Birth Tourism: Pregnant Nigerian Women To Be Denied United States Visa Under New Policy – Motherhood In-Style Magazine

The United States Government on Thursday gave visa officers more power to block pregnant women abroad including those from Nigeria from visiting America. Under a new rule, the US Department of State directed visa officers to stop “birth tourism” — trips designed to obtain citizenship for children of pregnant women to the country.

The President Donald Trump’s administration is using the new rule, which takes effect on Friday, to push consular officers abroad to reject women they believe are entering the United States specifically to gain citizenship for their child by giving birth.

The visas covered by the new rule are issued to those seeking to visit for pleasure, medical treatment or to see friends and family, a report by The New York Times, said.

Conservatives have long railed against what they call “anchor babies,” born on American soil and used by their parents to bring in other family members.

President Trump has also criticised the constitutional provision that grants citizenship to most babies born on American soil.

It is not clear whether such “birth tourism” is a significant phenomenon or that “anchor babies” do lead to substantial immigration, but many conservatives believe both issues are real and serious.

“Birth tourism poses risks to national security,”

Carl C. Risch, Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs at the State Department, wrote in the final rule.

“The birth tourism industry is also rife with criminal activity, including international criminal schemes.”

Consular officers were already unlikely to grant visa to women, who they believe were travelling to the United States solely to give birth. But with the new rule, the White House seems to be signalling to officers abroad that those close to delivering a child would be added to a growing list of immigrants unwelcome in the United States.

Nigeria is number three on birth tourism list in the United States after Russia and China. On Tuesday the US announced plans to impose fresh visa restrictions on countries including Nigeria.

Trump’s administration said the move was necessary to prevent potential acts of terrorism, as countries on the list don’t adequately vet their travelers to America.

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Kenyan Mum, Connie Muuru, Advises Women As She Marks 4 Years Since Her Daughter Was Battered To Death By Boyfriend – Motherhood In-Style Magazine

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Yesterday, January 14, marked the fourth anniversary of the death of a young Kenyan woman, Sharon Muuru who was killed by her boyfriend, Salim Kipruto Seem. The deceased’s mother, Mrs Connie Muuru, a Nairobi businesswoman took to Facebook to mourn and warn victims of domestic violence as she always does since the untimely loss of her daughter, who was a single mum.

Connie, who has started a project that would empower victims of domestic violence, says her daughter’s experience has made her cognizant of the morbid experiences people in violent relationships go through. She narrated that Salim made a habit of getting violent with the deceased even though he was jobless, lived in her daughter’s house and was fended for by Sharon.

The deceased was also not married to her killer and her only child was from a previous relationship according to Connie, who only got to know of how serious her child’s travails had been, only after the young mum had passed.

She narrated to eDaily what transpired until her daughter died.

”If someone shows you little elements of violence, walk out. Don?t wait to be beaten to death ? this applies to members of both genders.

Let the wrangling couple, whose relationship is marred by violence, to separate and solve their differences when not living under the same roof.

They can come back together later after their problems are solved amicably. For instance, my daughter knew her partner Serem was not a good person because she was beaten severally. She shouldn?t have waited until she was killed.

I am not against families, I am not against marriages. But when it comes to death, nothing can be compared.

My daughter thought since she was the one providing and paying the rent, then the man was the one to leave.

But that shouldn?t be the case. If you are the one providing and your partner becomes violent, please leave him or her. You can get another house and other properties, but not another life.”

Read Connie’s Facebook post from yesterday below:

Baby girl I wish there’s anything I can do to bring you back… It’s exactly 4 years today, since you left us.
January 14th will remain dark and sad day all my life!

It’s more painful to remember the man you cared and loved, decided to kill you.
Sadly you allowed him to continue staying in your house, even after many nights of violence.

You were kind… brilliant…considerate and selfless… maybe that’s why he took advantage of you.

But it’s doesn’t matter now though…I only hope that you made to heaven child

Continue resting with Angels, because you are one of them!

Your beautiful memories are with me daily and have consciously, refused to forget you.
IN MEMORY OF MY DAUGHTER SHARON MUURU, I CONTINUE SAYING NO TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE!

If your spouse can’t solve problems without a fight just part ways, while you are alive.Remember you have only one life… once you lose it, it’s forever!

MAY THE BEAUTIFUL SOUL OF MY DAUGHTER SHARON MUURU REST IN PEACE

See more photos:

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“I lost it all” – Nigerian Mum, Uche Osagie Speaks After Her Three Children’s Death In New Year’s Crash In Canada – Motherhood In-Style Magazine

The new year has started on a rather sour note for a Canada based Nigerian mum and she’s lamenting her woes. The distraught mum, Uche Osagie lost her three children in a car accident which occurred on New Year’s Day.

Narrating how the devastating and unimaginable loss occurred, Uche said her three children died in the collision which took place at northern Ontario highway while on her way to file an appeal for permanent status in Canada.

The Nigerian mother who fled Nigeria eight years ago with her two oldest children for a better life in Canada, said she was travelling to Toronto to get a lawyer to file a federal appeal after receiving a letter that her second appeal had been denied. The Osagies were, in fact, returning from that mission when their vehicle struck a rock-cut on New Year’s Day. The collision occurred close to the Highway 144 turnoff on Highway 17, just 20 kilometres shy of their home in Chelmsford, reports CBC.

The distraught mother said;

“I thought I was doing the best thing for them to bring them to Canada to give them a better life, but I don’t know anymore. 

“The celebration they longed for, they are no longer here to celebrate. So, to me, I think I’m a loser. I lost it all. All my fight, everything, is in vain and I ask myself, once again, and I keep asking God, ‘Why did you keep me?’ You should have taken me and let those children have a better future. It’s all about them. I lived all my life for those kids.”

“My son Destiny said ‘no, I’m not going back to Nigeria,’ ”

Osagie told CBC.

“‘I want to live in Canada. I would rather die than be deported.’”

Destiny, 11, was the eldest of the three children killed in the horrific crash. Brother Flourish, 10, and sister Britney, 6, also perished. Gerry Lougheed Jr. said the situation is among the saddest he has dealt with in nearly five decades as a Sudbury funeral director.

“For a whole family to be devastated like that is just unbelievable. When you have children at that age and so full of life – I’m sure they had friends at school and played games and all that fun stuff – and then in a matter of moments to have those three lives taken away, it’s terrible.”

He told the Star.

Flags flew at half-mast Monday outside Chelmsford Public School, where the Osagie children were pupils, and the Rainbow District School Board offices on Wembley Drive. Mental-health workers were on hand at the public school to provide support for classmates.

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How to pick friends in Nollywood – Ufuoma McDermott

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Nollywood actress, Ufuoma McDermott, is one damsel who has been able to sustain her relevance in Nollywood, despite the challenges of marriage and motherhood.

Although, there are speculations that Ufuoma’s friendship with her colleagues – Omoni Oboli, Uche Jombo and Chioma Akpotha had since packed, as it couldn’t stand the test of time, mother of two would not want to talk about that aspect of their lives.

However, going further, the actress revealed how to sustain friendship in Nollywood.
She said, ” I don’t think, I have ever sat back and drawn a plan, saying this person is going to be my friend. It just happens; your spirit just flows with certain kinds of people. You allow them into your inner circle. They look out for you, you look out for them. It is something that just happens, it is not planned.”

Explaining how she has been able to achieve a balance between being an actress, a wife and a mother, McDermott said, “I don’t there is something special because its entertainment. It’s the same way with doctors who have to go out for days and weeks. Even teachers can be transferred, diplomats who travel up and down. At the end of the day, balancing your family is dependent on you as a person, what you consider your priority and how you plan your life.”

Speaking further, the filmmaker added that she had never been under pressure to fit in as a public figure.

“It’s a case of to each their own; you will feel pressured if you want to be pressured. So I don’t feel any pressure. I am a working actor; I am not a social media actor. I act for real. Acting is my day job, so I am like the banker who gets up in the morning, goes to the bank, finishes from the bank and goes home. It’s the same for me. If I am on a movie set, I go do my job and I go home. I don’t feel any pressure as long as I don’t put it on myself,” she said.

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Female Victims Of Sex Trafficking Relieve Heart-rending Experiences Of Their Near-death Journey To Get Greener Pastures Overseas – Motherhood In-Style Magazine

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Every year, thousands of women and children become victims of sex trafficking in their own countries and abroad.

Nigeria is a source, transit, and destination country for women and children subjected to trafficking in persons including forced labor and forced prostitution.

Trafficked Nigerian women and children are recruited from rural areas within the country’s borders – women and girls for involuntary domestic servitude and sexual exploitation.

The quest to make it big in life coupled with the harsh living condition in the country forced these women to jump into the prospects of travelling abroad at any single opportunity not minding the consequences.

Many of these distraught and sometimes desperate Nigerians believe that the streets overseas are paved with gold, pounds and dollars that once you step into those countries it will be bye-bye to poverty and hardship.

Unfortunately, as it is said, not all that glitters is gold. To escape the hardship at home, many take great risks to travel abroad only to enter into a more harrowing experience.

Some die in the process while others escape with scars that may haunt them for the rest of their lives. While some were victims of circumstances, having been tricked and deceived into such journey, others take the risk of opting to travel abroad by land and sea routes knowing that they cannot afford the normal process of getting visas and honouring several embassy appointments. Some of the girls deceived into this route end up as sex slaves with so much regret and consequences.

reporter encountered two young women in Anambra, Amarachi Ojene, 23, and Tobechukwu Igboeri, who shared the chilling experiences of their near-death journey to get greener pastures overseas. Years after such ‘journey to hell’, their lives have never been the same again.

Amarachi, from Nibo, Awka South Local Government Area of Anambra State was an SS2 student in 2012 when she encountered a devil in human skin who not only took advantage of her naivety and innocence, but also exploited her poor parental background to trick her into a sex slavery trip abroad.

Having lost her dad when she was seven years, Amarachi relied on her mother who eked out a living by hawking cooked Okpa (a local delicacy) around the Awka metropolis. They also augmented the proceeds by engaging in manual labour in local farms for people at a fee.

So, she was so excited when she met her friends who told her that their aunt was looking for a house help that would live with her overseas. She reasoned that going abroad with the woman would ease a lot of load for her suffering mother as she would be paid in dollars, which she would send home to alleviate the family sufferings.

Hear Amarachi’s gory story:

“I vividly remember the day that two girls in my town, Chioma and Miracle, met me at the Eke Awka market, where I had gone to buy palm fruits for my mum’s Okpa business. They asked if I would like to travel abroad; they said their relation living in a foreign land was looking for a house-help to take along.

I was excited as I thought that a bright prospect for higher education and escape from poverty had come not knowing that I was walking into a death trap. They told me that the same relation was also taking them with her, so that they could be fixed into money-yielding ventures over there.

When I went home, I didn’t tell my mum immediately because I was afraid of her reaction, but when I eventually told her, she was also excited more so when she heard that the woman taking me abroad is from Awka. One week later, they came back and told me that we would leave in a few days.

They never told me the main thing we were going to do there and it was later that I realized that those girls were her agents who recruit unsuspecting ladies for her in the organized sex pimp business she does.

They took me to the woman called Aunty Ebube and I was surprised when I got there and saw many young girls there too. She asked me probing questions, wanting to know if I was aware of the business I had come to do and said no. We slept that night and the next morning she took us to a shrine at Umubelu Awka to take oath of allegiance and commitment.

The native doctor welcomed us saying that the expected guests had arrived. We were 19 girls in all and I was the youngest and the most immature among them, barely 16 years old then. Everything started happening in a jiffy as the man gave us white cloth to tie on our body.

The native doctor warned Ebube when we got there that I was going to spoil things for her, but I didn’t understand what was going on. I fainted there and they sprinkled water on me, but that didn’t deter them from administering the oath of secrecy.

Ebube said that we were going to pay her N450,000 each when we get to our destination and the native doctor warned us of the dire consequences of reneging in the deal as he told us that the deity of the shrine would strike any defaulter dead.

With a shaking body yet lacking the requisite courage to extricate myself from their grip, we got initiated there. We drank and chewed some substances there and were given a small calabash each. We danced round the shrine to complete the ritual.

The next day, we moved to Onitsha and boarded a luxury bus travelling to the North. She told us to tell any policeman we see on the road that we were going on holidays in the North to see our parents based there.  She told us never to accept that we were together in the journey and that if we implicate ourselves, she would not hesitate to disown us.”

Hijab for all of us

“When we reached the northern part of the country, she told us to change into hijab and pretend that we are northern Muslim girls. A vehicle, which she had pre-arranged, was already waiting for us by the time we arrived. We were squeezed into the vehicle.

She kept picking more people on the road, which showed that a syndicate was involved. We slept in Zendel and by 3:00a.m we left for another route until we got to a place they called Agadez. She told us to stay there for the meantime and find our destiny pending when those who will take us overseas arrive.”

‘Business’ begins

“When she told us that we should stay and test our destiny briefly, I never knew that it was a kick off for the prostitution business until I was handed over to some clients in a hotel. She forced us to wear skimpy dresses and singled me out having seen my demeanour.

She told me that I’m now in a no-man’s land and I should cooperate if I still wanted to remain alive. I was crying knowing that I had walked into a trap that would take divine intervention for me to wriggle out of it. I was deep in thought when she landed me a deafening slap.  She told me to be ready to die if I won’t allow men to sleep with me.

My first time was a man old enough to be my father. The man was given option to make a choice among the bevy of girls quartered there and he picked me knowing that I was a fresh virgin. I told him that it was over my dead body that he would sleep with me. I stubbornly refused to succumb to their threats.

Short time sex there goes for 5,000 CFAs while full time is 10,000 CFA. We kept on arguing and she told me that I should not join issues with her. I was made to know that our batch of girls was the fourth trip for her while the final destination is Libya.  Usually she would just sell the girls at Agadez and return to the Southeast to recruit more for the same purpose.”

How my Igbo dialect saved me

“On that fateful night, two men came to look for female companions. She spoke with them in the local language, which I did not understand. As I was about to be handed over to them, I exclaimed in Igbo language, ‘Ewooh, o kam si jee (Is this how I have ended up)?’  When the supposed sex customers heard my exclamation, they became more interested in taking me to their home at all costs that night. They offered Madam Ebube 15,000CFA and took me.

On our way, they started asking me probing questions and I opened up and told them my predicament and identity. They were shocked and also told me they were from Enugu State. Instead of taking advantage of me that night, they treated me like a sister.

One of the boys, Anayo, told me that perhaps God made them come to the brothel that night for my sake because they had already retired after the day’s business, but on a second thought decided to stroll to a happening joint.

The two boys kept me safe, took pity on me, refused to sleep with me and offered me a mattress where I slept in the sitting room and they retired to the bedroom. They took me back to the hotel the next morning and Madam asked me whether I enjoyed my night with those boys and I said yes.

I told her that I want to go home and she started another round of threats. She told me that I could go if I repay her N450, 000. She sold one girl there and told me that I would be the next; she also reminded us that the oath we took spelt out death or madness on anyone who attempted to leave the place secretly.”

At the crossroads

“At this point, my heart was pounding and I excused her and ran back in the direction to Anayo’s house, but he was not in. I wrote a notice on their gate telling him that if he doesn’t come to rescue me immediately, I would be either dead or sold off into slavery the next day.

As God would have it, I was apprehensive that night knowing that time was ticking away for me when suddenly Anayo showed up and told our madam that he needs me for another night again. Madam thought I treated him well and handed me to him, but he took me to the house of one of the villagers and hid me there.

I was hidden for three days and madam had to suspend her trip and kept searching for me. Anayo gave me a phone and was relating all that was happening to me until the fourth day that he took me to the park. If not that he hid me, I would have died in the desert en route Libya.

Of all the 19 girls, I was the only one who returned home. I have not set eyes again on Ifunanya, who she sold first. (Begins to sob). I don’t know their fate till today. Whether they eventually reached Libya, died of hunger or were devoured by wild beasts.

“Anayo and his brother bought a ticket for me, took me by 3:00 a.m from Zendel and landed in Kano.  I boarded a vehicle to Abuja, but I didn’t know anybody there.”

Ran into kidnapper’s vehicle

“In Abuja, I entered a cab that promised to take me to Kuje where some of our brothers resided, but I never knew I had boarded the wrong vehicle. The man took me on a wrong route and headed towards a thick bush. I raised the alarm, but nobody could answer me.

The man showed me his undies and I saw all manner of weapons, guns, knife and other things he had on him. He told me to say my last prayer because he would kill me and take my body parts. He used the short knife to slash my clothes to pieces and I was stark naked.

He raped me and wanted to take my body parts fresh and I ran and he gave me a hot chase. I saw a vehicle laden with tomatoes and lay flat for the vehicle to crush me. The driver stopped abruptly, picked me naked like that and I passed out. When I regained consciousness, I saw myself in the military barracks, Abuja.”

She never knew I was still alive

Under the custody of the military, Amarachi was taken to the scene where she boarded the evil man’s cab, but the man could not be traced. The army later handed her to NAPTIP who documented her case and made efforts to rehabilitate her and also seek ways of punishing her trafficker.  She was later sent home in Anambra where she reunited with her family. She later saw her trafficker and got her arrested.

“The day I saw her at Eke Awka, she was shocked because she thought I was dead. Because we reported to DSS and NAPTIP when I came home, they gave me a number to call them any day I sight her and that was what I did. When I called the phone line, she was picked up. They raided her home, detained her and the native doctor (he is dead now) and were also charged to court.”

Picking up the pieces of her life

Settling down to a normal life after the harrowing experience for Amarachi has not been easy. Though she managed to go back to school and finally wrote her senior school certificate exams, Amarachi’s problems are far from being over. Her mother suddenly collapsed and died from high blood pressure leaving her and the siblings as orphans.

She also fell in love with a man who is not financially buoyant. The uncle who now acts as her father insisted that all the traditional rites of marriage would be completed before she is pronounced married. Along the line, she got pregnant for the fiancé and had to give birth in her home. Now nursing a 10-month-old baby boy, life has remained tough and harsh for her.

“My uncle refused to allow the man take me home because he couldn’t fulfill the long list of requirements presented to him. My mother died heartbroken for all these shocks and now without both parents, we find it even difficult to feed,” she lamented.

Appeal and words of advice

“I still thank God I’m alive today.  My advice is that people should not allow anybody deceiving them with fairy tale promises about travelling abroad.  I need urgent help presently. Helpless without mum or dad and also nursing a baby, I desire to go back to school and upgrade my life, but now even to feed is a serious problem. Government and public-spirited individuals should help me,” she pleaded.

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Facebook Owner & Dad-of-Two, Mark Zuckerberg Shares Why He Regulates Screen Exposure For His Daughters – Motherhood In-Style Magazine

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Facebook’s founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg has shared his etiquette for screen time exposure for his daughters with wife Priscilla Chan — August, 2, and Maxima, 3. According to the billionaire dad, he generally dislikes that his children be sitting in front of a computer or television for a long period of time and so, he’s come up with a regulation that allows them to minimally use Facebook’s video chat product, Portal.

Zuckerberg says it is healthier because it is a video portal that allows the kids keep in touch with their grannies and aunts, and that they have to engage with the humans while using the screen, it is much healthier and comes with the benefits of feeling real connection.

“I don’t generally want my kids to be sitting in front of a TV or a computer for a long period of time,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said on Fox News’

The Daily Briefing, posted Friday.

“I let my kids use that to communicate with my parents, so they can stay in touch with their grandparents easily, [and] their aunts who live across the country,”

Zuckerberg said.

According to Zuckerberg, that kind of screen time — using video to interact with other human beings — is actually good for you, with benefits such as feeling more connected and healthier.

“I think all the research would generally support that,”

Zuckerberg Told “The Daily Briefing.”

However, says Zuckerberg, passively consuming content, or “going from video to video” isn’t associated with the same positive effects.

While that may be the standard thinking (the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that kids ages 2 to 5 only use screens for one hour a day, and kids 18 to 24 months only use digital media to video chat) a new study from the Oxford Internet Institute at Oxford University found that moderate screen use is actually beneficial for kids’ development.

After analyzing data from 35,000 American children ages 6 months to 17 years (and their caregivers), researchers found that the sweet spot seems to be about one to two hours of screen time a day. “Screen time” includes using digital devices such as iPads and watching television.

The kids who were exposed to the optimal amount of screen time had better levels of social and emotional well-being than kids who weren’t allowed to use digital devices. (In this study, researchers controlled the data for variables that influence digital engagement, such as age and sex, race and ethnicity, stress, social support and health.)

So banning kids from using technology altogether, or implementing age restrictions, isn’t the best solution for parents who are concerned about their children’s screen use,

“particularly as screen usage in some cases has a net positive impact,”

Andrew Przybylski, Director of Research at the Oxford Internet Institute and study author said in a press release.

There is an upper limit for screen time, though: This study also found that kids could watch four hours of TV or use an electronic device for five hours before it started to affect their behavior. Compared to the average amount of time that kids use devices (about two hours of tablets and smartphones, and one hour and 45 minutes of TV), these numbers are very high.

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Yinka Ayefele Opens Up On The Birth Of His Miracle Triplets & Why He Kept The News From The Public – Motherhood In-Style Magazine

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Nigerian veteran music star, Yinka Ayefele has opened up on the birth of his babies and why he kept the news of the birth of the triplets Richard, Eniola and Raymond, from the public.

According to the Juju singer, he feared for the lives of his new triplets – two boys and a girl – who were prematurely born on January 18.

In June, the news of the birth of the miracle triplets was broken by some trigger happy media platforms but the singer vehemently denied it, saying it wasn’t true. In a new interview with , Ayefele said he denied the reports because they were on intensive care. He shared:

”Yes, I even denied it once when it happened. When the news broke a lot of people were talking about it because my babies were very tiny because they were born prematurely’.

So, I was afraid to broadcast. I did not want to lose them after the long wait and according to a Yoruba adage that says if you broadcast a child you might lose the child, so, I decided to keep it within the family until they are fully grown and healthy.

That is why I denied it when the news got out. But my partner told me not to be afraid, that God, who gave the kids will surely protect them and that was when I came out to tell people. I was initially afraid of how they looked, very tiny, thank God today they are big.

It was hard to keep it a secret. A lot of colleagues in the media knew about it but I told them to hold on till the right time to broadcast it. I tried as much as I could to keep the news from getting out, I did not release any of their pictures.”

For over 20 years, the famous Tungba exponent battled a fertility challenge following a ghastly accident that has since confined him into a wheel chair after a spinal cord injury. With the belief by many that it cannot happen again, Ayefele never wavered as he believed in the spiritual power of God as well as modern science.

Speaking further, the dad-of-three confirmed that the triplets; two boys and a girl were born on January 18, 2019 at Holy Cross Hospital in the USA. He also explained how it felt like, from the moment his wife was confirmed pregnant till the time the babies arrived. In his words:

“It was stage by stage. Are you asking me when we first went for the pregnancy test or when the pregnancy was a month, 3 months, 6 months or 9 months, or during labour or the day my wife gave birth? I can’t explain it each month from the 8th day she was confirmed pregnant. I most ran mad when I heard she was pregnant.

I could not believe it after series of attempts. I didn’t know who to explained it to, but the night she gave birth it was as if I have seen them together before because I have followed her to many scan sessions. It was like welcoming them fully that night. I can’t really tell how I felt that night.”

In addition, he said he could not believe his eyes when his wife got pregnant and was full of gratitude to God when the triplets were born as many had thought he could never have a child after 22 years of marriage.

“I don’t mind having triplets, even if I can go as far as having 20, I really don’t mind because the pain of looking for a child was so aggravating. It wasn’t easy going to mountains for prayers, going to different hospitals, both at home and abroad, doing one test to the other.

Yinka Ayefele is on a wheelchair, people think I can’t get a woman pregnant because of my situation, because of my spinal cord issue. Eventually, God blessed me with triplets.”

The 51-year-old also said that his triplets tend to eat, cry, and defecate at the same time, adding that the most difficult part of it all is having to carry all of them at a time.

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