Kick Off Hispanic Heritage Month with An Education Twitter Chat:

Kick Off Hispanic Heritage Month with Education Twitter Chat:

ETHNIC STUDIES in Our Schools

by Melanie Mendez-Gonzales

In some school districts across the country, a debate on ethnic studies in high school is happening.

What is ethnic studies? It is the critical and interdisciplinary study of race, ethnicity, and indigeneity with a focus on the experiences and perspectives of people of color within and beyond the United States.

Advocates for ethnic studies believe that it will support academic success and bring an understanding between races. Opponents argue that ethnic studies are anti-American and teach divisiveness.

According to the National Education Agency, research finds that the overwhelming dominance of Euro-American perspectives leads many students to disengage from academic learning. In fact, a recent Stanford study shows the opposite effect that an ethnic studies course had on, particularly Hispanic male, students. Students in the study who took ethnic studies classes in a pilot program in San Francisco high schools increased attendance rates, improved their grades and even increased the number of earned course credits for graduation.

These courses allow students to connect to their own culture and see their home life inside their classrooms. That has a powerful impact. Some argue that ethnic studies could have a powerful impact on white students, too.

“Similar to students of color, white students have been miseducated about the roles of both whites and people of color throughout history,” Siobhan King Brooks, an assistant professor of African American studies at Cal State Fullerton said, and culturally relevant lessons allow white children to “not only learn about people of color, but also white people’s roles as oppressors and activists fighting for racial change. This is very important because often whites feel there is nothing [they] can do to change racism.” ()

Ethnic studies were born out of both educators’ and students’ desires to counterbalance inaccuracies and predominance of the Euro-American perspective found in U.S. schools’ curricula. However, the most recent rise of ethnic studies came out of the 2010 ban of a Mexican-American studies course in the Tucson United School District and the Arizona H.B. 2281. Mexican American studies has spread to high schools at a rate no one could have imagined before Arizona banned the class in 2010.*

Five California school districts, for example, has since made an ethnic-studies class a requirement, and 11 others offer it as an elective. Currently, California AB-2016, which would require the Instructional Quality Commission to develop, and for the state board to adopt, a model curriculum in ethnic studies for all districts to offer a course of study in ethnic studies, is sitting on Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk.

Albuquerque Public Schools will launch a new ethnic studies program for all 13 of its high schools beginning August 2017.

In Texas, there’s a different debate.

“The ban of Mexican American studies in Arizona opened our eyes to the discrimination,” Tony Diaz, El Librotraficante, says, “and how important it is to embrace our history and culture. We realized there was nothing to ban in Texas, so we needed to start one.”

Diaz and others began to demand that the Texas State Board of Education make Mexican-American studies a requirement in Texas schools. The result was an agreement from the SBOE to call for textbook proposals for the Mexican-American curricula that would be put in place in 2017 and until then, allow schools who wished to teach MexicanAmerican studies, to do so but without direction from the SBOE. Some Texas teachers have begun to implement Mexican-American studies in their classrooms.

The one textbook “Mexican American Heritage’ that was submitted for review has come under fire for what some have called ‘deeply flawed and a deeply offensive textbook’ that is filled with stereotypes. Protestors, including Diaz, will be in Austin, Texas to testify against the textbook at the SBOE hearing on Tuesday, September 13. A final vote on adoption is scheduled for November.

These are just some of the discussions happening today about ethnic studies courses in our schools.

Join our Twitter chat as we discuss more about ethnic studies in K – 12 education this Thursday, September 15. It is the beginning of Hispanic Heritage Month. Let’s have a real chat about what are Latino students are learning about their own heritage in schools.

LATISM Education Twitter Chat with Special Guest Tony Diaz

9 p.m. EST – 10 p.m. EST

TWITTER.COM/LATISM

Hashtags to follow: #LATISM #LATISMedu

Special Guest: @Librotraficante

Moderator: @LATISM

TonyDiazBio--element45Tony Diaz, El Librotraficante, founded Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say in 1998.He is the leader of the Librotraficantes-champions of Freedom of Speech, Intellectual Freedom, and Performance Protest. He holds a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, a black belt in Tae Kwon Do, and wrote the award winning novel THE AZTEC LOVE GOD. He also hosts the Nuestra Palabra Radio Program on 90.1 FM KPFT Houston, Texas.

He was recently named the Director of Intercultural Initiatives at Lone Star College-NH and will be starting their Mexican American Studies Program. Learn more about Tony Diaz at

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Sources:

*

https://ethnicstudies.berkeley.edu/

NEA, The Academic and Social Value of Ethnic Studies: A Research Review

https://news.stanford.edu/2016/01/12/ethnic-studies-benefits-011216/

https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/03/the-ongoing-battle-over-ethnic-studies/472422/

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Birth rate in PH down by 6 percent in 2018: PSA | ABS-CBN News

MANILA – About 190 babies were born per hour, or approximately 3 babies were born per minute in 2018, a decreased trend in the last 6 years, the Philippine Statistics Authority said.

PSA said there were a total of 1,668,120 live births registered in the country in 2018, or around 4,570 babies born daily. This is equivalent to a crude birth rate of 15.8 or 16 births per thousand of population.

The 2018 data showed a decreasing trend in the last 6 years, from 1,790,367 live births in 2012 to 1,668,120 live births in 2018. This accounts for a 6.8 percent drop in the number of registered live births since 2012.

PSA also showed more males were born than females. Of the total live births in 2018, 870,832 or 52.2 percent were male, while 797,288 or 47.8 percent were female. This resulted to a sex ratio at birth of 109 males per 100 females.

More than half of all live births in 2018 were in Luzon at 58.4 percent, followed by Mindanao at 23 percent and Visayas at 18.5 percent.

Among the regions, the National Capital Region recorded the highest number of birth occurrences at 14.3 percent, followed by Calabarzon at 13.8 percent and Central Luzon at 11.3 percent.

According to PSA, more babies were born outside the usual residence of the mother, which may be due to better health care facilities and services in the receiving region.

In 2018, most of the births occurred in September, with a total of 156,820 births or 9.4 percent of the total. This was followed by October at 9.3 percent, November at 8.9 percent and December at 8.8 percent.

The data also showed the least number of births in 2018 was in February, with only 113,912 births or 6.8 percent of the total live births.

Of the total number of births, 94.3 percent, or 9 out of 10 births, were attended by health professionals, either by a physician, a midwife or a nurse. 

Among all the regions in the Philippines, the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) showed a very low number of medically attended births, with almost half of the births in the region attended by traditional birth attendants, or hilot.

According to PSA, more than half, or 54.3 percent (906,106) of the total live births in 2018 were born out of wedlock. Calabarzon, NCR and Central Luzon recorded the highest number of babies born out of wedlock, while ARMM had the most number of legitimate births.

Majority of the babies were also born to mothers aged 20 to 24, and fathers aged 25 to 29. There were also more babies born to adolescent mothers (aged 19 below) than those sired by adolescent fathers.

The PSA have yet to release the full birth data for 2019, but it has recorded a total of 728,157 births from January to June of last year.

The PSA released the 2018 birth data on its official website on December 27, 2019.

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