrictions took effect while he was there to shoot a movie.

Speaking to hosts Graham O’Toole and Nathan O’Reilly, Damon revealed that his stepdaughter Alexia, 21, was at school in New York City and had the coronavirus along with her roommates a few weeks ago. Alexia is the daughter of Damon’s wife, Luciana Barroso, from a previous relationship.

“Our oldest daughter is in college. Obviously that’s been shut down. But she’s in NYC and she had COVID really early on along with her roommates and got through it fine,” he revealed to the hosts. “So… I shouldn’t say our whole family is together. Of our four kids, we’ve got the three younger ones and our oldest one, we’ll reunite with her at the end of the month. But everybody’s OK.”

Matt Damon revealed that his stepdaughter had the coronavirus.
(Dominique Charriau/WireImage)

Damon’s stepdaughter appears to be out of the woods in terms of her battle with COVID-19. As a result, the actor noted that he’s relieved to be able to reunite with her in Los Angeles in an environment where people finally understand what they’re dealing with.

“Obviously for Luci’s mom and my mom, it’s scary for that generation,” he told the hosts. “I think we’ve all got the message now. Everybody is doing the isolation and social distancing and hand washing and kind of everything we can to mitigate this but it’s frightening, certainly, for our parents.”

The hosts couldn’t help but bring up the parallels of the coronavirus pandemic to a 2011 movie Damon starred in called “Contagion” in that depicted what turned out to be a surprisingly accurate response to a global pandemic. In the movie, Damon plays a father who loses his wife to the illness and must protect his only daughter from it at all costs.

“Anybody who said you couldn’t predict this, I mean, just look at ‘Contagion.’ Ten years ago we made a movie just talking to experts and asking them how this would look and kind of how this would go down,” Damon said.

The actor concluded by noting that he hopes the COVID-19 pandemic will prepare the world for similar outbreaks that may come in the future and be more severe.

“It’s upsetting, the whole thing is just… it’s tragic, you know? And sad,” he told the hosts. “I hope some good can come out of it. I hope that. Luckily, this isn’t as lethal as it might have been, so maybe this is a really good dry run for the big one that might come. Because these things do come along every few decades… best to be ready for it.”

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Journalism without borders: why we are deepening our Europe coverage | World news | The Guardian

In the depth of the financial and economic crisis that was causing misery across much of southern Europe, particularly in 2011, I set off on a reporting trip that contained the germ of what, nearly a decade later, would find expression in This is Europe.

A significant new commitment to deepen the Guardian’s coverage of Europe, This is Europe is a new editorial strand aiming to explore the challenges confronting the continent, that respect no national borders, and how countries are responding to them.

Europe on the Breadline, a four-country road trip in search of some of the human stories behind the impersonal data of the eurozone crisis, took me from food banks and protest marches in Lisbon to the birth of a national citizens’ movement in Málaga.




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In Naples I met a youth worker whose projects with children in difficulty had been hammered by austerity; in Thessaloniki, a professor whose research budget had been slashed by 60% – and a young start-upper determined to succeed regardless.

That series, which led to a second one, this time confined to Greece, talking to those Greeks who were organising to help themselves, was an early attempt at the kind of transnational reporting implied in my current job title – and which This is Europe now aims to take a good deal further.

The whole idea of transnational reporting (journalisme sans frontières, anyone?) recognises that media organisations tend to report the EU from the institutions in Brussels, and from member states in isolation.

Only occasionally have we tried to make sense of issues across Europe – from the climate crisis to data security, migration to the rise of the far right, the working poor to caring for an ageing population, tax avoidance to the urban/rural divide.

It is an issue I have always been aware of, and tried to address before the paper created the role of roving Europe correspondent in 2016.

In 2013, I went back to Thessaloniki and Málaga – with a stop-off in Bologna – to talk to members of southern Europe’s “lost generation”: the 59%, 56% and 40% of under-25s who were then out of work in, respectively, Greece, Spain and in Italy.

In 2014 I made a tour of the populist, Eurosceptic and mainly far-right parties in France, Germany, the Netherlands and Finland that were looking to make major gains in the run-up to the European parliamentary elections of that year.

In 2015, we tried a different approach: for an article published on international labour day, 1 May, about workers taking over their factories, I reported from southern France and Greece, and Guardian colleagues contributed pieces from Spain and Turkey.

In similar efforts, for packages in 2018 and this year on the far-reaching impact of the rise of short-term rental platforms such as Airbnb, and overtourism in general, on Europe’s most historic cities, I wrote about Amsterdam and colleagues covered Berlin, Barcelona, Florence and Prague.




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But all of this has really only been a taster of what we could accomplish, and, over the past three years, my time – and that of many of our correspondents – has been massively taken up by Brexit, leaving precious little bandwidth to think of much else. This is Europe aims to rectify that.

Why is it transnational reporting important? Because it is only when you start comparing and contrasting how different countries are experiencing the same challenges, and how they are addressing them, that you start to see who is doing well, who has developed best practice.

It allows you, for example, to discover that perhaps surprisingly, Finland leads the way in tackling both fake news and homelessness. That France has a hugely successful consumers’ cooperative that is beginning to ensure farmers get paid a fair price for the food they produce.

And that while it may represent a potentially existential challenge to winemakers in Bordeaux, global heating represents a startling opportunity for their colleagues – and, in the not too distant future, rivals – in Scandinavia.

This is Europe: a new Guardian series

This is Europe is a new stream of Guardian journalism that investigates the big challenges that transcend national boundaries, and seeks out the solutions that could benefit us all. These are testing times, and crises are not limited by national borders. But then neither are we.

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Migration, climate, populism and contagious diseases are continent-wide problems. When we report on them through a pan-European lens, we not only understand the challenges better but can tease out solutions wherever they crop up: health in Denmark, for example, or teenage wellbeing in the Netherlands.

We’ve been talking about something similar to This is Europe for years at the Guardian, and now we’re doing it.

It’s a shame Brexit had to happen first, of course. But if we can now report Europe as Europe – as a continent rising (we hope) individually and collectively to the cross-border challenges it faces – more concretely and more informatively, that will be a small consolation.

Be part of the conversation. Sign up to the This is Europe email list to get a weekly selection of the most pressing stories and debates for Europeans – from identity to economics to the environment.

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UK’s coronavirus death toll rises by 684 to 3,605 in biggest jump yet – Mirror Online

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The UK’s coronavirus death toll has soared to 3,605 after 684 patients died in just 24 hours – the biggest single day increase yet.

The figure does not include people who have died at home. The previous total stood at 2,921 deaths.

The number of confirmed cases has increased to 38,168 after 4,450 more people tested positive.

Most of the deaths have been in England (3,244), followed by Scotland (172), Wales (141) and Northern Ireland (48).

Two NHS nurses, who were both mothers in their 30s with three young children, are among the latest patients to die after battling Covid-19 in hospital.

The grim news came as Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who is back at work after battling the virus, said the Government expects the virus to peak in Britain in the next few weeks and Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who is still infected with Covid-19 and isolating, urged people to stick with social distancing in a bid to flatten the curve.

Have you been affected by coronavirus? Email webnews@mirror.co.uk.

Aimee O'Rourke

The Department of Health said: “As of 9am on 3 April 2020, 173,784 people have been tested, of which 38,168 were confirmed positive.

“As of 5pm on 2 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 3,605 have died.”

Public Health England said 11,764 tests were carried out on Thursday in England, while testing capacity for inpatient care in the country currently stands at 12,799 tests per day.

Two NHS nurses were among the latest patients to die.

BBC Radio 4

Mum-of-three Areema Nasreen, 36, was in intensive care on a ventilator after testing positive for the virus.

She worked at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

In Kent, Aimee O’Rourke, 38, died at the Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate, where she worked.

The mum-of-three was hailed as a “brave angel” as her family said in a tribute: “Aimee was a beautiful woman and a valued NHS nurse.”

Boris Johnson

More than 10,000 tests carried out

Friday’s figures from the Department of Health show that for the second day running more than 10,000 new people were tested in the UK for coronavirus.

A total of 10,590 new people were reported as being tested in the 24 hours to 9am April 3.

The equivalent figure for April 2 was 10,215.

The total number of people in the UK tested since the outbreak began is now 173,784.

This is the equivalent of around 261 people in every 100,000, or 0.3% of the population.

The number of coronavirus-related hospital deaths reported by the Department of Health stood at 3,605 as of 5pm April 2.

It took 19 days for this number to pass 300. It has taken further 11 days to pass 3,000.

Meanwhile, the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK has taken two weeks to go from just under 4,000 (3,983 as of 9am March 20) to just under 40,000 (38,168 as of 9am April 3).

Commenting on the death of Ms Nasreen, Mr Hancock said: “I pay tribute to the NHS staff who’ve died serving the NHS, serving the nation.

“It shows the incredible bravery of every member of the NHS who goes into work knowing that these dangers are there.

“I think it is a testament to every doctor and nurse and paramedic and other health professional who is working in the NHS in these difficult times.

“And I think the whole nation is grateful.”

About 35,000 front-line NHS staff are not currently in work due to coronavirus, said Mr Hancock.

He said testing figures for health staff “should” rise to thousands a day in the next few weeks.

The Government has set a goal of testing 100,000 people a day across the whole of the UK by the end of April following widespread criticism of its testing strategy.

The Prime Minister’s spokesman said the 5,000-plus NHS staff who had been tested had mainly been tested at new testing sites.

Health Secretary

A total of 172 patients have died in Scotland after testing positive for coronavirus, up by 46 from 126 on Thursday.

3,001 people have now tested positive for the virus in Scotland, up from 2,602 the day before.

Officials said 176 people are in intensive care with coronavirus or coronavirus symptoms, and increase of 14 on Thursday.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon warned: “I want to be very clear that nothing I have seen gives me any basis whatsoever for predicting the virus will peak as early as a week’s time here in Scotland.”

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A total of 24 patients have died after testing positive for coronavirus in Wales, bringing the total number of deaths in the country to 141, health officials said.

Public Health Wales said 345 new cases had tested positive for Covid-19, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in Wales to 2,466.

Dr Robin Howe, from Public Health Wales, said “345 new cases have tested positive for Covid-19 in Wales, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 2,466, although the true number of cases is likely to be higher”.

Dr Howe added: “Twenty-four further deaths have been reported to us of people who had tested positive for Covid-19, taking the number of deaths in Wales to 141.

Louisa Jordan

“We offer our condolences to families and friends affected, and we ask those reporting on the situation to respect patient confidentiality.”

The Welsh Government will introduce a law compelling all employers to make sure their workers keep two metres apart, Wales’ First Minister has said.

Mark Drakeford said the social distancing legislation, the first in the UK, would require bosses to “put the needs of their workforce first” when it comes into force on Monday or Tuesday of next week.

The number of people who have died in Northern Ireland after contracting coronavirus has risen by 12 to 48, health officials said.

Testing has resulted in 130 new positive cases, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in the region to 904.

Manchester's Central Complex

In England, two siblings of Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab, the 13-year-old London boy who died after testing positive for coronavirus, have also developed symptoms, according to a family friend who launched an online appeal.

The development means Ismail’s mother and six siblings are forced to self-isolate and cannot attend his funeral in Brixton on Friday, Mark Stephenson said.

Meanwhile, Prince Charles, who tested positive for coronavirus last month, officially opened the NHS Nightingale Hospital at the ExCeL centre in east London.

The Prince of Wales, 71, appeared via video-link from his Scottish home of Birkhall and spoke to those gathered at the entrance of the new temporary hospital.

He said: “It is without doubt a spectacular and almost unbelievable feat of work in every sense, from its speed of construction – in just nine days as we’ve heard – to its size and the skills of those who have created it.

Mark Stephenson

NHS Nightingale Hospital – the facts

The NHS Nightingale Hospital has been built in east London in the ExCel convention centre.

The facility will be used to treat Covid-19 patients transferred from intensive care units across London

Just one ward will need 200 members of staff

“An example, if ever one was needed, of how the impossible could be made possible and how we can achieve the unthinkable through human will and ingenuity.”

Charles added: “The creation of this hospital is above all the result of an extraordinary collaboration and partnership between NHS managers, the military and all those involved to create a centre on a scale that has never been seen before in the United Kingdom.

“To convert one of the largest national conference centres into a field hospital, starting with 500 beds with a potential of 4,000, is quite frankly incredible.”

The prince and Mr Hancock both recently ended self-isolation after contracting the virus and Charles commented on the fact they had recovered.

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He said: “Now I was one of the lucky ones to have Covid-19 relatively mildly and if I may say so I’m so glad to see the Secretary of State has also recovered, but for some it will be a much harder journey.”

Shortly after he spoke, Buckingham Palace confirmed the Queen has recorded a special broadcast on the coronavirus outbreak to be broadcast on Sunday night.

Previously, it was said that the 93-year-old monarch, who is isolating with Prince Philip, 98, at Windsor Castle, was preparing to make a televised address to calm the nation’s nerves, but was waiting for the “right moment” to address the country.

Mr Hancock, meanwhile, praised all those involved in the setting up of the hospital, adding the “extraordinary project”, the core of which was completed in just nine days, was a “testament to the work and the brilliance of the many people involved”.

Matt Hancock

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Add your partial postcode (eg: CF5 1) to put a heart on the map and you can add a thank you message too.

If you’re an NHS worker, you’ll also find a handy list of all the places and brands currently offering you well-deserved discounts.

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He also praised the NHS and the way its staff are dealing with the virus crisis.

The Health Secretary said: “In these troubled times with this invisible killer stalking the whole world, the fact that in this country we have the NHS is even more valuable than before.”

Asked about the number of ventilators currently in use and how many are expected to arrive next week, Mr Hancock said: “We’ve obviously got a big programme to ramp up the number of ventilators and we now have more ventilators than we had before.

“And we’re going to need them for this hospital and I’m just going to go and have a look at that now.”

Pressed for exact numbers, Mr Hancock did not respond.

Northern Ireland

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme earlier, Mr Hancock said it is unclear whether he is now immune to Covid-19.

He described having coronavirus as a “pretty unpleasant experience” with an “incredibly” sore throat and a feeling of “having glass in my throat”.

He said he has lost half a stone in weight.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson remained in isolation in Downing Street after testing positive for the virus.

He was “feeling better” but still had a fever on Friday.

nurse and paramedic

In a video on social media, the Prime Minister urged the public to stick with social distancing and not be tempted to “hang out” in the warmer weather predicted for this weekend.

“In my own case, although I’m feeling better and I’ve done my seven days of isolation, alas I still have one of the symptoms, a minor symptom, I still still have a temperature,” he said.

“So, in accordance with government advice I must continue my self-isolation until that symptom itself goes.”

Mr Johnson said people must not be tempted to break social distancing rules as the weather warms up even if they were going “a bit stir crazy”

In England, more than 26.7 million units of personal protection equipment (PPE) were delivered to 281 NHS “trusts and providers” on Thursday, Downing Street confirmed.

Prime Minister

Mr Johnson’s spokesman said: “That included 7.8 million aprons, 1.7 million masks and 12.4 million gloves.”

It follows the new guidance issued by Public Health England about the level of protection health staff should wear depending on the patient situation.

There would be no new guidance published on the public wearing masks or face coverings when out of the house, said the spokesman.

The spokesman said “surveillance” of the population to determine the spread of coronavirus was ongoing, with 3,500 antibody tests carried out per week.

“This is a population surveillance programme which we have been carrying out since February,” said the spokesman.

“It is being done by Public Health England at their campus which is at Porton Down.

“We currently have capacity for 3,500 of these surveillance tests to be carried out this week which is enough for small-scale population sampling.”

Two newly-planned temporary hospital sites have been agreed at the University of the West of England and the Harrogate Convention Centre.

They will join other sites due to open at Birmingham’s National Exhibition Centre and Manchester’s Central Complex.

Construction of a temporary hospital called the NHS Louisa Jordan is underway in Glasgow.

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Against the Death Cult: We Must Not Let Ruthless Ideologues Destroy the Climate and Kill Us All

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Agriculture

The Niger delta is burning. The oil companies plumbing the river basin of its black gold have found an ingenious way of dealing with the natural gas they consider a waste by-product of the extraction process. Capturing the gas would be costly, inefficient – so instead, they flare it off. Across the delta, towers of flame burn day and night, some of them stretching ten storeys into the sky.

Gas flaring was officially banned in Nigeria in 1984 – but still, two million people live within four kilometres of a flare site, at risk of the cancers, neurological, reproductive and respiratory problems linked to the pollutants released into the air. The soil is hotter, and crop yields have dwindled; “You plant, and before you know it, everything is dead”. When the rains come, they are black. Oil spills spew from the pipelines of Shell and ENI, the biggest operators in the area. Shell has reported 17.5 million litres lost since 2011; Amnesty International say that’s likely a hefty underestimate. The spills have poisoned drinking water, and destroyed the livelihoods of the fishermen who once combed the delta. 

We are over the brink. People have already lost their lives to hurricanes and bush fires and flooding, to toxins and crop failures – all disasters rooted in fossil-fuel dependent extractive capitalism, bankrolled by a deregulated financial sector. People continue to lose their lives. Global temperatures soar, and a monstrous future slouches towards us from the ecocidal imaginations of the handful of humans directly invested in a doctrine of global annihilation. Now, the death drive built into the heart of our economy reveals itself in ever more undeniable terms; the skull is showing through the skin. 

Scientists at ExxonMobil confirmed the truth of climate change in the 1980s, at the very latest. Since then, Exxon and its fellow fossil fuel companies have spent decades sponsoring climate change denial and blocking efforts to legislate against apocalypse. Under their auspices, newspapers and broadcasters and politicians revelled in a vicious subterfuge disguised as pious gnosticism; asking how we can know for sure that climate change is caused by human activity. In recent years, this strategy has buckled under the weight of public outrage and scientific proof.

The science is clear: only an ambitious, rapid overhaul of the fundaments of our economy gives us hope of survival. And that hope is tantalisingly within our grasp. We have the technology, and we have the financial capacity; all that’s missing is the political will to give those solutions heft, muscle and cold hard cash.

Now, culprit companies are suddenly flouting their green credentials to shore up their position as custodians of the future. Shell Oil has made a big song and dance about its investments in green technology. Goldman Sachs has funded research into how to make cities “resilient to climate change”. These are little more than attempts to seduce and cajole worried publics and skittish investors. Still these companies hoard over-valued assets, continue ploughing resources into carbon-heavy industries, show no signs of leaving enough fossil fuels in the ground to avoid the breakdown of the climate, the potential collapse of civilisation and the extinction of life on earth. Negotiators were banned from mentioning climate change in recent UK-US trade talks. the UK government has subsidised the fossil fuel industry to the tune of 10bn in a decade, and its legislators continue to take its lobby money in return. They defend their right to starve out and flood and burn chunks of human existence – and make money doing it. 

We are being held hostage by a cabal of ruthless ideologues whose only loyalty is to a doctrine of global death. Their success thrives on silence, isolation, manipulation, denial. They are united in their opposition to reality, in their determination to hunt down or hound out real alternatives that threaten their mortal stranglehold on power. All other doctrines are heresy, and their preachers envoys of a sinister delusion. They are unique guardians of a dark and dazzling reality.

If this took place among a handful of hippies beckoning oblivion from the heat haze of a california desert we would call it is: a death cult. Instead, it is orchestrated from sumptuous glass towers, from the velvet inner chambers of parliament – so we call it business as usual. 

To these science-backed suggestions that economic alternatives are possible – even urgent, necessary, beautiful – they react with vitriol and incredulity. Saving the world may sound appealing, but it clashes intolerably with the cultish diktat: ‘There Is No Alternative”. Partisans of the Green New Deal like Alexandra Ocasio Cortez are dismissed at best as well-meaning dreamers or childish hysterics, and, at worst, nightmarish envoys of backdoor totalitarianism. Indeed, grassroots activists have been murdered for organising against big polluters. The political allegiances are clear: Defending life is foolish. Annihilation is inevitable. We have only to accept it graciously, to walk into its arms.

Rightwing politicians barter casually about the difference between a decarbonisation target of 2030, 2045, 2050, 2060 as a matter of messaging and electoral success. As though that difference were not cashed out in millions of deaths. Such differences slide off the sunny, addled mind of the cultist, for whom life and death are indistinguishable. 

A chosen few will be spared; the golden ones who walk in the light. As the asset-stripping and plundering continues apace, so the market for luxury disaster insurance packages has grown, with companies offering high-tech flood defences, private firefighters, private security to guard against mobs of looters. Theirs is a gilded world where disaster can never truly happen to them – because it never truly has. That no insurance policy in the world will provide them with breathable air or sustainable agriculture is a matter for the others, the ghosts, the un-living, those whose existence never really registered. Us.   

Broadcasters tried to haul Boris Johnson before the court of the living on Thursday night for the climate change debate, to account for Conservative policy proposals which present a 50% risk of tipping the world into irreversible, runaway climate breakdown, to account for his fossil fuel backers. He responded by threatening them with censure and legal action. Cult leaders can tolerate no scrutiny of their fragile world picture, no challenge to their power. 

We can break the stranglehold, and commit the death cultists to the bleak annals of history where they belong. It is time to choose only those who have chosen life.   

Eleanor Penny is a writer and a regular contributor to Novara Media. 

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I Attempted Suicide When I Was Married – Nollywood Actress Padita Agu Speaks On Her Failed Marriage

Padita Agu
Padita Agu

Nollywood actress Padita Agu has taken to social media to open up on her failed marriage.

The actress via her YouTube page opened up on how she met and married her ex-husband alongside the three-year-old marriage was torturous for her.

According to the actress;

”This guy and I have been talking over the phone and we got to the point of agreeing to be married. So he decided to sell me this wonderful idea, that how about we go on some adventure, let’s get married the very first day we get to see because all this while we have been talking, I don’t remember his face. I haven’t seen him. He just saw me once when I came to my friend’s place to console her. He might I see me in my movies, I don’t know. All I know is that at this point, we don’t really know each other. We haven’t seen each other but we have been talking over the phone. I don’t remember his face, I don’t remember how he looks but we have been talking so we are so familiar but not just facially.

So he said okay, how about we try some adventure, we arrange marriage and we just see ourselves right at the registry when we are getting married. I was like wow, that’s deep, that is serious. I was like what would my family say? What would I say to them> I was just scared but excited at the same time. So he said for my family, we don’t have to tell them about the secret marriage. So once we are done, we would go and meet them as though we were just dating and we tell them we want to get married and we take it from there.

Read Also: A Broken Heart Fixes Your Vision: Blossom Chukwujekwu

So once we get married, maybe years later, if we had kids and all that, we can now open up to them and say ‘oh, by the way, we had a secret wedding. At that point, it wouldn’t matter because then, we are already married. And as for him and I, once we do it and we meet ourselves and we realise we don’t want this anymore, as quietly as we did it, we would just go and undo it.

So I thought to myself, there is no harm in this. If we don’t want it again, we dissolve it quietly like he said and my family don’t have to know because eventually, we would wed properly. So, I thought it was a nice idea.

So, I went to the registry because he was out of the country at the time. I went to the registry, got us registered. The day came, it was my birthday. He also chose my birthday to make it special. So I felt wow, this is amazing. That day I didn’t tell anyone. In between, he told me not to tell anyone. that if I tell people, nobody would encourage it for some negative reason. Some might be jealous.

On the wedding day, I arrived at the registry with a cab. He arrived with a cab. The cabman who brought me signed as my witness while the one who brought him signed as his witness. and we wedded. From there, we went to see my family to tell them we were dating and wanted to get married.

The marriage lasted for three years and that three year is the worst I have ever gone through in my almost four decades of living to the point I attempted suicide. I just wanted to kill myself and end it. There was this thing about actresses not staying in marriage so I just couldn’t see myself leaving and so I just wanted to stay there. Since I couldn’t leave, I thought I should just end this whole trouble. I know some of you would be like this is why this girl left the industry. Yes, this is why I left the industry. He didn’t tell me to leave directly but indirectly, he got me out of the industry, cut me off everyone, everything…my career, my school, my family, friends…except friends he was okay with them”

On lessons she learnt, she said;

1. Never give in to pressure be it parental, peer group or societal.

2. Never assume you are familiar with someone you are chatting on talking with on the phone or social media. This goes to people in long distant relationships. Never commit deeply until you see that person.

3. Never settle for a spouse you are not compatible with

4. Never leave in Isolation.

The post I Attempted Suicide When I Was Married – Nollywood Actress Padita Agu Speaks On Her Failed Marriage appeared first on Information Nigeria.

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Rosanna Arquette: They said I was a pain in the ass. Its not true

Ever since she was abused by Harvey Weinstein, Rosanna Arquette says she has lived in fear. She talks about harassment, the collapse of her career and the thin line between caution and paranoia

Celebrity

Rosanna Arquette sounds panicked. She thinks someone wants to stop our conversation taking place. For 30 minutes, a BBC publicist has tried to patch us into a conference call; now, Arquette has taken matters into her own hands and phoned me directly. This is what happens! All the time! she says, her voice rising. There are no pleasantries. Its as if we were already talking before I picked up.

Why is it disconnecting every time? she asks. There is something strange here. Really strange. I dont understand whats happening. Why cant we get on the phone with each other? She laughs, a nervous sort of placeholder laugh.

I hesitate before going along with her idea that we have been sabotaged. I had assumed a minor technical hitch. Who would want to stop her talking to me? About a Harvey Weinstein documentary? she scoffs. A lot of people!

It would be easy to put Arquettes panic down to paranoia. But as the BBC documentary Untouchable: The Rise and Fall of Harvey Weinstein shows, paranoia is an utterly reasonable response to what she has been through. Directed by Ursula Macfarlane, the film explores how Weinstein deployed power, right back to his school years. Along with fellow actors and former employees of Weinstein, Arquette contributes her own experience of his alleged sexual abuse. I guess you have to say allegedly, she says. Weinstein denies any non-consensual sexual encounters.

What Arquette didnt know, until one of the producers took the finished film to her house, was that the Israeli intelligence firm Black Cube had put together a profile of her for Weinstein. Phones and getting into computers and emails disappearing that stuff continues, she says (she doesnt suggest Black Cube is involved). She is grateful to Macfarlane for a great job. But a lot of people have made a lot of money on the backs of our pain, she says, with the same sad laugh. I think the word pain has triggered the laugh, and she could be crying.

Arquette was one of the first women to share details of Weinsteins abuse, with Ronan Farrow in the New Yorker and in the New York Times with Jodi Kantor, in October 2017. When the makers of Untouchable contacted her, Everybody was in so much fear, they didnt want to speak, she says. But how do you not?

Arquette
Star on the rise Arquette with Madonna in Desperately Seeking Susan, 1985. Photograph: Allstar/ORION PICTURES

On camera, she tells of the time in the early 1990s when she arrived at the Beverly Hills hotel in Los Angeles for a meeting with Weinstein. As she does and this is something other interviewees in the film do she grabs her own wrist and jerks her body back, her hands rising defensively as she mimics his voice; acting, in short, as if Weinstein is physically there, and that she must also play his part.

Thats what trauma is, she says to be recurrently plunged back into the moment that Weinstein, in his white bathrobe, tried to draw her hand first to his achy neck, then his penis. What a relief it must have been to reach the safety of the lift.

I was never safe, she counters. From the moment I was told that I was supposed to have dinner with him and then I was told: Mr Weinstein will see you upstairs. My heart started racing. Mmmmm. She makes a sound, a sort of verbal malfunction, an alarm that wont stop. Of course she didnt feel safe. She doesnt feel safe now.

Arquette stayed rooted in the doorway of Weinsteins room. She did not go in. That would have been fucked. Game over! But before she fled, he warned her she says this in a deep voice Rosanna, youre making a very big mistake. She says he named two women whom he claimed had gone along with him in order to advance their careers. One has since told her own story, making it clear that she in fact rebuffed Weinstein, so Arquette sees no harm in naming her.

Gwyneth Paltrow, she says. He said to me: Look what Ive done for Gwyneth Paltrow. Gwyneth Paltrow was with Brad Pitt! She had a career! Theres no way she made a deal with Harvey!

But the claim must have weighed on Arquette because, she says, two years ago, when Farrows investigation appeared, she phoned Paltrow.And I said: I just needed you to know what he said to me.

And what did Paltrow say?

She laughed. She said: Yeah, Ive heard that!

Of course, many people had heard many things about Weinstein. Silence was never the problem. I told many people, Arquette says. Who? I told Jane Fonda years ago. She listened to me and she was concerned I talked. I didnt stop talking.

Weinstein
Weinstein in court in a clip from Untouchable: The Rise and Fall of Harvey Weinstein. Photograph: Getty/BBC/LT2 Films LTD

Rose McGowan talked, too, because Arquette heard her account of being raped by Weinstein long before Farrows article in 2017; Arquette shared her own experience with a third party, who shared it with McGowan. All these semi-private conversations built a kind of common knowledge, and that was why Farrow knew to approach her, she says. But we were in such a fearful place. Even as she walked away from Weinsteins corridor and returned to the lobby in the lift, she thought: Hes going to take me down.

Arquette has appeared in more than 70 films but the notable ones are Desperately Seeking Susan (1985), The Big Blue (1988), Pulp Fiction (1994) and Crash (1996) all long ago. Well, like Mira Sorvino says, [Weinstein] took a big chunk of our time in our lives There was a significant drop in careers. Weve gone from the top of A-lists to bottom of the C-minus list within minutes. Gossip … A dinner party Be careful, shes a pain in the ass People listen to that. And its not true!

Pulp Fiction (produced by Weinsteins company Miramax) did come two years after the alleged assault; Arquette wanted to work with Quentin Tarantino. But I never made a penny from it, she says. Im the only famous actor who didnt have a back-end deal [a share of the profits]. And this was a time when I should have

You were A-list, I say. I hate saying that, she says. I suspect she finds it immodest.

She has no evidence that Weinstein warned others against her (though Peter Jackson has admitted to blacklisting Sorvino and Ashley Judd under pressure from Weinstein). And there was always work. Even if it was a bad television movie shooting up in Canada, she says with that same dry laugh. You have to pay the bills when youre a single mum. (Her daughter, Zo Bleu Sidel, is 24 and, according to Arquette: She can run circles around any Arquette as an actor. Zos father, restaurateur John Sidel, was the second of Arquettes four husbands. She has been married to Todd Morgan, an investment banker, since 2013.)

In Hollywood, Arquette always felt isolated. For a long time, she had no agent, though she has a wonderful one now. I never really played the game, doing what it takes to be a star, to keep your mouth shut. I wonder if the other Arquette siblings Patricia, David (whom she says she speaks to most often), Alexis and Richmond shared her sense of isolation? Well, I dont think Patricia does! she shoots back. Shes right there at the top of the field in the game right now.

The speed of her response makes me wonder if it was a competitive household growing up; all the siblings acted. But she says: Ive never experienced that in our family. Theres a pause. Wait a minute, what am I saying? My dad [Lewis Arquette] had a kind of weird competitiveness with me that I never felt was super-supportive. Everybody would say: Your dad is so proud of you! And Id say: Oh, he is? Well, thats nice! But he was a struggling actor who never really made it and then his kids all became, you know, stars.

Acting
Acting is in the family (l to r) Alexis, Rosanna, Richmond, Patricia and David, 2006. Photograph: SGranitz/WireImage

When her trans sister Alexis wanted to be a woman, I always had a joke. I said: You think you have a hard time getting work as an actor? Wait till youre a woman! We had a big laugh over that.

A long outward breath ripples down the phone. Im just trying to get my thoughts in order, she says quietly. Its really hard not to be paranoid when you find out that youve been spied on. She goes back to the earlier hitch with the phone call. So what happens is, I realise in myself, you get so triggered. The trauma of it. This high anxiety happens, along with a strong morning coffee, and you feel like: Whats going on here? She laughs again, but sounds more relaxed.

It was Arquette who, as the eldest sibling, launched the Alexis Arquette Family Foundation after Alexis died from an HIV-related heart attack in 2016. I felt really moved to do something, she says. Patricia contributed, got a couple of good donations. But the family appeared to disagree about which pronoun to use: Richmond chose he in his Facebook post, Patricia she.

This is whats so great about Alexis, Arquette says. Alexis was a they before the they pronoun existed. So which pronoun does the family use now? I go with what Alexis wanted and that was her choice, and her choice was it didnt matter, Arquette says. So we in our family say she. But at the end, Alexis, you know, had a beard. And I said, because Alexis was very ill, I said: Do you want to be buried in a beautiful, beautiful dress and be made up? Is that what you want? It doesnt matter, Ro. It doesnt matter. Male or female, Im just me. We got to have that conversation. So I know that Alexis would be they now, if she were alive.

Activism was always central to Arquette family life. Their mother, Brenda Denaut, was an activist. Alexis campaigned for trans rights. Patricia used her Oscars speech in 2015 to call for wage equality. Way back in 2002, Rosanna made a documentary, Searching for Debra Winger, about the shortage of film roles for older women. This is in our DNA, she says. I suspect even those words are part of the genetic makeup, because Patricia says exactly the same.

Arquette tries not to dwell on the kind of career she might have had. This is my karma. Its for the greater good that it happened to me, because what has become more important in my life is the activism, and being a voice for the voiceless. One of the voices for the voiceless, she amends. She is scrupulously modest.

The next step is the healing, she says. To this end, she is constantly working on her trauma in therapy, and talking with other women all the time, every day about their experiences. Dont these conversations require her to dwell in the moment of abuse?

Its not dwelling, she says. Its still really new. And we have to be diligent and on top of it at all times, because I think men think this is a phase women are going through, and were here to tell you, this is never going away. So many women have been abused, and its been normalised. We cant normalise this. Its not normal!

Still, I worry about the healing part. Arquette seems to feel all allegations of abuse personally. The day after the Brett Kavanaugh hearing, she woke up with shingles. Because the stress was so It was just too much when he got off!

And she finds it meaningful that Jeffrey Epstein died on her 60th birthday, as if their fates were entwined. Certainly, she spent her whole birthday dealing with a lot of women who were really affected by the fact that Jeffrey Epstein died. Thankfully, she had a total rocknroll love festival in her backyard later, attended by activists including Bamby Salcedo, Doctor Astrid Heger, Monica Ramirez and Joni Mitchell. Ellen Barkin was there in all her glory.

Patricia couldnt make it she was getting over the flu. But Arquettes daughter Zo gave a beautiful speech about how she appreciated me and I was always there for her, Arquette says. And Susanna Hoff from the Bangles played Eternal Flame and Walk Like An Egyptian and Take Me With U by Prince. Arquette is singing it now, quietly: I dont care pretty baby, take me with you

Still, the healing process cant have been helped by her recent tweet that she was sorry she was born white and privileged. Afterwards, she received so much abuse on social media that she contacted a really important person who does risk assessments on these sorts of threats. He wants her to be very careful about how I say things, she says, before launching into a clarification. Im defending what I said, and if it pisses people off Yes, just by the nature of the colour of my skin, I was born with privilege. And it is unfair. And thats what I meant to say … Why is it that I was born with privileges just because of the colour of my skin?

She is fighting on so many fronts. She flits from Weinstein to Epstein to Charles Manson to Kavanaugh, mostly in exclamatory bolts. Bearing in mind the threat specialists advice, I wonder if she ever considers …

Do I ever feel like I should shut the fuck up? she jumps in. I dont know how to not speak out. I think as a human being, its my job.

Untouchable: The Rise and Fall of Harvey Weinstein is on Sunday 1 September at 9pm on BBC Two

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