Timini Is Single Until Married | Wake Up Nigeria Hosts Discuss Timini In Cheating Scandal

Actor Timini in cheating scandal: A tweet made by one Toju, alleged that she has been sleeping with Timini times without number, indirectly firing shots at Lydia (Timini’s girlfriend). Is cheating a big deal when you’re not married?

#WakeUpNigeriaOnTVC #CoffeeGist

Watch TVC on GOTV Ch. 27, StarTimes Ch. 121, PLAY TV Ch. 801, UHF Ch. 49

Subscribe to TVC: https://bit.ly/2PWLUir

Watch TVC Live: https://bit.ly/1nms2zw

Check out TVC website: http://tvcentertainment.tv

Follow TVC on social media: @TVCconnect

Like TVC on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tvcconnect

Follow TVC on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tvcconnect

Follow TVC on Instagram: http://instagram.com/tvcconnect

More videos from the TVC network: http://Youtube.com/tvcentertainment.tv

This content was originally published here.

Related posts

Facebook ranks last in digital trust among consumers

Summary List Placement

When it comes to protecting users’ personal information and providing a safe online environment, social network users in the US give lower marks to Facebook, TikTok, and Twitter. According to Insider Intelligence’s annual “US Digital Trust Survey,” LinkedIn is the most trusted social platform overall. We define digital trust as the confidence users have in a social media platform to protect their information and provide a safe environment for them to create and engage with content.

In the 2020 “US Digital Trust Survey,” we evaluated consumer perceptions of the major social networks within five categories of trust: security, legitimacy, community, ad experience, and ad relevance*. We ranked nine platforms—Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, reddit, Snapchat, TikTok, Twitter, and YouTube—according to how our respondents perceived them along those five pillars of digital trust. We fielded the online survey of 1,865 US respondents ages 18 to 74 between May 28, 2020 and June 3, 2020, using a sample provided by a third party.

We found that Facebook was the least trusted social media platform regarding data privacy. Nearly one-third (32%) of US Facebook users at least somewhat disagreed that they had confidence in the platform to protect their data and privacy. Just 10% of LinkedIn’s users said the same of the professional network.How Much Do US Social Media Users Agree That Social Media Platforms Protect Their Privacy and Data

“Two years after the Cambridge Analytica scandal, we expect that Facebook’s massive data privacy issues during that time have persisted in public memory and continue to be a black mark on its record,” said Audrey Schomer, senior research analyst at Insider Intelligence. “This is likely driving nearly one-third of US Facebook users to continue to view Facebook as a platform that doesn’t adequately protect their data. Our research highlights the great importance of data privacy protections by social networks to ensure that user engagement data isn’t mishandled or misappropriated.” 

A majority (53%) of US Facebook users at least somewhat agreed that the platform protects their data and privacy, but this was the lowest share of respondents among all platforms we measured. 

“To Facebook’s credit, it has made efforts to give users more control over their data through opt-in and opt-out features tied to what data is shared and what ads they’re shown, as well as by increasing its own transparency into what data is collected,” said Daniel Carnahan, research analyst at Insider Intelligence. “Nevertheless, it appears that these efforts are still having only minimal effects on US user sentiment.”

TikTok and Twitter were the next-to-worst performers when it came to confidence in their user data and privacy handling. About one in five US TikTok and Twitter users (22% and 21%, respectively) at least somewhat lacked confidence in the platforms to protect their data and privacy. While majority shares of the two platforms’ respective users felt confident that their data and privacy was being protected, they were still less confident compared with users of other platforms. For TikTok, intensifying scrutiny from the US government has likely had a negative impact on some users’ confidence in the app. When our survey was conducted, many US legislators were voicing their concerns about TikTok’s connections to the Chinese government. As for Twitter, it had already come under fire in 2019 for sharing some users’ data with advertisers without their permission. It also fixed a bug that accidentally collected and shared user location data.

LinkedIn and Pinterest ranked highest when it came to confidence in their ability to provide security. Nearly three-quarters (73%) of LinkedIn users and 66% of Pinterest users at least somewhat agreed that the respective platforms protect their privacy and data. LinkedIn and Pinterest have each received very little media attention related to data privacy issues, which likely contributes to their more positive perceptions among users.

What the Results Mean

Digital trust is important for brands and advertisers to consider because US social users say it impacts whether they will interact with the ads they see on social platforms. Even if security scandals don’t drive users to stop using social platforms, our data indicates that the trust users have—or don’t have—in social platforms could impact their interactions with ads or sponsored content. In fact, 79% of respondents said whether a platform protects their privacy and data was either extremely or very impactful when it comes to their decision to engage with ads. And 30% of respondents said that whether a platform shows them relevant ads had an extremely or very high impact.

This article was originally published on eMarketer.

Interested in getting the full report?

Join the conversation about this story »

Related posts

Learning from Death: How We Change When Losing a Loved One

There is no easy way to write about death that doesn’t risk trivializing it or being overwhelmed by it. Fortunately, I have never suffered a tragedy, such as the loss of a child or spouse or family member before their natural time.

You don’t have to lose someone or face your own death to learn from it.

I have spent a lot of time personally and professionally with people who have had to grapple with the questions that none of us have answers:   

Why did this happen? 

What did I do wrong? 

How can I make this pain go away? 

If I could only have… 

With all the pain of loss and grief, I do like one aspect of what death does to those left behind: it pushes out all the extraneous noise of our lives and forces us to deal with only that which really matters. Most often, someone who has been shattered by a loss is very, very real. It’s almost like you’re speaking to someone on a drug when what comes out is pure, true, and undefended. 

I find such experience deeply grounding, and I enjoy being in an atmosphere of such truth. It is at such times that I understand what might draw someone to work in hospice care. The opportunity to work in an environment where everything is on the line, where there is no point in pretense, where life is stripped down to the bare essentials: it seems to me it’s like a spiritual backpack trip. You have only what you really need to survive; everything else is extra baggage you don’t want to carry. You are reminded of how little you really need, and how simple and pure life can be.

 Sometimes when I’m working with a couple, and they’re sniping at each other over the “he said/she said” of married life, I cut through the static with the following intervention:   

I have them sit across from each other and fill in the blank to the sentence – “If I knew I was going to die tomorrow, what I would want you to know today is…” 

That gets their attention. They immediately drop out of the argument and say things like “I love you” or “I’m sorry I wasn’t a better husband/wife.” 

Why does this happen? 

I think most of the time, most of the day, our ego is running the show. We are concerned first and foremost with the survival of the “I” of the ego. This can take countless forms, but just a few examples to help you know what I mean would include:  

Worrying about what I get out of this situation

How I look to others or wanting to hurt someone who hurt me

Wanting to fend off possible criticism

Needing to be right  

All of the above actions are about the importance of Ego.  

We don’t know what happens when we die. 

Although most of us have beliefs about it. Here’s one of the things I feel relatively sure about: the ego dies with the body.

If any part of us survives our physical death, I cannot believe it is that aspect of us which worries how we look, if only because I see how that drops away in those who have just lost someone. 

Letting death be our teacher, through making us aware of what truly matters, is one of the best ways I know to be truly alive.  

If you knew you were dying tomorrow, what would you do differently today?

If you’re struggling with loss, grief, and death, we’re here to help with Imago  and . We also have Online Couples Therapy and Online Couples Workshops right now!  

 Josh GresselThis blog post was written by Josh Gressel, a clinical psychologist and certified Imago therapist in practice in the San Francisco Bay Area.

He is the author of  (University of America Press, 2014) and “Disposable Diapers, Envy, and the Kibbutz: What Happens to an Emotion Based on Difference in a Society Based on Equality?” in Envy at Work and in Organizations (Oxford University Press, 2017).  He has just completed a book on masculinity.  

Check out Josh’s website: joshgressel.com

Related posts

The Supreme Court Vacancy After Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Death: Live Updates – The New York Times

Mr. Trump, who rolled out a new list of possible Supreme Court picks last week before there was a vacancy, seized the political initiative early Saturday, issuing a thinly veiled warning to any Republicans thinking about delaying a vote until after the November election.

The president rejected suggestions that he should wait to let the winner of the Nov. 3 contest fill the vacancy, much as Mr. McConnell insisted four years ago in blocking President Barack Obama from filling an election-year vacancy on the court.

“We won and we have an obligation as the winners to pick who we want,” Mr. Trump said. “That’s not the next president. Hopefully, I’ll be the next president. But we’re here now, right now, we’re here, and we have an obligation to the voters, all of the people, the millions of people who put us here.”

For the Biden team, the death of Justice Ginsburg represents a challenge of a different sort.

As Shane Goldmacher, Katie Glueck and Thomas Kaplan report, Joseph R. Biden Jr. has spent months condemning President Trump as a failed steward of the nation’s well-being, relentlessly framing the 2020 election as a referendum on the president’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Now, confronted with a moment that many believe will upend the 2020 election, the Biden campaign is sticking to what it believes is a winning strategy. Campaign aides said on Saturday they would seek to link the Supreme Court vacancy to the health emergency gripping the country and the future of health care in America.

While confirmation fights have long centered on hot-button cultural divides like guns and especially abortion, the Biden campaign, at least at the start, plans to focus chiefly on protecting the Affordable Care Act and its popular guarantee of coverage for people with pre-existing conditions.

“Americans re-elected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary,” Mr. McConnell said in a statement on Friday night. “Once again, we will keep our promise. President Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.”

The more moderate Republican senators are a small group, and it is not clear whether they could control enough votes to block Mr. Trump’s nominee. Republicans have 53 votes in the Senate to the Democrats’ 47, and Vice President Mike Pence is allowed to break any ties.

Related posts

Detective Agencies, Film Noir and Society’s Relationship to the Elderly: Maite Alberdi on Her Doc, The Mole Agent | Filmmaker Magazine

ChileThe Mole Agent

Responding to a help-wanted ad, 85-year-old Sergio Chamy agrees to infiltrate a Santiago nursing home as a “mole agent” to find out if a client’s mother is being abused. As a “spy” he uncovers a hidden world of frustration and loneliness. 

Maite Alberdi’s documentary borrows from film noir before evolving into an unsettling look at the lives of the elderly. It was developed with the help of the Sundance Institute Documentary Film Program and the Tribeca Film Institute. The Mole Agent screened at Sundance, and is available on demand starting September 1.

Filmmaker spoke with Alberdi from her office in Santiago.

Filmmaker: How did you start on this project?

Maite Alberdi: I wanted to make a documentary about private detectives. I’m a super fan of film noir and pulp fiction, and I realized that I never saw a documentary that centered around a detective agency. That was my starting point. I researched agencies, which is how I met Romulo, a retired police officer who had his own shop. He handled several “mole” cases. I worked with him a couple of times, and one of the cases involved the retirement home. I realized I wanted to shoot there.

Filmmaker: What did you do for Romulo?

Alberdi: I followed people. I would meet with clients, interview them, take notes. Then I had cases where parents wanted to follow their children, or I followed couples. A lot of things.

Romulo usually worked with the same mole, but he broke his hip and had to be replaced when we were ready to start shooting. Romulo put an ad in the paper to find and train a new mole.

Filmmaker: So in effect Romulo cast Sergio.

Alberdi: No, he wasn’t going to pick Sergio. I had to convince him. Romulo wanted someone else, someone I didn’t think was empathetic. The one Romulo liked was accompanied by his wife during the interview. And Romulo being super-machismo, I could say, “Maybe the wife will be there all the time. She could be a problem. That won’t happen with Sergio.”

Filmmaker: You were like a private eye yourself, investigating the investigators.

Alberdi: Exactly. I feel Sergio’s job is super-similar to my job as documentary filmmaker. Because when I’m shooting, I spend a lot of time, waiting, waiting, until I have the scene. Documentary filmmaking requires a lot of patience. Some days I never press “rec” because nothing interesting is happening. For Sergio it’s the same, he’s waiting, following people, waiting, waiting until he takes the pictures or until he gets the proof that he needs. 

I’m always spying on people. They know I’m there, that’s the big difference. I observe people without participating.

Filmmaker: How did you persuade the nursing home to agree to filming?

Alberdi: We said that I want to make a film about old age. I had previously released a film in Chile about older people, so it wasn’t weird that I wanted to shoot there. We said we would shoot both the good things and the bad things that happen there. So if we see something bad, we will show it. They signed an agreement to that effect. Then we said, if someone new arrives we want to focus on their experiences. That they allowed too. We introduced ourselves to the staff, and we started to shoot inside the retirement home for three weeks before Sergio arrives. When he came, we acted as if we didn’t know each other.

There was a real client, a real case that Sergio was working on. It was a family problem, someone wanted to prove to her brothers and sisters that their mom wasn’t okay there. Of course I started to realize that the nursing home was a good place, and then I felt super-guilty about lying to them. 

When we finished the film, they were the first people we showed it to. I said, “I lied to you, it was a film about a mole.” When they saw it, they loved it. They cried a lot. Now they are the best promoters of the film.

Filmmaker: One of the saddest aspects of The Mole Agent is that it shows how even with a good environment and a caring staff, the elderly have trouble dealing with isolation.

Alberdi: We always put the blame on the institution. Like with school, and my kids, it’s always the teacher’s fault. But I’m the one who’s not building a community there.

With retirement homes it’s the same. We put our old people there and forget them. We don’t work to make it a good place, a community. You can correct the problem by connecting them with families, integrating them into society. In Latin America it’s really common to isolate older people. It was the same with my previous film [The Grown-Ups, 2016], which was about people with Down Syndrome. Their parents put them in a special needs school, and fifty years later they’re still there.

Filmmaker: Your visual style is arresting. The Mole Agent settles into the rhythms of the elderly, and the imagery that reflects their feelings.  Can you talk about collaborating with cinematographer Pablo Valdés?

Alberdi: I have been working with Pablo for 10 years, we’ve made, I think, five films together. Here I really wanted to make a film noir, I wanted to shoot angles like a fiction film. We had some style references, but we ended up using the same techniques we always use.

We spend a lot of time with people until they get used to the camera. I would try to figure out which ones didn’t, so we wouldn’t shoot them. The people in the home have a routine that doesn’t change very much. They have lunch at the same time, for example. It’s like my life, I don’t change that much, I know my routine. So if I know, I can predict how things are going to happen, and at what time and place.

We spend a lot of time planning the frame. And then it’s wait. For example, that’s why I don’t use a handheld camera. Because we can never wait that long holding a camera. I would love to make a film with a more mobile camera, but we can’t move. 

Filmmaker: You said in an interview that reality is cyclical, and that you discover patterns within it.

Alberdi: I don’t make films about the past. I am shooting in the present in all of my films. When I’m shooting, I trust that if I wait, the things that I saw before will happen again. I don’t know when, but they are going to happen. So as I saw the other mole cases, in my mind I knew what kind of things Romulo was going to ask Sergio. So I knew what I am going to shoot.

I’m going to give you an example from the first film where I learned that. It’s called  A Lifeguard (El salvavidas, 2011). The main character thinks that the best lifeguard is the one who never needs to go into the water — he prevents accidents from happening. But he works at the most dangerous beach in Chile, where every summer someone drowns. My concern was, okay, I have a film about the lifeguard. He has to face whether or not to go into the water. And I need that in my narrative. But how can I shoot that I’m shooting a second character, or I’m running around someplace else?

Okay, I have to study the behavior at this beach. I spent a summer trying to understand the routines there. I studied the marine statistics. I learned that all of the people drowned at the same place between five and six in the evening. I didn’t know which day it was going to happen, but I knew the time and the place. So we spent all the summer in the same place at the same time waiting. We were there when it happened, and we have it in the film.

Filmmaker: But you’re still selecting, choosing as you go along. There is a scene in The Mole Agent you couldn’t have predicted, when a frightened woman breaks down into tears in front of Sergio.

Alberdi: In some ways you can predict, because you learn the world there. There were 50 women in the home, and we choose six to follow because we knew something was going to happen to them. That woman, for example, she’s saying her son didn’t come to visit. That’s something she said to other people, something she said to me. So I knew when Sergio introduced himself, she would say something similar.

Filmmaker: That moment reaches a universal truth, the fear everyone faces about growing old. It stripped away the rest of the narrative framework for me.

Alberdi: I believe that documentary filmmaking is like being a sculptor. You have this big rock that is reality, and it is big, because that place has a lot of people. You have to chisel until a figure appears. The decision about what you are taking out is more important than what you are keeping.

Filmmaker: You had 300 hours of material. How difficult was the editing process?

Alberdi: We had a lot of versions. For example that scene you mentioned, at the time I shot it I was living with Sergio in the home. I was living the same feelings as he did. I had the same emotional commitments. And I have to deal in the editing with how to balance the original case, and my emotional experiences. 

We shot the case, the client, all the details about her. In the beginning I thought I had to explain everything, and until the end what I was shooting, the narrative plot, was the case itself. In the editing room I found my heart was not in the case. Yeah, it was rational, it advanced the story. But my emotions were what was driving me forward. It was super-difficult to realize that, to say for example, “Okay, the client is not going to appear after all.”

It took me a year to remove the client and make the movie Sergio’s journey. Or, for example, the decision to put myself in a shot. That was an editing decision. We edited in the Netherlands and showed it to a lot of Dutch people who kept asking, “Is this really a documentary?” I didn’t want people to get lost, I preferred to put that in the beginning to make it easier for you to enter into the story.

Filmmaker: What’s your next project?

Alberdi: We are very early in shooting about a young couple. The man is fifty years old, he has Alzheimer’s, and it’s a love story about how the couple deals with that. Covid has made it terrible for them, and for me too because I can no longer shoot them. But she’s started shooting, and has brought a new life to the project. 

It’s frustrating for everybody, not just me. It’s difficult after working on this for so many years to try to adapt to new forms of exhibition. My mind needs to be more open.

Related posts

Facebook wants to know how it’s shaping the 2020 elections — researchers say it’s looking too late and in the wrong places (FB)

Summary List Placement

Facebook was first warned in late 2015 that Cambridge Analytica was misusing data illicitly harvested from millions of Americans in an attempt to sway the 2016 US elections.

It didn’t pull the plug on the firm’s access to user data until March 2018 after reporting from The Guardian turned the breach into a global scandal.

More than two years later — and barely two months before the deadline for votes to cast their ballots in the 2020 elections — Facebook has decided it wants to know more about how it impacts democracy, announcing last week that it would partner with 17 researchers to study the impact of Facebook and Instagram on voters’ attitudes and actions.

But researchers outside of the project are conflicted. While they praised Facebook for promising to ensure more transparency and independence than it has before, they also questioned why the company waited so long and just how much this study will really bring to light.

“Isn’t this a little bit too late?” Fadi Quran, a campaign director with nonprofit research group Avaaz, told Business Insider.

“Facebook has known now for a long time that there’s election interference, that malicious actors are using the platform to influence voters,” he said. “Why is this only happening now at such a late stage?” 

Facebook said it doesn’t “expect to publish any findings until mid-2021 at the earliest.” The company did not reply to a request for comment on this story.

Since the company is leaving it to the research team to decide which questions to ask and draw their own conclusions — a good thing — we don’t yet know much about what they hope to learn. In its initial announcement, Facebook said it’s curious about: “whether social media makes us more polarized as a society, or if it largely reflects the divisions that already exist; if it helps people to become better informed about politics, or less; or if it affects people’s attitudes towards government and democracy, including whether and how they vote.”

Facebook executives have reportedly known the answer to that first question — that the company’s algorithms do help polarize and radicalize people — and that they knowingly shut down efforts to fix the issue or even research it more.

But even setting that aside, researchers say they’ve already identified some potential shortcomings in the study.

“A lot of the focus of this work is very much about how honest players are using these systems,” Laura Edelson, a researcher who studies political ads and misinformation at New York University, told Business Insider.

“Where I’m concerned is that they’re almost exclusively not looking at the ways that things are going wrong, and that’s where I wish this was going further,” she added.

Quran echoed that assessment, saying: “One big thing that they’re going to miss by not looking more deeply at these malicious actors, and just by the design, is the scale of content that’s been created by these actors and that’s influencing public opinion.”

A long list of research and media reports have documented Facebook’s struggles to effectively keep political misinformation off its platform — let alone misleading health claims, which despite Facebook’s more aggressive approach, still racked up four times as many views as posts from sites pushing accurate information, according to Avaaz. 

But political information is much more nuanced and constantly evolving, and even in what seem to be clear-cut cases, Facebook has, according to reports, at times incorrectly enforced its own policies or bent over backward to avoid possible political backlash.

Quran and Edelson both worried that Facebook’s election study may not capture the full impact of aspects of the platform like its algorithms, billions of fake accounts, or private groups.

“You find what you go and you look for,” Edelson said. “The great problem of elections on Facebook is not how the honest actors are working within the system.”

Quran also said, though it’s too early say this will happen for sure, that because it’s Facebook asking users directly within their apps to join the study, sometimes in exchange for payment, it risks inadvertently screening out people who are distrustful of the company to begin with.

“We’re already seeing posts on different groups that share disinformation telling people: ‘Don’t participate in the study, this is a Facebook conspiracy'” to spy on users or keep Republicans off the platform ahead of the election, he said. “What this could lead to, potentially, is that the people most impacted by disinformation are not even part of the study.”

In a best-case scenario, Edelson said the researchers could learn valuable information about how our existing understanding of elections maps onto the digital world. Quran said the study could even serve as an “information ecosystem impact assessment,” similar to environmental impact studies, that would help Facebook understand how changes it could make might impact the democratic process.

But both were skeptical that Facebook would make major changes based on this study or the 2020 elections more broadly. And Quran warned that, despite Facebook’s efforts to make the study independent, people shouldn’t take the study as definitive or allow it to become a “stamp of approval.”

It took Facebook nearly four years from when it learned about Cambridge Analytica to identify the tens of thousands of apps that were also misusing data. And though it just published the results of its first independent civil rights audit, the company has made few commitments to implement any of the auditors’ recommendations.

Join the conversation about this story »

Related posts

Twitter reacts to landmark new poll on Scottish independence | The National

Commissioned by Business for Scotland, the Panelbase poll has delighted the Yes movement.

Politicians and commentators have taken to social media to give their thoughts.

Here a few of the best responses.

Greens MSP Ross Greer tweeted: “Don’t want to get anyone too excited but I think we’re going to do this.”

New Panelbase poll for @BizforScotland:

Yes: 55%
No: 45%

Don’t want to get anyone too excited but I think we’re going to do this 😁https://t.co/dUgSzyZd4M

— Ross Greer (@Ross_Greer)

SNP MP Stewart McDonald hailed the “stunning poll”.

Another stunning poll on Scottish independence.

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🇪🇺55%
🇬🇧🤷🏻‍♂️45% https://t.co/QxoxxKOBnT

— Stewart McDonald MP (@StewartMcDonald)

Michael Gray, part of The Skotia team, said independence “is becoming the settled will of the Scottish people”.

Independence is becoming the settled will of the Scottish people, uniting supporters of all parties & none. A referendum will be won with over 60% support & provide a basis for building a more democratic & equal country. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

— Michael Gray (@GrayInGlasgow)

Moray MSP Richard Lochhead and Na h-Eileanan an Iar MP Angus MacNeil thanked Boris Johnson for his help in driving up support.

Here’s hoping Boris Johnson has regular visits to Scotland in his diary. https://t.co/h2xj5pAT2D

— Richard Lochhead (@RichardLochhead)

👍Boris visit has upped support for independence to 55%!!!
With the Hard Brexit coming, independence will rise to the 59%, as polls showed it would 19months ago 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿https://t.co/P8hCOO1U4K

— Angus B MacNeil MP (@AngusMacNeilSNP)

Brexit whistleblower Shahmir Sanni voiced his support for the Yes movement.

Say YES to Scotland. 🤎 https://t.co/Mzwbhpt8n8

— Shahmir Sanni (@shahmiruk)

SNP depute leader Keith Brown said the poll result reflected the feedback he had received from people across Scotland.

More encouraging news for Independence supporters, with Panelbase showing support at 55%. This is borne out by feedback to me from many (Zoom) meetings with Members across the country. Our diversity is our strength, and our unity of purpose will make sure we win.

— Keith Brown MSP (@KeithBrownSNP)

Jonathon Shafi, co-founder of the Radical Independence Campaign, also gave the credit to the Prime Minister.

6 years on, the current polling has flipped the referendum result of 2014. 55% now favour Scottish independence. Fuelled in large part by Johnson and his cabinet of crooks and reprobates it is time to make the break. Get independence done.

— Jonathon Shafi (@Jonathon_Shafi)

Glasgow East MP David Linden added: “And people wonder why the Cabinet Office won’t publish its own private polling on Scottish independence…”

And people wonder why the Cabinet Office won’t publish its own private polling on Scottish independence… https://t.co/PVrKVmgoUE

— David Linden MP (@DavidLinden)

LBC radio host James O’Brien summed up the reaction south of the Border…

Oof. https://t.co/PxuPLU8CaH

— James O’Brien (@mrjamesob)

The former LibDem candidate for London mayor, Siobhan Benita, also expressed her support for Scottish independence.

If I were Scottish I’d vote yes at this stage.
London independence from this shambles of a Brexit Britain wouldn’t be bad either. https://t.co/wmxdRt5mWE

— Siobhan Benita (@SiobhanBenita)

Related posts

Facebook flags Bruce Springsteen pro-Biden ‘The Rising’ video for ‘false information’

Facebook flags Bruce Springsteen pro-Biden ‘The Rising’ video for ‘false information’

Chris Jordan
Asbury Park Press
Published 12:54 AM EDT Aug 19, 2020

Oops. 

Facebook flagged Bruce Springsteen for spreading “false information” on Tuesday, Aug. 18, but FB says it was all a mistake.  

The Democratic National Convention video of the Bruce Springsteen song “The Rising,” in which Springsteen and wife Patti Scialfa make an appearance, was removed from Springsteen’s verified Facebook page at approximately 9:30 p.m. EST, Tuesday, Aug. 18.

“Facebook found this post repeats information about COVID-19 that multiple independent fact-checkers say is false,” read an explanation superimposed over a faded image of the video.

Bruce Springsteen’s Facebook page

About two and a half hours later, the label was removed and the video was viewable.

“The label was applied by mistake and was quickly removed once we became aware of the issue,” said Facebook’s spokesperson Katie Derkits to the USA Today Network New Jersey via email.    

The video features Springsteen’s 2002 song “The Rising” framed as a message of resiliency against the Donald Trump presidency. Scenes of a COVID-19 ravaged  America, including an empty subway and football stadium, are shown as “The Rising” begins. That’s contrasted with the march of neo-Nazis with torches in Charlottesville, Virginia and Trump throwing paper towels to hurricane victims in Puerto Rico.

After that, first responders, George Floyd protesters, Black Lives Matter sign makers, mask wearers and more who are dedicated to the Rising  are shown.

More: Bruce Springsteen ‘The Rising’ video takes on Donald Trump at Democratic Convention

More: Why the concept of time is different for Bruce Springsteen than it is for you and me

A Facebook “Science Feedback” explanation of the video removal, accessible by a click on the label, said that “SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus that arose naturally; no patent exists for SARS-CoV-2; no COVID-19 vaccine exists yet.”

Reps from the Democratic National Convention and Springsteen did not reply to a request for comment by press time. 

Alberto Engeli of Asbury Park attempted to share “The Rising” video on Facebook on Tuesday night and was blocked.

“I don’t understand why, I could only imagine the fact checkers are from multiple organizations and they’re Republican,” said Engeli via email before the video was restored. “I don’t see any relation with Sars-CoV 2 or that (the video) is spreading bogus coronavirus conspiracy theories.”

While it was down on Springsteen’s Facebook page, the video was viewable on Instagram, including Springsteen’s verified page, on YouTube and on Twitter, including Springsteen’s verified page there, where he shared Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s tweet featuring the “Rising” video.

Chris Jordan, a Jersey Shore native, covers entertainment and features for the USA Today Network New Jersey. Contact him at @chrisfhjordan; cjordan@app.com.  

Related posts

Christopher Nolan’s new film ‘Tenet’: release date, plot details, cast and everything we know so far

person

Christopher Nolan had described Tenet, the follow-up to his 2017 war epic Dunkirk, as an “event film” – which seems to be a fitting description for every one of his mind-bending sci-fi thrillers to date.

From Interstellar and Inception to the Dark Knight trilogy, bigger is always better and Nolan rarely fails to deliver unparalleled thrills. But he’s a cryptic filmmaker, keeping as many details as possible under wraps until the very last moment.

Ahead of the upcoming release, we’ve gathered all released information about what’s set to be the most gripping release of the summer.

Tenet release date: when is the film in cinemas?

Tenet will premiere in cinemas in over 70 countries across the world on August 26 after being pushed back multiple times from its initial release date of 17 July, due to the ongoing crisis.

A limited US release will then follow on September 2, expanding into more cinemas across the States as they reopen after the pandemic.

The film will reportedly be debuting in IMAX format. The prologue started playing ahead of selected The Rise of Skywalker screenings in December 2019.

This year’s biggest films were shot with #IMAX cameras. Which ones are you most excited to experience in IMAX theatres? pic.twitter.com/viLifgt5RP

— IMAX (@IMAX) February 5, 2020

The film has also been confirmed to be rated 12A in the UK by the BBFC (British Board of Film Classification). It was originally advised to be a 15, but the rating was lowered after “making small changes to one scene to remove shots of a man kicking a woman”.

Tenet trailer: is there a trailer yet?

There is! The second trailer for Nolan’s latest has arrived after premiering on Fortnite, and it confirms that we’re in for one hell of a trip.

Although remaining relatively vague, it confirms that John David Washington is a secret agent tasked with stopping World War Three. Still, it looks set to be Nolan’s most mysterious project since Inception – packed with twists and turns.

Check out the new trailer below.

It follows the first trailer which was released online in December 2019, after playing exclusively in cinemas ahead of Fast & Furious spin-off Hobbs & Shaw.

Tenet cast: who is in it?

Nolan reunites with a couple of longtime collaborators on Tenet, including Michael Caine (The Dark Knight) and Kenneth Branagh (Dunkirk).

Tenet
Robert Pattinson and John David Washington in Tenet. Credit: Warner Bros.

But it’s also a showcase of new faces for the director – John David Washington () leads the film, and is joined by Robert Pattinson (styled with Nolan’s very own signature haircut), Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Debicki, Clémence Poesy, Himesh Patel (Yesterday), and Dimple Kapadia.

Tenet plot: what is the new film about?

As ever, specifics are being withheld – but the film follows a secret agent (Washington’s character, still unnamed) tasked with preventing World War III. The extra twist, making it recognisably Nolan, is that it focuses on something called “time inversion”.

An official synopsis confirms: “John David Washington is the new protagonist in Christopher Nolan’s original sci-fi action spectacle Tenet. Armed with only one word – Tenet – and fighting for the survival of the entire world, the Protagonist journeys through a twilight world of international espionage on a mission that will unfold in something beyond real time. Not time travel. Inversion.”

Christopher Nolan Tenet John David Washington
John David Washington in ‘Tenet’. Credit: Warner Bros

A clue to the central narrative of the film may lie in history. The Sator Square (or Rotas Square) is a word square containing a five-word Latin palindrome. It contains five words (the central word being “Tenet”) made up of 25 letters and reads exactly the same forwards as it does backwards. It can be found across Europe, and has been located on different buildings, walls and urban dwellings as early as 79AD. The most famous version is in Oppede, France. One likely translation of the Square is “The farmer Arepo has [as] works wheels [a plough]”.

Sator Square
The Sator Square at Oppède, France. Credit Getty

No, you’re right, that doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. But the symmetrical nature of the square could hint at the time-travel structure of Nolan’s new movie. Could, perhaps, the film revolve around a single point in time, or even feature a narrative that repeats itself backwards in the second half of the story?

Washington teased new plot details in an interview with Total Film. “It’s obviously genre-bending,” the actor said. “It’s its own genre: it’s the Nolan genre.”

Pattinson added, “There’s a point where you’re like, it’s kind of cool, and it becomes so insane that it’s almost frightening.

“I sound like such a moron talking about this stuff. Because on top of the, uh – how would I even say this? Quite advanced theoretical physics; I think I’m allowed to say that – it’s just got a billion different ways to read it.”

He adds: “It’s so complicated; if it wasn’t Chris Nolan doing it, you’d be like, ‘This is an impossible movie.’”

, Washington revealed that Tenet and Inception are “related” in some way, confirming long-held rumours that the films are connected.

One thing’s for certain though, even if the plot remains somewhat under wraps – Tenet has a runtime of 149 minutes and 59 seconds. This makes the film one of Nolan’s shortest, 20 minutes shorter than Interstellar, and just one minute longer than Inception.

Where was Tenet filmed?

Rarely one for minimalism, Nolan took his team around the world to shoot the film in seven countries – Denmark, Estonia, India, Italy, Norway, the UK and the US. With a budget of $205 million, making this his second most expensive film after The Dark Knight Rises. No expenses were spared, it seems…

Christopher Nolan Tenet John David Washington Elizabeth Debicki
Elizabeth Debicki and John David Washington in Tenet. Credit: Warner Bros.

The post Christopher Nolan’s new film ‘Tenet’: release date, plot details, cast and everything we know so far appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM.

Related posts

Nigeria News |Ganduje emerges ‘Best Performing Gov’ in fight against COVID19|Latest Political Update

person

An African group of professionals called African Professionals Renaissance Network, (APREN), based in Dakar, Senegal, has selected Kano State Governor, Abdullahi Umar Ganduje as the Best Performing ….
Find out about this report
►https://www.nigerianbulletin.com/threads/ganduje-emerges-%E2%80%98best-performing-gov%E2%80%99-in-fight-against-covid-19-in-nigeria-tvc-news.430544/

………………………………………………………………………………………………..
For Top Links to today’s latest news and updates Please Visit
► https://www.nigerianbulletin.com”
———————————————————————————————————————————–

Security operatives disrupt #RevolutionNow protest, arrest 60 in Abuja – The Cable
►https://www.nigerianbulletin.com/threads/security-operatives-disrupt-revolutionnow-protest-arrest-60-in-abuja-the-cable.430564/

RevolutionNow: Security Officials Shave Off Protester’s Hair With Broken Bottles – Sahara Reporters
►https://www.nigerianbulletin.com/threads/revolutionnow-security-officials-shave-off-protesters-hair-with-broken-bottles-sahara-reporters.430571/

Governor Wike: NDDC spent N10 billion to fight me during 2019 election – TODAY News
►https://www.nigerianbulletin.com/threads/governor-wike-nddc-spent-n10-billion-to-fight-me-during-2019-election-%E2%80%93-today-news.430493/

Edo Assembly impeaches deputy speaker, Idiaye – Punch Newspaper
►https://www.nigerianbulletin.com/threads/edo-assembly-impeaches-deputy-speaker-idiaye-punch-newspaper.430568/

#ganduje #naijanews #NigerianNews#nigerianbulletin
—————————————————————————————————————————————–
Stay With Us on Social Media:
� Website: https://www.nigerianbulletin.com
� Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nigerianbull…
� Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/nbnews247
� Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nigerianbul…
� Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/thenigerianbulletin
—————————————————————————————————————————————–
I hope you guys enjoy this!
� If you enjoy this video, please like it and share it.
� Don’t forget to subscribe to this channel for more updates.
� Subscribe now: https://goo.gl/vgrv1i

This content was originally published here.

Related posts