Louisville Film Society to host annual Oscar Watch Party

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‘And the winner is …’ It’s time to start making your Oscar night plans, Louisville


Kirby Adams


Louisville Courier Journal
Published 10:48 AM EST Jan 7, 2020

The 77th Golden Globes on Sunday night kicked off the 2020 season of entertainment awards shows. Now, with that glittery and booze-soaked celebration fading in the rearview mirror, it’s time to look forward to February to the opulence of the 92nd Academy Awards. 

Who will win the golden Oscar for Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Picture and Director? Find out the answer to these Academy Awards night nail-biters in the company of friends, new and old, at the seventh annual Oscar Watch Party presented by Louisville Film Society Feb. 9.

With a little over one month to go before the famous words “and the winner is” are heard around the world, the Louisville Film Society is hosting its own award-worthy Oscar Watch Party at Rabbit Hole Distillery in NuLu at 711 E. Jefferson St.

Guests are invited dress to dazzle and walk the red carpet starting at 7 p.m. then join the fun and festivities. Christine Fellingham (Louisville Magazine) and I will again serve as Masters of Ceremony and will welcome guests on the red carpet before the live broadcast begins at 8 p.m. Multiple large-screen TVs will be placed throughout Rabbit Hole to view the awards streaming live from the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood.

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And even though this is a party, don’t worry if you’re a “serious” Oscar viewer. There will be a special designated area for serious Oscar watchers set in the active distillery.

Throughout the broadcast, you’ll enjoy heavy hors d’oeuvres, desserts and a full open bar, including custom cocktails designed by Rabbit Hole, all served in an ambiance reflecting the glamour of Hollywood’s biggest night. 

Be sure to bring extra cash to test your skill at predicting the winners in a $250 ballot competition. Plus, there will be raffles and a silent auction with film-related items and more.

Tickets to Louisville Film Society’s Oscar Watch Party are $100, which includes a one-year $50 Louisville Film Society membership. They may be purchased at louisvillefilmsociety.org.

The Louisville Film Society is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing resources and support to local filmmakers as well as enriching the Louisville community through exposure to engaging and innovative films and cinematic programming. The Oscar Watch Party is the organization’s primary membership drive and fundraiser helping to support the organization’s programming and operations throughout the year.

For more information, contact Nancy Tafel at nancy@louisvillefilmsociety.org or 502-593-1243.

Oscars 2020: Here are the films and actors leading the race

 Reach Kirby Adams at kadams@courier-journal.com or Twitter @kirbylouisville. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today: courier-journal.com/kirbya.

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Maryam Sanda to Appeal Death Sentence

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•Justice was served, says co-convener of BBOG

Alex Enumah and Udora Orizu in Abuja

Mrs. Maryam Sanda, who was on Monday sentenced to death by hanging for killing her husband, will appeal the judgment, a member of his legal team has told THISDAY.
Justice Yusuf Halilu of the High Court of the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) had given her the maximum sentence for killing her husband, Mr. Bilyaminu Bello.

However, some women and civil rights activists have condemned the death penalty, describing it as unacceptable.
But another activist and co-convener of #BringBackOurGirls (BBOG) movement, Mrs. Aisha Yesufu, welcomed the death penalty, saying that it was not only an adequate punishment but also that justice had been served in the case.

The federal government had arraigned her on a two-count charge bordering on murder.
In the judgment delivered, the trial judge held that there was circumstantial evidence coupled with the defendant’s testimony and statement to the police that she “fatally” stabbed her husband to death in Abuja on November 19, 2017.
The judge while stating that the offence for which the defendant was convicted was based on Section 221 of the Penal Code imposed the maximum sentence.

“It has been said that thou shall not kill. Whoever kills in cold blood shall die in cold blood,” the judge said, adding: “Maryam Sanda should reap what she has sown. It is blood for blood.”
However, reacting to the judgment yesterday, one of the lawyers, who spoke off the record, said they would go on appeal against the judgment.

“She has a constitutional right of appeal and definitely she has to exercise it,” he said, adding: “We will definitely appeal the judgment.”
Sanda killed her husband on November 19, 2017, through multiple stabbing.
She was arraigned alongside three other persons, including her mother and brother.
However, the others were discharged because the prosecution was unable to link them to the charges.
The late Bello is a son of a former national chairman of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), Alhaji Haliru Bello.

Activists Condemn Death Penalty

Some women and civil rights activists have condemned the death penalty given to Sanda, describing it as unacceptable.
In a WhatsApp conversation with THISDAY, an activist and Director of Women Advocates Research and Documentation Centre, Mrs. Abiola Akiyode-Afolabi, condemned the court’s ruling.

Though she agreed that anyone found guilty of such conduct should be punished, she said death penalty was condemnable.
She said: “It’s a very unfortunate situation, killing of a spouse whether a man or woman is condemnable and anyone found guilty of such conduct should be punished, as deterrence.

The society should have zero tolerance to gender-based violence. “However, death penalty is condemnable. I think maximum sentence in this instance is not the option given the background of the offence. The society should shift from the culture of death penalty; it is no longer acceptable, it has not served the purpose it was meant in the society.”

Corroborating Akiyode-Afolabi’s comment, human rights lawyer and Director of Citizens Advocacy for Social and Economic Rights (CASER), Mr. Frank Tietie, said Sanda should not have been given the maximum punishment.

Tietie in a phone conversation with THISDAY hinged his claim on the possibility of defendant being mentally unstable during the time the crime was committed and the defence team not doing enough to explore all the possible defences available to the woman.
He added that Nigeria must move beyond being a retentionist country in these modern times and realise that death penalty does not solve problems.

According to him, “Mental incapacity is something that should have been brought to the court and with the use of expert witness to prove that she’s not mentally capable of organising herself in such a state of frustration.

“Firstly, for someone to want to kill her husband is an expression of abnormality; it’s not quite natural. I suspect that her mental health was something to be questioned, which should have been brought before the court. If to argue that the woman did not do it, it’s a different thing but to say that she did it, her mind set was not in control of her mental faculty as at the time she did it because of the marital trauma she must have been exposed to which was prolonged and eventually led to pent-up anger and she was also left unattended to by relatives and friends.”

He expressed optimism that Sanda has a window for appeal both at the Court of Appeal and Supreme Court.
He said: “It’s my hope that some new pieces of evidence will be introduced.

“Even by law, death penalty is barbaric; Oscar Pistorius wasn’t given maximum sentence not to talk about this kind of culpable homicide that was done based on crime of passion. What led her to committing those crimes should have been brought to the court.”
But activist and co-convener of #BringBackOurGirls, Yesufu, believed that justice was served.

She, however, tasked the judiciary to also apply the same energy in ensuring that everyone gets justice regardless of one’s status or gender.

She said: “For me basically the case is simple. Maryam Sanda was found guilty of killing her husband and of course justice has been served. My take out from this is that if the Nigerian judiciary system can be very strict in ensuring that people get justice, a lot of things that happen in Nigeria, we wouldn’t see them happening.

“People won’t have any reason to take the laws into their hands and feel that they can do anything and get away with it. No matter who you are, you have to pay for your crimes no matter your gender, age or status. It’s all a tragic ending for the families involved but it’s what it is, justice has been served.”

The post Maryam Sanda to Appeal Death Sentence appeared first on THISDAYLIVE.

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Slaves, nannies, and maids: Oscars value women of colour – in subservient roles | Film | The Guardian

For Oscar voters, what makes a great performance has disturbingly narrow criteria for non-white performers. The observation that people of colour are only ever recognised for playing slaves and criminals, that their stories are only ever seen as important when they deal with tragedy and suffering, does not strictly belong to the unenlightened past. This week’s Oscar nominations prove that such judgments are planted firmly in the present.

The kinds of roles being written for people of colour over the past decade have begun to expand to encompass a wider range of experiences. Just recently we were graced with the luminous Jennifer Lopez as savvy stripper Ramona in Hustlers; newcomer Nora Lum (Awkwafina) as the conflicted granddaughter of a dying matriarch in The Farewell; Lupita Nyong’o in a remarkable two-in-one turn in Jordan Peele’s Us. This all goes without mentioning the incredible performances that never quite picked up steam: Alfre Woodard in Clemency, for instance, or Song Kang-Ho in Parasite. But never mind the fertile pickings. This year the Academy has nominated one person of colour – Cynthia Erivo as Harriet Tubman in Harriet. This outcome is dismaying, partly because it falls neatly into a familiar pattern: a person of colour performing a racially specific form of suffering, the outlier in a sea of white nominees.

Erivo’s nomination for Harriet, a film that received middling reviews, is not a preposterous decision. Actors are often recognised for individual work that might stand out in an otherwise mediocre film (take Renée Zellweger in Judy). I’m not bothered by the quality of Erivo’s performance. There are far more egregious entries on that front, with the likes of Charlize Theron for Bombshell, or Scarlet Johansson for Jojo Rabbit, reaping nods (have the Oscars ever been a legitimate meritocracy?). Far more worrisome is what Erivo’s nomination suggests about the way Academy voters evaluate performers of colour, who seem to be the most visible, and taken the most seriously, within the trappings of white pity.

That voters overlooked a performance like Nyong’o’s in Us, a chilling interpretation of two sides of the same self, is telling. It doesn’t matter that this performance matches, if not surpasses entirely that of Joaquin Phoenix’s in Joker, even though both actors play, with tremendous physical commitment, psychologically tormented characters in genre films. Instead, the Academy prefers the Nyong’o who starred in 12 Years a Slave (2013), a film in which she is a slave, raped and humiliated. For these efforts, so difficult for the conscience to ignore, she was awarded best supporting actress.

In the last decade, only 14 women of colour were among the 100 women nominated by the Academy for the best actress and best supporting actress awards. There were even fewer men of colour (nine out of 100). That the same types of roles – slaves, nannies, and maids – continue to be the magic ticket to the red carpet, feels particularly ugly considering the range of parts played by white nominees. This year, for instance, the characters of Erivo’s fellow best actress nominees include a Fox newswoman, an icon of classic Hollywood, an aspiring young writer, and a hopeful divorcee. In 2019, Yalitza Aparicio was nominated for her performance in Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma. Aparicio is one of the few Latin American actresses to receive the honour, joining Adriana Barraza as a deported nanny in Babel, and Catalina Sandino Moreno as a drug mule in Maria Full of Grace.




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As moving as these performances are, these films leave a bitter taste as they reaffirm tired conceptions of Latin American women. Aparicio plays a housemaid silently enduring racism and neglect, which recalls another Academy favourite – Tate Taylor’s The Help (2011), which stars Octavia Spencer and Viola Davis as resilient maids, as well! Such slim parameters betray the desire, perhaps even the need by Oscar voters, for a particularly cheap form of pathos, one that simplifies and minimises the experiences of non-white people by placing them on the margins or in the past. Those performances that don’t square with this mould are often considered too “light,” too niche, or too subversive for the Academy, all of which indicates the incredible myopia of its voting body and the thinly veiled racism that guides it.

Perhaps hoping for a consistently diverse pool of Oscar nominees is blind optimism; the more time passes, the anomalous triumphs of films such as Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight, feel like a fever dream. By opening up its membership to more women and people of colour, and enlisting diverse talent such as John Cho, Issa Rae, and Tiffany Haddish to present its nominations, the Academy has attempted to create an image of inclusivity. But given this year’s batch of nominees, that commitment has proven to be both superficial and a bad joke.

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Pressure mounts on Roman Polanski over new sexual assault allegation | Film | The Guardian

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Oscar-winning director Roman Polanski has threatened legal action over claims by a former actor that he raped her in the 1970s.

The 86-year-old film-maker denied the allegation, but pressure is mounting on Polanski, who fled to France in 1978 after admitting to the statutory rape of a 13-year-old girl in Los Angeles.

Jean Dujardin, the star of Polanski’s latest film, which comes out in France on Wednesday, abruptly cancelled a prime-time interview on the TF1 television station, which was set for Sunday.

And the French artists’ guild ARP could meet soon to discuss his exclusion, its vice president told the Parisien newspaper.

An ARP spokesman later told Agence France-Presse (AFP) that although no board meeting had yet been organised, “if we are going to decide on Roman Polanski’s membership, we will do so with the approval of film-makers”.

Valentine Monnier, a photographer and former actress, has accused Polanski, who is French-Polish, of an “extremely violent” assault and rape at his chalet in the Swiss ski resort of Gstaad in 1975, when she was 18.

Monnier claimed he tried to make her swallow a pill during the attack, and later made a tearful apology while demanding a promise that she never tell anyone.

“I thought I was going to die,” she said in an open letter published by Le Parisien, which also interviewed her.

“Mr Polanski disputes in the strongest terms this rape accusation,” his lawyer Hervé Temime told AFP in a statement.

“We are working on the legal action to bring against this publication,” he added.

Polanski and his new film, An Officer and a Spy, had already courted controversy in September when it was included in the Venice film festival, where it won the grand jury prize.

Monnier, who acted in films in the 1980s, said the release of the film, about one of the most notorious errors of justice in French history, the Dreyfus affair, had prompted her to speak out.

“How could he benefit from public funds to instrumentalise history, and in doing so rewrite his own to cover up his criminal past?” she wrote, referring to French subsidies for film productions.

“He pummelled me until I gave in and then raped me, making me do all sorts of things,” she added.

She had previously written to France’s first lady Brigitte Macron, who forwarded two letters to France’s equality minister Marlène Schiappa, who has pushed for new measures to combat sexual abuse.

Schiappa wrote to Monnier in March last year and hailed her courage “in daring to break the silence”, but stressed that the allegations had to be dealt with by the judicial system.

But her account may prove a turning point for French cinema, where the #MeToo movement that roiled Hollywood has not prompted as deep a reckoning of alleged abuses in the industry.

Monnier is the first Frenchwoman to accuse Polanski of rape. Since he was arrested in California in 1977 on charges of drugging and raping Samantha Gailey, now known as Samantha Geimer, five other women including Monnier have come forward to allege that he either raped or sexually assaulted them.

Polanski has denied all of the claims, but in 2017 he left his post as president of the Cèsars, the French equivalent of the Oscars, and the following year he was expelled from the US Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Alain Terzian, president of France’s APC film promotion association, which oversees the Cèsars, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Both France and Poland have refused to extradite Polanski to the US, where California prosecutors are pressing their case even after Polanski paid Geimer $225,000 in an out-of-court settlement in 1994.

On Twitter, Geimer criticised Monnier for not speaking sooner, writing on Saturday:

“Taking heat for not being more supportive of accusers who use film release dates to schedule their revelations with the press & sat silently while I was called a liar & a gold digging whore in 1977 knowing they may have prevented it, if they had the truth & my mom’s courage.”

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Film producer blame filmakers for “Lionheart” disqualification at the Oscars

Agency Reporter

The entire Nollywood is to be blamed for the disqualification of Nigeria’s Oscar choice “Lionheart’’, a movie producer, Chima Okereke, said on Wednesday

“Lionheart”, directed by Genevieve Nnaji, was Nigeria’s first-ever Oscar submission for best international feature film.

It was disqualified on Monday by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for not having “a predominantly non-English dialogue track”.

Films for the must have a predominantly non-English dialogue track but the 95-minute Lion Heart is largely in English, with an 11-minute section in the Igbo Language.

Okereke, the Managing Director of the Fresh Talent Production, a movie company, told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) that the structure was flawed.

“In the opinion of the screeners, the film should have used majorly the Igbo Language than the English Language, and the blame game started flying.

“It is important to understand that profit considerations cannot allow a big film of that status, shot in Nigeria, to be shot majorly in Igbo or any other Nigerian Language.

“It will most likely lead to loss of capital investment; people might not want to watch because it was done in a local language; sentiments, politics and ethnic nuances will kill its potential patronage no matter how great the film is in terms of theme, interpretation, value and impact,’’ he said.

He saidd that the committee that nominated “Lionheart’’ did not want an opportunity to slip by.

“The gamble did not fly; now, we should learn from it.

“At least, thousands of filmmakers who lampooned some of us for not aiming for Oscar will now see the reason.

“King of Boys’’, “Trip to Jamaica’’, “Wedding Party’’ and others that made huge profits as we gathered, would not have made it to Oscar because they were not shot in Yoruba or Igbo language and then
subtitled in English,’’ he said.

He noted that some years back at a seminar organised Directors Guild of Nigeria, the issue of nomination for Oscar came up.

“I told everyone who nursed that idea to do that in indigenous language. You see it now.

“Only one category is reserved for films made outside Hollywood, and to be qualified to win Oscar, the language must be indigenous.

“It could be Spanish, Portuguese, Igbo, Efik, Mandarin, Yoruba, etc., targeting at least 60-65 per cent indigenous language.’’ he said.

READ ALSO: Genevieve Nnaji’s ‘Lionheart’ is Nigeria’s submission for the Oscar

Okere said that filmmakers working toward entrance for Oscar would have no choice than to use non-English language.

Use your local language; shooting a film with American or British Language will not get you a nomination,’’ he said.

Okereke, however, said that a film shot in English Language could make it to Oscar if co-produced with a Hollywood producer.

“The lesson from “Lionheart’’ disqualification is: Take your language serious; follow the rules. Hollywood takes film production as a serious business and protects it with its award system.

“There has to be collaborative efforts from filmmakers in Nigeria by putting the elements needed to win at the big stage – from story to language options and to value and marketing.

“Filmmakers have to go back to the drawing board and get it right.

“If we neglect this facts, we miss billions in not keying into global film business,’’ he said.

(NAN)

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Fact check: Trump tells elaborate false story about Van Jones apologizing to him

 

Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump criticized CNN host Van Jones at length on Friday during a speech to the Young Black Leadership Summit, a conservative event at the White House.

“The only one he didn’t mention was me,” Trump said.
“I kept waiting for my name,” Trump continued. “I said, ‘Darling, come over here. I’m going to have a great little name mention. Yes, darling’ — First Lady. How good is the First Lady? So she came over. And I kept waiting. And I kept waiting. And then he named a lot of people — that was the end. I said — I was a little embarrassed in front of my wife. I said, ‘He didn’t name me! I’m the one that did it!’ I called up Jared (Kushner), right Jared? I said, ‘What the hell is this?’ “
Trump complained that Jones had called for his defeat in the election on the same show. And he then claimed that Jones later apologized for omitting him.
“And then he spoke to Jared and he apologized, didn’t he? He apologized. But I don’t accept those apologies,” Trump said.
Facts First: Jones said Friday that he has never made any such apology to Trump or Kushner. He has never praised Sharpton on his CNN show, and he has habitually given Trump credit for the First Step Act — including in a CNN appearance three weeks ago, in which he said, “I think Trump has gotten too little credit for what he did on criminal justice reform.”
Jones said Friday: “I literally do not know what he’s talking about.”
“I have not apologized for not mentioning Trump because I’ve never not mentioned Trump,” he said. “Why would I apologize for not doing something that I did?”
Jones said he thinks Trump might have been confusing him with entertainer and activist John Legend.
Legend, a vocal Trump critic, participated in a town hall event on criminal justice that aired on MSNBC in September. According to The Washington Post, Trump’s role in signing the First Step Act was not explicitly mentioned on the show.
The night the MSNBC show aired, Trump lashed out at Legend on Twitter while complaining that he and Republicans were not being given enough credit for the First Step Act. He mentioned Jones in the same Twitter thread, though Jones did not appear on the show.
“….A man named @VanJones68, and many others, were profusely grateful (at that time!). I SIGNED IT INTO LAW, no one else did, & Republicans deserve much credit. But now that it is passed, people that had virtually nothing to do with it are taking the praise. Guys like boring musician @johnlegend, and his filthy mouthed wife, are talking now about how great it is – but I didn’t see them around when we needed help getting it passed,” Trump said.
Legend, winner of the Grammy, Oscar, Emmy and Tony awards, responded by tweeting: “Imagine being president of a whole country and spending your Sunday night hate-watching MSNBC hoping somebody—ANYBODY—will praise you. Melania, please praise this man. He needs you.”
Legend’s wife Chrissy Teigen, the model, television host, author and popular online personality whom Trump disparaged as “filthy mouthed,” responded with a profane insult that went viral on Twitter. She added, “The absolute best part of his tweet is I literally didn’t speak in the special, nor was I mentioned.”
The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Conservative media outlets have taken note of Jones’ repeated praise of Trump over the law, words for which Jones has received criticism from some liberals. In May, for example, the right-wing Daily Caller quoted Jones saying, “We’ve got to give Trump credit where credit is due. He did fight hard to pass the bill and he made it possible for other Republicans to also be in the pro-criminal justice camp.”
Jones thanked Sharpton for his support and guidance in a 2018 appearance he made on Sharpton’s radio show to discuss the First Step Act. But that radio show bore no resemblance to the story Trump told about a recent television show.
Jones briefly mentioned criminal justice reform on his CNN show in August, and called for Trump’s defeat on that program, but the program also was not at all similar to the one Trump described; Jones did not mention Sharpton or recite a long list of people responsible for the First Step Act.

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Hollywood remembers Diahann Carroll

Algorithmia AI Generated Summary

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(CNN)Diahann Carroll was in her lifetime many things: a singular talent, a trailblazer, a breaker of barriers.

Ava DuVernay

“Diahann Carroll walked this earth for 84 years and broke ground with every footstep. com/ava/status/1180159835989348352?s=20″ target=”_blank”>Twitter

    Holly Robinson Peete

    “This one cuts deeply.


    Golden Globe award

    (CNN)Diahann Carroll was in her lifetime many things: a singular talent, a trailblazer, a breaker of barriers.

    Ava DuVernay

    “Diahann Carroll walked this earth for 84 years and broke ground with every footstep. An icon. One of the all-time greats. She blazed trails through dense forests and elegantly left diamonds along the path for the rest of us to follow. Extraordinary life. Thank you, Ms. Carroll.” — via Twitter

      Holly Robinson Peete

      “This one cuts deeply. My mom & Ms Diahann were friends since they were 14. She was a pioneer on so many levels. She made me believe I could be on television! I loved & cherished and idolized her like a daughter…RIP Diahann Carroll thank you for the gift of your life.” — via Twitter

      Debbie Allen

      “Diahann Carroll you taught us so much. We are stronger, more beautiful and risk takers because of you. We will forever sing your praises and speak your name. Love Love Love, Debbie.” — via Twitter

      Rev. Jesse Jackson

      “#DiahannCarroll was a transformative force for freedom. She identified with Dr King in the civil rights movement with a simple kiss. She brought down ancient barriers & built bridges. She left the world better than she found it. We are in her debt. We miss her so much already. RIP” – via Twitter

      Barbra Streisand

      “RIP Diahann Carroll. You gave a lot to this world. Thank you, Love Barbra” — via Twitter

      Billy Dee Williams

      “My dear, dear beautiful #DiahannCarroll passed away today . What a pioneer she was in the business….what an incredibly kind soul. We met in High School and continued our friendship for many, many years.
      The memories and the tears are flowing.” — via Twitter

      Matt Bomer

      “One of the great joys of my career was getting to work with, laugh with, sing with, and listen to Miss Diahann Carroll for 6 years on White Collar. We are all deeply saddened by her loss, and will miss her greatly. I love you Diahann, and I will never forget your wisdom, generosity of spirit, and the ever present twinkle in you eye. You broke so many boundaries, and you helped me to have the courage to push through my own. Thank you for the memories, and Rest In Peace. What a life you lived. Our hearts and thoughts are with her family today. #diahanncarroll” — via Instagram
      View this post on Instagram

      One of the great joys of my career was getting to work with, laugh with, sing with, and listen to Miss Diahann Carroll for 6 years on White Collar. We are all deeply saddened by her loss, and will miss her greatly. I love you Diahann, and I will never forget your wisdom, generosity of spirit, and the ever present twinkle in you eye. You broke so many boundaries, and you helped me to have the courage to push through my own. Thank you for the memories, and Rest In Peace. What a life you lived. Our hearts and thoughts are with her family today. #diahanncarroll

      A post shared by Matt Bomer (@mattbomer) on Oct 4, 2019 at 9:38am PDT

      Hilarie Burton

      “Working with Diahann Carroll was one of the great honors of my career. Funny, classy, stunning, warm. The first scene we shared, I opened an apartment door to find her. She winked at me. Pure mischief. I lost my words. She made this world a more glamorous place. @WhiteCollarUSA” – via Twitter

      Dana Delany

      “I once met the legendary Diahann Carroll at a luncheon in Toronto. I told her that when she starred in Julia, people used to say my mother looked like her. Without blinking an eye, she said “Was she very beautiful?” Ms Carroll was a Goddess.” — via Twitter

      Al Roker

      “Tony & Golden Globe award winning, Oscar & Emmy nominated pioneering actress Diahann Carroll has passed at 84. It was an honor to get to meet and talk with her. Her show, JULIA, made tv history with her at the helm.” — via Twitter

      Sanaa Lathan

      “Rest In Peace Queen #DiahannCarroll” — via Twitter

      Ruth E. Carter

      “It’s was an honor to work with the great Diahann Carroll. I looked up to her. She excelled in a time when being a black woman was not synonymous with beauty and class. She broke through. We hailed to her knowledge and class. She gave our culture elegance. She was a true queen.” — via Twitter

        Mario Cantone

        “Rest In Peace Diahann Carroll. Amazing. Beautiful. Historical.” — via Twitter

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        Tom Green Has One Big Regret About Drew Barrymore and SNL

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        Tom Green was never more famous than when he hosted Saturday Night Live on Nov. 18, 2000.

        Not only was his insanely popular talk show still airing on MTV, he was coming off a scene-stealing performance in the hit comedy Road Trip. Just weeks earlier, Charlies Angels, in which Green appeared opposite his new fiance Drew Barrymore, debuted at No. 1 at the box office.

        It was an amazing thing to have gotten to do it, Green says of his SNL experience, 19 years later, on this weeks episode of The Last Laugh podcast. However, he adds, I think if I could go back and do it again someday, I would do it a lot differently.

        When producer Lorne Michaels offered Green the chance to host that fall, the comedian insisted that his childhood friends from Canada, whom he had hired as writers on The Tom Green Show, come in for the week and help write sketches. I didnt understand the politics of Saturday Night Live, he says, acknowledging that SNLs writers at the time, including Mike Schur, who would go on to create The Good Place, future Oscar nominee Adam McKay and head writer Tina Fey, may not have appreciated the input.

        I was aggressively trying to deconstruct everything that I encountered, Green explains. Just because I was a kid in my twenties and I was like, thats the way you do it. Lets try to take it apart and put it back together upside down and inside out.

        I think in hindsight I would have rather just shown up and worked with everybody else and just kind of went with the flow a bit more, he adds. But I was young and passionate. Green says his friends ended up writing about half of the sketches that aired in his episode, including one in which he appeared in a bathtub with Lorne Michaels as well as his monologue and the final sketch of the night.

        Greens big idea for the episode was a gag that would be teased at the beginning of the show and pay off in the final moments. His relationship with Barrymore was all over the tabloids and he thought it would be funny if they appeared together during his monologue and announced they would be getting married on live television at the end of his SNL debut.

        I try not to have regrets, but that is something that I actually regret, Green says. So Drew and I actually were engaged at the time. So we thought, this will be a funny prank. Well prank the audience. Well tell everyone were going to get married on SNL and then she wont show up at the altar at the end and that will be the punchline. Even though we were still getting married, like a month after. That was the bit.

        But the thing I regret about that bit to this day, which Im actually sad about, to be honest with you, is that the way we wrote the bit, we kept teasing that we were going to get married at the end of the showshes out in the hallway in her wedding dress, my parents are there in the audience, he continues. And then at the end of the show, she doesnt show up. And the end of my SNL I have a meltdown on stage. And its a complete meltdown and the band stops playing and the entire cast disappears and Im just standing alone on stage at the very end of the show.

        Artistically, Green still thinks it was a pretty awesome way to end the show. But it does sort of ruin my beautiful Saturday Night Live kumbaya moment, he says. At the end of every Saturday Night Live, [the host] is hanging out with the cast and celebrating together. But on his episode, its just Green screaming I thought you loved me! on stage by himself.

        In some ways, its kind of a metaphor for the rebellious, naive kid that I was: Were going to go there and were going to try to turn SNL upside down! he says. But in other ways, I think it just sort of ruined my Saturday Night Live experience. He does add that he and Barrymore went to the after party with the cast and had a blast.

        Green maintains that it was one of the highest-rated episodes that season because of the prank. It was a massive success in that sense, because we did create a reason to stay up til the end, he says.

        According to a Variety item from that week, the cancelation of the wedding was sprung on Lorne Michaels only five minutes before the ceremony was to take place on camera and the show reportedly had a priest and City Hall license on hand. Caroline Kennedy, Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson, Gwyneth Paltrow, Cameron Diaz, and Harvey Weinstein were among the celebrities waiting backstage to celebrate with the newlyweds after the show.

        To put it in perspective how crazy his life was at that time, Green tells me that the morning after Saturday Night Live aired, he and Barrymore got on a plane to London to have dinner with Prince Charles at St. Jamess Palace for the royal premiere of Charlies Angels.

        Green sat next to Camilla Parker Bowles at the dinner and had a two-hour conversation about stuff like France and organic farming among other topics. Was it a real mouse? Prince Charles asked Green of the infamous scene from Road Trip in which he attempts to feed a snake and ends up putting a live mouse in his mouth. The answer was yes.

        Green and Barymore ultimately did get married in July of 2001 and were divorced less than nine months later. Green has called their marriage a crazy whirlwind of a time.

        So it was a bizarre time in my life, Green tells me. If he ever gets the chance to host SNL again, which would be nice, he says, I would love to be able to not bring my friends from high school in and not try to make it some crazy, warped episode.

        Nearly two decades later, the 48-year-old comedian chalks the whole thing up to the naivety of youth.

        I had been so hellbent on causing chaos everywhere I went that suddenly when I was where I was, I still was behaving as if I was living in my parents basement, Green says. I should have probably taken certain opportunities to just be grateful that I was there. And I didnt realize that at the time.

        Next week on The Last Laugh podcast: Stand-up comedian and star of ABCs Black-ish and Grown-ish, Deon Cole.

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        The Politician, God Help Us, May Be the Future of TV

        NEWSLETTERS
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        Everything we cant stop loving, hating, and thinking about this week in pop culture.
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        This week:

        • Wrapping our heads around The Politician
        • Living for the J. Lo moment. (J. Loment)
        • Employing our fashion expertise.
        • The best Emmys photos.
        • Wendy Williams has not seen Fleabag.
        The Politician Is a Wild Binge… but Is That Good?

        The Politician, the new Ryan Murphy series that hits Netflix on Friday, is a simple show. A boy named Payton, played by Ben Platt, wants to be class president and, one day, president of the United States.

        Well, theres that. Theres also a bisexual love triangle, a suicide, a staged kidnapping, a murder investigation, Gwyneth Paltrow having an affair with Martina Navratilova, a deaf school principal, a whistleblower with cerebral palsy, a poisoning through cupcakes, a poisoning via BB gun, a staging of the musical Assassins, January Jones as a pill-popping former hooker, a performance of Joni Mitchells The River, a throuple featuring Judith Light, and a ghost mentor/therapist.

        And thats all not to mention Jessica Langes role as a grandmother with Munchausen-by-proxy who poisons her granddaughter and tells her she has cancer.

        That The Politician does SO MUCH is its fatal flaw, because scaled back to its core, to that simple logline, it is legitimately fascinating and provocative. Given the state of the world and the kind of behavior that isnt just excused, but rewardedand given who is, ahem, sitting in the White Housewhat kind of person would want to be a politician? What kind of ambition does that take? What does ambition mean, or require, in 2019? And what about us: What moral compromises are we willing to justify so that we dont have to be leaders ourselves? Its cynical and optimistic in warring ways that feel just about right given the mood of today.

        Its a shame thats essentially drowned in the flood of constant lunacy. Its tonally all over the place. Respective elements of it are intriguing and occasionally fantastic. Platt is a captivating actor, capable of both Election-like camp and emotional rawness in equal measure. The storyline between him and Paltrow, who plays his mother, is remarkably tender, elevated all the more by the Oscar-winners stirring performance. And no one does big comedy with dame-like flair more skillfully than Jessica Lange.

        But that the show doesnt seem to know what it is becomes clearer as the episodes continue and actors whose plot lines never meetlike Paltrow and Langeseem to think they are in entirely different shows. Paltrow is acting with the grounded sincerity of someone on a Murphy show like American Crime Story. Lange is doing broad, satirical work straight out of Glee. The large ensemble falls on the spectrum in between.

        The truly remarkable thing, however, is that for how mixed and meh I feel about the series, I could not be more excited for a Season Two. The standout final episode of the show sets up a Season Two featuring Platt, Light, and Bette Midler. Other critics have wondered why the series didnt just start there.

        And thats what makes this show such a captivating test case. Of the many reasons Im obsessed with the serieshello, did you catch that part about Paltrow and Martina Navratilova?the biggest is that its existence provides a window into what may be the next stage of television, at a time when the medium is in a curious stage of transition.

        The Politician is Ryan Murphys first Netflix series, and he now has a massive $300 million deal with the streamer. The series is the first example of how a slew of celebrated TV auteurs will take advantage of the seemingly free rein and bottomless bank accounts they have access to while transitioning from networks to streaming services. (Shonda Rhimes and Kenya Barris first shows under their respective, massive Netflix deals have yet to air.)

        With the streaming service apocalypse nighApple TV+, HBO Max, and Disney+, oh my!the ways in which these major names adapt to the new landscape is fascinating in its own right. And with The Politician especially, imperfect as it is, every decision, from the casting to the camera work to the tone and the themes merit dissection. From that standpoint, the show is as addicting as series get; its interesting to see what Murphy produces when the intention is to binge.

        Is messy the new norm? Will people watch anyway? With so much content racing toward us, and as expensive and expensive-looking as that content is, is a series mere ambition and the promise of an interesting season two enough to merit endorsement? In the case of The Politician, were surprising even ourselves by voting yes.

        The Jennifer Lopezaissance Is Here and Its Real

        I cannot express to you how thrilling the Jennifer Lopez MOMENT we are having is for me. Her accolades for Hustlers? As moving to me as when I met my baby nephews for the first time. That she could win an Oscar? Sweet, sweet vindication for someone who loved every batshit second of The Boy Next Door and watched it twice in theaters, accounting for two of the three film screenings I bought tickets to that year. That, somehow, the news about her has somehow gotten even more exciting? I could cry.

        First came the iconic moment that was her walking the runway at a Versace show in Milan in a replica of the jungle-print gown she wore to the Grammy Awards 20 years ago. It wasnt even that she looked so jaw-droppingly stunning in the dress, at age 50, or that she had the showbiz wisdom to celebrate the anniversary in that way. Its the way she wore it. (Watch it here.)

        What I cant stop swooning over in the video is that not only did she wear the dress, but she also worked the runway like that. She didnt just come out with a knowing smile and wave at the audience while teetering around getting applause. She treated that runway walk like a job. Perfection.

        And if you think Im being histrionic about any of this, well, gird your loins, babe, youre not ready for my ecstatic mania over the news that Lopez will be performing the Super Bowl Halftime Show alongside Shakira. That is how you book a show, football people in charge of such things, whoever you are. I am not overselling it when I say that Lopez ranks among the most dynamic live performers in the business, whatever you may think about her music. (Want proof? Watch this video.)

        That this will be taking place two days before Oscars voting ends is just *chefs kiss* magnificent. When her Best Supporting Actress competition is out shaking hands and answering bland questions at screening Q&As, Lopez will be setting the stage on fire on the biggest entertainment event of the year. Will such a blazing reminder of her breadth of talents win her an Oscar? Well, it wont hurt

        Best Dressed at the Emmys!

        I am not a fashion reporter, know nothing about labels and designers, and abjectly have no sense of style. But I am gay!!! So take it with that authority that I pronounce Mandy Moores red-carpet look at this years Emmys to be Best Dressed. I love it! She looks great! Sexy high-fashion first lady is a sensational look on her. Good for you, Mandy!

        Speaking of the Emmys

        The combination of these two photos taken after Fleabag swept the night, the first of creator and star Phoebe Waller-Bridge and the second of co-star Andrew Scott partying with A Very English Scandal winner Ben Whishaw, just about killed me.

        And Speaking of Fleabag

        Wendy Williams does not know what that is. Hey, not everyone has Amazon Prime. I dont know why, but this video makes me laugh so much. (Watch it here.)

        What to watch this week:

        Judy: What Rene Zellweger does in this film is astonishing.

        Sorry for Your Loss: I bet you didnt know Facebook had an original series, or that its this good.

        Abominable: It looks cute!

        Transparent Musicale Finale: Judith Light sings a song called Your Boundary Is My Trigger. Out of its mind.

        What to skip this week:

        Transparent Musicale Finale: On the other hand, sometimes out of its mind is just out of its mind.

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        Controversial As It May Be, ‘Screen Time’ Makes Me A Better Mom

        Before I became a parent, I vowed to do (and not do) a lot of things. My daughter was going to be breastfed until she was 1, and she’d eat all-natural, organic, homemade meals. She would never use a binkie and would rarely touch a bottle. Screen time? She would be limited to 30 minutes a day. 

        Of course, my plan seemed fail-proof. I was 29 when I conceived my daughter: a work-from-home, stay-at-home mom. And my husband supported me. We agreed today’s kids were too distant and distracted. We were “those people,” the ones who judged the parents who broke out the iPads at dinner. Plus, we had read all the studies. Childless me knew best — or so I thought. Or so I believed. Until we had kids and “dinner dates” and things to do on our own.

        You see, it is easy to live in a disillusioned little bubble. Before children, I was smug. Scratch that: I was stupid and naive. And while I felt guilty, at least in the “early days” — the first time I used the television to distract my daughter, I felt like a bad parent; I convinced myself I was a “bad” mom — these days I believe the opposite to be true.

        Screen time makes me a better mom. 

        The first time I used the television to distract my daughter, I felt like a bad parent; I convinced myself I was a ‘bad’ mom — these days I believe the opposite to be true.

        Now I know what some of you might be thinking: That’s ridiculous. That’s absurd. Only crappy parents rely on Netflix and cable to care for their kids. Plus, the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly suggests parents limit media use. Kids under 5 should watch no more than 60 minutes each day, and those under 2 should watch no TV … at all. And while I do not dispute or refute the experts — these guidelines are in place for good reason — there are things science and studies fail to consider.

        My daughter is a Type A personality. She is high-strung, high-stressed and always on the go. She attends school every morning, dances almost every evening, and her weekends are spent running, both miles and errands. Some days I need to help her destress and decompress.

        Like most 6-year-olds, she gets worked up and “amped up” and watching a cartoon (or two) gives her a chance to shut off her mind.

        But there are other reasons — more selfish reasons — I let her watch TV. I am a stay-at-home and work-from-home mom. I have virtual meetings to attend and deadlines to meet, and giving her screen time gives me “me” time. I am able to write while she catches up on ”She-Ra,” “Sesame Street” and ”DC Super Hero Girls.” And while this may sound bad, at least on paper, I believe I am teaching my daughter responsibility. Through my actions, she knows women work. Hard. I am helping my daughter become more independent. When Mommy works, she gets her own snacks, drinks and toys, and I am teaching my daughter about balance. When the episodes are over, I’m done. I put my phone down and laptop away and we play.

        I am active, engaged and fully present.

        I am also calmer. News writing can be a fast-paced, demanding industry but setting boundaries — for her and me — has helped me unwind.

        I believe I am teaching my daughter responsibility. Through my actions, she knows women work. Hard. I am helping my daughter become more independent.

        There are other benefits, too. Television helps me talk to my child on her level. “Sesame Street” has spurred conversations about race, anxiety, diversity and disability. I’ve used Oscar the Grouch to explain that we cannot change another’s attitude but can love them in spite of it. He is also a key example of why you cannot (and should not) judge a book by their cover, and countless “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood” songs have worked their way into my home. I’ve found Daniel’s “When You Feel So Mad” song particularly useful.

        In short, television has opened dialogues between me and my daughter. Cartoons have helped me be more engaged with my kids.

        The TV has taught my daughter. Thanks to “Super Why,” she knew her alphabet at 2, and thanks (again) to “Sesame Street,” she was able to count to 20 by age 3. And I use the screen as a motivator. My daughter earns episodes or “tablet time” when she completes chores, e.g., making her bed earns 15 minutes while doing her homework gets her 30.

        TV time also gives us a chance to cuddle — something I fully appreciate as the mom of a high-energy kid — and to make memories. “The Nightmare Before Christmas” is a Halloween tradition, and we always spend Christmas week watching “Rudolph,” “Frosty the Snowman” and “The Grinch.”

        Television has opened dialogues between me and my daughter. Cartoons have helped me be more engaged with my kids.

        That said, I have a few “rules.” During meals, the TV is off. The dinner table is a screen-free zone. All programming must be supervised. I will not let my daughter watch a new series unless I can watch an episode with her first, and on weekdays, she is limited to two hours max, and that’s what works for me and my family.

        To each their own because I know better. I know not to judge other parents and how they parent. 

        So at the end of the day remember: It doesn’t matter what our kids watch or eat, it matters what they do, what they say, what they feel and how they act, and only you know what is best for them. Only you can decide what works for your family, your child and you.

        Have a compelling first-person story or experience you want to share? Send your story description to pitch@huffpost.com.

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