In the ground and off the page: why we’re banning ads from fossil fuels extractors | Membership | The Guardian

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In a bid to reduce our carbon footprint, confront greenwashing and increase our focus on the climate crisis, the Guardian this week announced it will no longer run ads from fossil fuel extractors alongside any of its content in print or online. The move will come into immediate effect, and follows the announcement in October last year that we intend to reduce our net emissions to zero by 2030.

Once upon a time, a newspaper was a rather straightforward business. You generated enough material of interest to attract a significant number of readers. You then ‘sold’ those readers to advertisers happy to pay to get their ideas, products or brands in front of consumers with cash to spend.

Of course, digital disruption over the past 20 years has upended that model, but advertising remains an important part of the media business ecosystem. At the Guardian, it is still responsible for about two-fifths of our income.

But what happens when the readers don’t like the adverts? What do you do when the message that advertisers want to spread jars awkwardly with the work your journalists are doing?

What if your journalists are some of the best in the world at revealing and investigating the deepening climate catastrophe and the disaster that is fossil fuel growth, while some of your advertisers are the very people digging the stuff out of the ground?

This contradiction has bothered us – and some of you – for some time. We came up with a rather bold answer this week: turn away the money and double down on the journalism.

“It’s something we thought about for a long time,” says Anna Bateson, the interim chief executive officer of Guardian Media Group, the Guardian’s parent company. “We always felt it was in line with our editorial values but were cautious for commercial reasons.”

She said it was the logical next step after the Guardian committed last year to becoming carbon neutral by 2030 and was certified as a B Corp – a company that puts purpose before profit. But she added that the move had to be weighed carefully, given the fact that the Guardian only recently returned to breakeven after years in the red.

“You have to be careful you are not making cavalier decisions,” she said. “ We are still having to fight for our financial future. But because of the support we get from our readers, it is less of a risk.”

On the advertising side of our business, Adam Foley said there were no complaints at all that potential customers were suddenly off-limits, adding that staff felt that “being part of a company that shares their values” was the biggest motivation for his teams.

“A statement like this reaffirms to all of us that we’re contributing to a business that really lives those values – to the extent where it is prepared to sacrifice profit for purpose.”

The response from the wider world has been a pleasant surprise. Hundreds of you have written in, pledging your support, and in some cases, one-off contributions to start making up the shortfall. (EDS: See below – I’m going to append the best responses below. In print you can use as the panel)

The environmental movement was instantly appreciative, with activists quickly urging our peers to follow suit. “The Guardian will no longer accept advertising from oil and gas companies,” Greta Thunberg tweeted. “A good start, who will take this further?” Greenpeace called it “a huge moment in the battle against oil and gas for all of us.”

Some readers have been calling for the Guardian to go the whole hog and forsake advertising from any company with a substantial carbon footprint. Bateson said that was not realistic, adding that such a move would result in less money for journalism. She said the fossil fuel extractors were specifically targeted because of their efforts to skew the climate change debate through their lobbying effort.

“We are committed to advertising,” she said. “It will continue to be part of our future. We want advertisers who want to be appear alongside our high quality journalism.”

And how will we know if this has worked?
“We will listen to our readers, we will listen to our advertisers. The response so far has been gratifying. If we continue to hear positive noises from our readers and supporters, then it will have been a success.”




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Responses from our supporters

That is such a brilliant decision and it will be tough, but it is the correct one and I am very proud of The Guardian. Barbara Syer

Following the Guardian’s decision to ban ads from fossil fuel companies I’m making a monthly contribution to support its fearless journalism: reader support is essential for independent scrutiny of the powerful in business, finance and politics. Titus Alexander, Hertfordshire, England

I live at present in Canada, home to the Alberta Tar Sands: another name for ecological devastation resulting from fossil fuel extraction. I fully support The Guardian’s action in ceasing to be a vehicle for advertising by fossil fuel extractive companies, and I’m proud to be a supporter. My monthly donation is small, but when I can I will make it much greater. Rosemary Delnavine, Canada

Congratulations. At this time it may be a bold step, indeed, within this industry, but true leaders have to take bold steps for the betterment of the quality of life, and more importantly for the life of future generations. I applaud this decision, and will spread the word. Raphael Sulkovitz, Boston MA

What a bravery! This is what the life on earth needs, thank you. Karri Kuikka, Finland (EDS: please leave her wonderful Finglish intact!)

Keep it up. Here in Canada, we’re still trying to have it both ways — sell the product internationally but discourage buying domestically. As I recall, it was the same with tobacco. Eventually, it took a change in public opinion to solve the problem. As a news source, your efforts are part of this solution. Robert Shotton, Ottawa

I applaud your decision to”walk the talk.” I will therefore continue to contribute to The Guardian. Bob Wagenseil

Bravo yr decision to eschew $ from the FFI. Please do continue to hold to the fire(s) the feet of the deniers and the willfully ignorant. Sydney Alonso, Vermont, US

I am very happy to hear that good news. It’s quite courageous on your part, and I’m happy to support you! Have a great year ahead, you’ll have my continuous support! Julien Psomas

I completely support your plan to refuse ads from fossils, despite the
financial hit to the Guardian. I have made a donation to help out. David Thompson

A very commendable decision, very much in keeping with the Guardian’s position as leader of green issues to leave a better planet for following generations. Richard Vernon, Oxford

Yay! I’m so proud of the Guardian! We can no longer support or fund in any manner the fossil fuel industry if we have any chance of survival as a civilization on this planet. You’ve taken a courageous and moral step that will hopefully embolden others to join you. Good on you! Best, Carol Ross, Missouri, US

Good decision. I’ll support you as much as I can, which unfortunately is not much as I live on age pension only. Keep up the good work, we need it desperately! Ursula Brandt, South Australia

I am absolutely delighted by this decision. So many people pledge to do something about Climate Change, but few actually are willing to get uncomfortable and DO it. I am very proud of you as my favourite source of Information and this only makes a case for me to donate next time to you again. Christiane Gross

It was great reading what The Guardian is doing re the climate. As a Guardian on-line reader from The Netherlands I’m going to contribute monthly now instead of ‘now and again’. The amount will be relatively small as I do not have a great income. I really hope more of your supporters will do so, because it is really great what you are doing.
With kind regards, Aleida Oostendorp, Netherlands

I congratulate you and your team on taking this step regarding fossil fuel companies. The Guardian’s stance on the environment and its excellent coverage of related stories and events is the major reason for my support. Well done, and good luck in the future. Deirdre Moore

Love your new policy about accepting money from fossil fuels. Will contribute more to help make up for the shortfall. Todd Misk

I live on a fixed income with a strict budget so my continuing support of your excellent news organisation represents my commitment to the fight to address climate change. Every step counts. Barbara Hirsch, Texas, US

Only when we speak truth to power can change take place. thank yo for your courageous and expensive decision. Nancy Shepherd, Vermont, US

Love your journalism, especially your investigative work and the climate change topic. And with the bold statement about not receiving any more sponsorship from the fossil extracting companies? Well, the already great newspapers became even more impressive now. Keep up the good work. Miroslav Řezníček, Czech Republic

Thank you for taking the bold step of refusing advertising from fossil fuel extractive companies. I think it is the right thing to do & hope many more companies do the same. We must all work together if we want to save our planet. It is one of the most important issues of our times. Ginger Comstock, New York, US

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Nollywood Actor Mike Ezuruonye Ungergoes Surgery Following Strange Growth Spurt In His Eye

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Nollywood actor Mike Ezuruonye has revealed he recently underwent surgery on his eye.

Mike says he spent eight hours in surgery following a strange growth spurt around his eye.

The fair-skinned actor made this known via a post on his Instagram page on Friday, January 24, 2020, where he shared a photo of himself on the operation table and thanked God for the successful surgery. Mike then opened up about the cause of the growth.

According to him, the mass in his eye formed as a result of the overbearing amount of harsh light rays his eyes were exposed to in the years he spent shooting movies. The movie star also said he was scared of going under the knife.

He wrote:

“Forgive being Reluctant but just had to share…Many don’t know what we go through in the course of our work (FILM MAKING). Had a growth encroaching the pupil of both eyes cos of overexposure to HARSH movie Production LIGHTS over the Years…(Heard looking into your PHONE/COMPUTER for too long also puts one in Danger)…Advised to get Surgery done, I was Scared.”

We wish him speedy recovery. 

See his post below:

View this post on Instagram

Forgive being Reluctant but just had to share..Many don’t know what we go through in the course of our work (FILM MAKING)..Had a growth encroaching the pupil of both eyes cos of over exposure to HARSH movie Production LIGHTS over the Years…(Heard looking into your PHONE/COMPUTER for too long also puts one in Danger)..Advised to get Surgery done,I was Scared…After Surgery, for over 8 hrs ,i was without sight as my eyes were Demanded Tightly Closed,Tightly Shut by the Ophthalmologist Team of Doctors..Hmnnn..These Made me Appreciate more the GIFT of Sight GOD gave me…Goshhhh that I can never ever take for Granted..Scary experience…But GOD is always Faithful..Glad Surgery was SUCCESSFUL and i will be back real soon to my work and Passion…Thanks to my FANS and TRUE SUPPORTERS..(NOTE Pls :Dont adhere to any IMPOSTOR who would want to take advantage to defraud anyone of his or her money…Pls I am Fine and Healing) I love you all always..God Bless

A post shared by Mike Ezuruonye (@mikeezu) on

Photo Credit: Instagram

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‘His killers must be brought to book’– outrage as police ‘torture’ mechanic to death

'His killers must be brought to book'-- outrage as police 'torture' mechanic to death

The alleged killing of Chima Ikwunado, a mechanic in Port Harcourt, Rivers, by some officers of the Nigerian police force in the state, has sparked outrage on social media platforms.

Comrade Phils, an activist, had taken to his Facebook page to disclose that the brother and a client of the deceased narrated to him how men attached to the E Crack, Mile 1 police station, carried out the act.

According to him, the client disclosed that he gave his car to the deceased to fix its air-conditioning system on December 19, 2019.

The next day, he tried reaching Chima, the deceased, via phone but he was unreachable. He then decided to visit the mechanic shop and still couldn’t find Chima and his car. Upon further inquiry from other mechanics at the shop, it was discovered that the deceased was apprehended by the police.

He said the client subsequently visited different police stations till he got to the Mile 1 police station and saw his car parked outside the Eagle Crack division.

The client said upon identifying himself as the car owner, he had a gun pointed at him and was chased out of the station. For fear of being shot at, he left as instructed.

As he went home to restrategise on how to tackle the issue, he said he was visited by Obinna, a brother to the deceased, who explained that Chima and some other colleagues were testing two cars, his and a Toyota Camry, after repairs.

Due to the terrible traffic at the time they decided to drive through a one-way route where they were apprehended by the police.

Obinna said that the policemen asked for bribes but were not satisfied with the amount offered by Chima and his colleagues and immediately accused them of stealing the two cars.

The police allegedly took the cash on them, a total of N150,000, handcuffed them and took them to the police station where they were subjected to “brutal torture”.

One of the arrested suspects, who couldn’t bear the torture anymore, confessed to them breaking into a lady’s home and stealing the cars.

With the knowledge of the reason behind the arrest, Chima’s client proceeds to claim his car. Accompanied by an Airforce commander, he takes copies of the original car documents to the station.

After much back and forth, the car was eventually released to him but Chima and his colleagues remained in the custody of the police.

On January 2, the client disclosed he received a call from a barrister who was defending Chima’s colleagues.

It was during this conversation, it was discovered Chima had died from the torture and his colleagues had been sent to prison with decaying sores from wounds inflicted on them during torture.

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The heart-wrenching tale has since sparked outrage on Twitter as users have united with the hashtag #JusticeForChima to register their annoyance.
“Chima POLICE killers MUST be brought to book,” a Twitter user demanded.
“To start with, The IG of @PoliceNG should resign for how horrible the Force has become under him.
I hope by now, those police officers that killed Chima are already in detention. They should be charged for Murder.
Apparently, the Police can’t be reformed. #JusticeForChima,” another user said.
Here’s what some Nigerians had to say:
Chima deserves justice
Chima was a son
Chima was a brother
Chima was a husband
Chima was an expectant father
Chima was an employer of labor
Cha was an innocent citizen
Chima deserves justice
What happened to Chima can happen to anybody #JusticeForChima

— saggibabe (@iiamfloxycutey) 17 January 2020

Almost every family in Nigeria has a relative who is a police officer. Either nuclear or extended family. Pls let us start talking sense into their skulls. Ask them this question “what if I’m d one?” This wickedness mixed wit madness must stop #EndPoliceBrutality #JusticeForChima

— Iyalaya (@Lollylarry1) 17 January 2020

To start with, The IG of @PoliceNG should resign for how horrible the Force has become under him.

I hope by now, those police officers that killed Chima are already in detention. They should be charged for Murder.

Apparently, the Police can’t be reformed.#JusticeForChima

— Mr Integrity (@Intergrity56) 17 January 2020

The police is our friend I’ve never understood that statement and I’m not sure if I ever will. U think that holding a gun to ur hand makes u a God, constantly disregarding the lives of civilians news flash #JusticeForChima pic.twitter.com/R8lkqVulaj

— Dat stubborn girl😁💦💦❣️✍️ (@Jojo101Stan) 17 January 2020

I woke up to the sad news of the murder of one Chima In Portharcourt by men of @PoliceNG. We’re gradually getting to the point where citizens will take laws into their hands & challenge the madness of the @PoliceNG. The State CP must account for the life of Chima #JusticeForChima

— Olúyẹmí Fásípè 🇳🇬 (@YemieFash) 17 January 2020

This country is so messed up. To imagine our law enforcement agencies are the ones doing the work of Armed Robbers and Hired killer. The governments are definitely sleeping. #JusticeForChima

— The Olanrewaju♠️ (@tobiloba_II) 17 January 2020

The Nigerian Police is the most corrupt, insensitive & reckless public institution in the world.

An institution that is supposed to protect our lives, is the same institution that indiscriminately murders our own people.

Such an alarming contradiction!#JusticeForChima
😢

— The King🖋 (@Kingsleymaximo) 17 January 2020

I always say this, if u ever hear I’m running for the office of d president or my husband is, I advice the Nigerian police force to ensure we dont win cos if we do, I will be coming for them all. I will even visit the sins of the fathers on d newer generations#JusticeForChima 😭 pic.twitter.com/E8T4OZYYJF

— Kate-Nnaji (@nnaji_kate) 17 January 2020

Somebody once said that the armed robber is far better than the @NigeriaPolice, it was fun to me but i later got into deep thought about it and saw some sense in it. Reading the story on #JusticeForChima makes me weep bitterly for my beloved country.😭😭

— Akin joshua a🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬 (@Akinjoshua2017) 17 January 2020

The law is clear, it’s better to let a 100 criminal abscond than to convict one innocent person, the number of innocent persons the @PoliceNG has ruined their lives is unimaginable, innocent lives in prison and dead as a result of activities from rogue officers! #JusticeForChima https://t.co/9ylyPg6qzD

— jgagas🗨 PhD (affidavit) (@JGagariga) 17 January 2020

Nigeria is a failed state. The lives of common citizens can be wasted for no reason by the police.

I would have been dead like chima, or in prison like the other 4 boys 10 years ago from the hands of Area F police station in Lagos.

God is watching. #JusticeForChima https://t.co/8ws2otKaQy

— Truthfully (@Truthfully83) 17 January 2020

Because you’re police officer
Because you need money
Because you holds a gun
You guys beleive you’re a god
You guys have failed the citizens
The Nigeria government as been failing since 1960 and they are still failing till date!!! Back to back #JusticeForChima

— shellykeen (@Ade_kelvin94) 17 January 2020

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Looking Back Through a Misty Film: Recollection from the 2019 Purple Hibiscus Creative Writing Workshop

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by Bura-Bari Nwilo

In December 2019, I stood over Oly in my apartment in Nsukka and drew her attention to posts of Facebook friends who had screenshot acceptance letters signed by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie for the year’s creative writing workshop. And in my eyes, she could see mild fury hinged on disappointment. I deafened her with tales of my yearly rejections and why I felt I had a right to be disappointed with all things Nigerian.

Then by whatever stroke of fate it was, I checked my email and saw my own letter. Like a letter I had once received explaining how I was among a shortlist of 50 amazing writers and the apology for what could not become my invitation letter, I read those years of rejection and apology into what was an acceptance letter for 2019. When I read through to the second paragraph, I felt an inch taller and almost swiftly, I was massively subdued, like I stood on a tower of resentment for all that had been my misfortune and it turned out it was a day of glory.

When I read through to the second paragraph, I felt an inch taller and almost swiftly, I was massively subdued, like I stood on a tower of resentment for all that had been my misfortune and it turned out it was a day of glory.

Oly shared kind words with me and I went back to the email to see if I had not been too optimistic to have read into a poor letter an acceptance that was only in my imaginations. And I was not dreaming. I was truly invited to the now renamed Purple Hibiscus Creative Writing Workshop after more than five rejections.

At the workshop, I shared experiences of my years of application and some of the wild thoughts I had nurtured. Once, I had thought that my serial rejection, after many of my friends were invited, was because I was not Igbo and I thought I could change my name to allow me entrance. Don’t die yet. And for the year I received a consolidation email signed by Ms. Adichie, I could not mix anger with such obviously patronizing letter. Goodwill messages from Facebook friends, of how I was such an interesting writer, added in me some courage to keep writing. And looking back at such thoughts, I am grateful it ended up between Arinze and me.

And for the big question in class, I asked Ms. Adichie what interested her in my entry that did not meet her many years ago, especially since it was just a regular story, something I had not even taken seriously, against the many I had written with all hopes and concern. And there, I concluded that maybe what makes the big mark comes in the funniest wrap. I had written a story about a serial killer who lured her victims, especially taxi drivers. The killer writes about the incidents on her blog. The few paragraphs I sent were the reason I was invited.

And there, I concluded that maybe what makes the big mark comes in the funniest wrap.

I come from a place of ‘serious’ literature. And I have tried creating most of that seriousness. I have given elbowroom to experimentation and maybe it is why I am yet to decide on writing a novel. And after listening to other participants share their acceptance tales; I knew that I was not alone. We were a universe of people motivated by Chimamanda and would do as much as applying for several years just to hear her up-close, watch her read and share thoughts on story writing and being a writer while addressing us by our names and whatever it was that made us stand out.

The 2019 workshop had it a bit unfortunate. The classes were cut to five days instead of ten days and a lot of things had to be stuffed into a really tiny car. Chimamanda, Lola Shoneyin, Eghosa Imasuen, and Novuyo Tsuma Rosa gave us thrilling experiences with backbreaking tasks: reading multiple stories into late night and class writing tasks that would see you read aloud your writings and listen to others and give constructive feedback. We made a coolly glossy family in a few days than would have been imagined. And maybe the shared rooms enabled bonding, but the 2019 workshop was tense, practical, overwhelming, indulging, compelling and it ended on such evenings where writers knew tears like they knew words and sentences. And those whose tears did not make the warm walk through cheeks, it formed a bubble in their hearts and stayed there as a priceless memory.

Her brilliance lies more in her ability to share quite controversial yet informed thoughts without breaking anyone’s back.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is brilliant and adorable in giving kind words. We share a birth date with a ten-year age difference and that’s my consolidation for being a lazy writer. Her brilliance lies more in her ability to share quite controversial yet informed thoughts without breaking anyone’s back. Her playfulness and humane jibes and photo sessions informed me that it takes more than a fine head and great skill to be a superstar. A sprinkle of warmth, friendliness and sometimes vanity could be other awesome additions.

With the workshop, Chimamanda builds confidence, encourages collaboration, and invents homes for broken yet agile storytellers whose shortcomings are not only placed outside the spotlight, but their strength and wellness are given so much cheers and support to germinate.

Bura-Bari Nwilo is the author of The Colour of a Thing Believed, a book of short stories.

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‘His killers must be brought to book’- outrage as police ‘torture’ mechanic to death – TheCable Lifestyle

person

The alleged killing of Chima Ikwunado, a mechanic in Port Harcourt, Rivers, by some officers of the Nigerian police force in the state, has sparked outrage on social media platforms.

Comrade Phils, an activist, had taken to his Facebook page to disclose that the brother and a client of the deceased narrated to him how men attached to the E Crack, Mile 1 police station, carried out the act.

According to him, the client disclosed that he gave his car to the deceased to fix its air-conditioning system on December 19, 2019.

The next day, he tried reaching Chima, the deceased, via phone but he was unreachable. He then decided to visit the mechanic shop and still couldn’t find Chima and his car. Upon further inquiry from other mechanics at the shop, it was discovered that the deceased was apprehended by the police.

He said the client subsequently visited different police stations till he got to the Mile 1 police station and saw his car parked outside the Eagle Crack division.

The client said upon identifying himself as the car owner, he had a gun pointed at him and was chased out of the station. For fear of being shot at, he left as instructed.

As he went home to restrategise on how to tackle the issue, he said he was visited by Obinna, a brother to the deceased, who explained that Chima and some other colleagues were testing two cars, his and a Toyota Camry, after repairs.

Due to the terrible traffic at the time they decided to drive through a one-way route where they were apprehended by the police.

Obinna said that the policemen asked for bribes but were not satisfied with the amount offered by Chima and his colleagues and immediately accused them of stealing the two cars.

The police allegedly took the cash on them, a total of N150,000, handcuffed them and took them to the police station where they were subjected to “brutal torture”.

One of the arrested suspects, who couldn’t bear the torture anymore, confessed to them breaking into a lady’s home and stealing the cars.

With the knowledge of the reason behind the arrest, Chima’s client proceeds to claim his car. Accompanied by an Airforce commander, he takes copies of the original car documents to the station.

After much back and forth, the car was eventually released to him but Chima and his colleagues remained in the custody of the police.

On January 2, the client disclosed he received a call from a barrister who was defending Chima’s colleagues.

It was during this conversation, it was discovered Chima had died from the torture and his colleagues had been sent to prison with decaying sores from wounds inflicted on them during torture.

The heart-wrenching tale has since sparked outrage on Twitter as users have united with the hashtag #JusticeForChima to register their annoyance.

“Chima POLICE killers MUST be brought to book,” a Twitter user demanded.

“To start with, The IG of @PoliceNG should resign for how horrible the Force has become under him.
I hope by now, those police officers that killed Chima are already in detention. They should be charged for Murder.
Apparently, the Police can’t be reformed. #JusticeForChima,” another user said.

Here’s what some Nigerians had to say:

I woke up to the sad news of the murder of one Chima In Portharcourt by men of @PoliceNG. We’re gradually getting to the point where citizens will take laws into their hands & challenge the madness of the @PoliceNG. The State CP must account for the life of Chima #JusticeForChima

— Olúyẹmí Fásípè 🇳🇬 (@YemieFash) January 17, 2020

Chima POLICE killers MUST be brought to book😠

Chima POLICE killers MUST be brought to book😠

Chima POLICE killers MUST be brought to book😠

Chima POLICE killers MUST be brought to book😠

Chima POLICE killers MUST be brought to book😠#JusticeForChima pic.twitter.com/A2QCFcCxh3

— 🍫 Chinonso Viktor 🍫 (@iamdlaw2) January 17, 2020

Almost every family in Nigeria has a relative who is a police officer. Either nuclear or extended family. Pls let us start talking sense into their skulls. Ask them this question “what if I’m d one?” This wickedness mixed wit madness must stop #EndPoliceBrutality #JusticeForChima

To start with, The IG of @PoliceNG should resign for how horrible the Force has become under him.

I hope by now, those police officers that killed Chima are already in detention. They should be charged for Murder.

Apparently, the Police can’t be reformed.#JusticeForChima

— Mr Integrity (@Intergrity56) January 17, 2020

Because you’re police officer
Because you need money
Because you holds a gun
You guys beleive you’re a god
You guys have failed the citizens
The Nigeria government as been failing since 1960 and they are still failing till date!!! Back to back #JusticeForChima

— shellykeen (@Ade_kelvin94) January 17, 2020

Nigeria is a failed state. The lives of common citizens can be wasted for no reason by the police.

I would have been dead like chima, or in prison like the other 4 boys 10 years ago from the hands of Area F police station in Lagos.

— Truthfully (@Truthfully83) January 17, 2020

Nigerian Police is your number one enemy!!!

I repeat, Nigerian police is your number one enemy!!

Fear them same way you fear armed robbers.

They’re not protecting us anymore, they’re killing us everyday.

Untill FG reforms police, Police is not your friend.#JusticeForChima

— Chukwuma Gordian™ (@chumagordian) January 17, 2020

This is extremely horrible and sad at the same time. Feels like a movie script that no one would ever imagine innocent lives are being treated like this.

Hopefully this won’t end up as one of the regular 24-hours social media noise without justice. #JusticeForChima https://t.co/QEsXPu5xxd

— Wale Adetona (@iSlimfit) January 17, 2020

The police is our friend I’ve never understood that statement and I’m not sure if I ever will. U think that holding a gun to ur hand makes u a God, constantly disregarding the lives of civilians news flash #JusticeForChima pic.twitter.com/R8lkqVulaj

— Dat stubborn girl😁💦💦❣️✍️ (@Jojo101Stan) January 17, 2020

This story is so sad, I feel defeated reading this. How is this even a country? How do we live like this ?
Re the Nigerian police even human ?
Who did this to us? #JusticeForChima pic.twitter.com/g1N0zL6ZKp

Chima deserves justice
Chima was a son
Chima was a brother
Chima was a husband
Chima was an expectant father
Chima was an employer of labor
Cha was an innocent citizen
Chima deserves justice
What happened to Chima can happen to anybody #JusticeForChima

— saggibabe (@iiamfloxycutey) January 17, 2020

When you caution a policeman against torture, they think you’re stoping them from doing their job but in the real sense, you’re actually saving them. How do you explain #JusticeForChima tweets to his parents/loved ones? How do the police culprits explain to their families too?

— M. M. Obono (@martobono) January 17, 2020

My heart bleeds for Nigeria. How did we get here? What happened to our values? Is it too much money or lack of it? No more regard for human lives… now we have to run away from the people who are meant to protect us???

There shall be no peace for the wicked!#JusticeForChima https://t.co/nM3HDzUtw6

— ‘Lekan ‘Feyisan (@Lekan_Feyisan) January 17, 2020

I stay in Port Harcourt & the rate the Police are extorting money from people is ludicrous. They & the bad guys work hand in hand. A thug will collect someone’s phone & wallet right in the Police nose & they’ll just ignore & in the end, they’ll get their shares #JusticeForChima

— 🇳🇬 ™Follow Me | Follow Tacha🔱🔱™ 🇳🇬 (@Mhizta_Daniels) January 17, 2020

The law is clear, it’s better to let a 100 criminal abscond than to convict one innocent person, the number of innocent persons the @PoliceNG has ruined their lives is unimaginable, innocent lives in prison and dead as a result of activities from rogue officers! #JusticeForChima https://t.co/9ylyPg6qzD

— jgagas🗨 PhD (affidavit) (@JGagariga) January 17, 2020

Somebody once said that the armed robber is far better than the @NigeriaPolice, it was fun to me but i later got into deep thought about it and saw some sense in it. Reading the story on #JusticeForChima makes me weep bitterly for my beloved country.😭😭

— Akin joshua a🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬 (@Akinjoshua2017) January 17, 2020

I always say this, if u ever hear I’m running for the office of d president or my husband is, I advice the Nigerian police force to ensure we dont win cos if we do, I will be coming for them all. I will even visit the sins of the fathers on d newer generations#JusticeForChima 😭 pic.twitter.com/E8T4OZYYJF

— Kate-Nnaji (@nnaji_kate) January 17, 2020

Life is hard, Africa is difficult, Nigeria is hell!! Safe return to your home ain’t guaranteed even if you go to the next street. May my children not witness this hardship 🤢. May God give the deceased family the fortitude to bear the loss.#JusticeForChima

— timi (@kvng__timmy) January 17, 2020

The Nigerian Police is the most corrupt, insensitive & reckless public institution in the world.

An institution that is supposed to protect our lives, is the same institution that indiscriminately murders our own people.

Such an alarming contradiction!#JusticeForChima
😢

This country is so messed up. To imagine our law enforcement agencies are the ones doing the work of Armed Robbers and Hired killer. The governments are definitely sleeping. #JusticeForChima

— The Olanrewaju♠️ (@tobiloba_II) January 17, 2020

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Nigerian Youths Should Choose Life, Not Death — Emmanuel Onwubiko

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Statistically, the global authority on health issues known as the World Health Organization (WHO) has released a highly frightening but realistic rate of suicides committed by members of the global humanity per annum. It says that close to 800 000 people die due to suicide every year, which is one person every 40 seconds.

Suicide the World Health Organisation observed succinctly, is a global phenomenon and occurs throughout the lifespan.

It reckons that effective and evidence-based interventions can be implemented at population, sub-population and individual levels to prevent suicide and suicide attempts. There are indications that for each adult who died by suicide there may have been more than 20 others attempting suicide.

Suicide occurs throughout the lifespan and is the second leading cause of death among 15-29-year-olds globally.

Suicide is a global phenomenon; in fact, 79% of suicides occurred in low- and middle-income countries in 2016. Suicide accounted for 1.4% of all deaths worldwide, making it the 18th leading cause of death in 2016, so says the global agency on health matters also known as World Health organization in its website just visited by this writer.

I must state that although the fact remains that suicide is a worldwide trend, but for us in Nigeria just like in other African nations, the death of someone is a huge loss not just to the immediate family but to the society and the nation at large. Given the African set up of the typical family tree, members of a given family belong to both the nuclear and the extended family units. So the matter of suicidal demise of any member brings about phenomenal amount of sorrows to a greater percentage of people in Nigeria.

However, due to a number of factors not unrelated with psychological, emotional, financial and sociological factors, a lot of young Nigerians have fallen into the traps of suicide in the last couple of years particularly in the last one year. Around June of last year, Samuel Elias, 25, a final year student of Department of Religion and Culture, University of Nigeria Nsukka allegedly committed suicide by drinking sniper.

The mother of the deceased, Mrs. Kate Elias a staff of the university, told the News agency of Nigeria that the unfortunate incident happened on Monday June 17, around 5.30pm in her house at Justina Eze Street Nsukka.

Elias said she came back from work on that fateful day and discovered that the mood of her first child was bad and he was staggering when he came to collect a bottle of coke from the fridge

“I followed him immediately to his room and started talking to him but he could not respond and when I looked closely, I discovered that his teeth had tightened up.

“As I looked around, I saw an empty sniper bottle; at this point I raised alarm and my other children rushed to the room and we tried to give him red oil but his tightened teeth did not allow the oil to enter his mouth,” she said.

According to her, he was rushed to the hospital, where he eventually died.

“We immediately rushed him to Faith Foundation Hospital, Nsukka and were later referred to Bishop Shanahan Hospital, Nsukka, where he eventually died.

The mother of seven said her son could have died of depression, noting that he had been lamenting his inability to graduate from UNN because of his final year project, which he has been working on.

“I know two things he usually complained, his inability to graduate from UNN since 2016 because of the project that he has not finished as his classmates have all gone for their National Youth Service Corps.

“Also, how his father’s family in Ihechiowa in Arochukwu Local Government of Abia State abandoned us since their father died.

“Whenever he complained of these things, I usually advised him to trust God, who is capable of solving every problem.

“I do not know why he will go to this extent of committing suicide. I have seven children and he was my first child.

“It is still like a dream to me that my first son and first child has died,” she said in tears.

Reacting to this incident, Prof. Tagbo Ugwu, the Head of Department of Religion and Culture in UNN, said somebody called him and told him about the unfortunate incident.

“I received the news with shock and surprise.

“I will find out from his supervisor what is wrong from the project that has stopped him from graduating,” he said.

When contacted Mr Ebere Amaraizu, the Police Public Relations Office, in Enugu State, confirmed the incident and said police would investigate the circumstances surrounding the death.

“The police is aware of Samuel Elias’ death. He was a final year student of the Department of Religion and Culture in UNN, who committed suicide on Monday by drinking sniper.

“Police will investigate circumstances surrounding the death,” he said.

It would be recalled that barely five weeks after Chukwuemeka Akachi, a 400-level student of Department of English and Literary Studies in UNN ended his own life after taking a bottle of sniper. In August of last year, from the Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), came the story that the school community was thrown into mourning mood following the death of a final year student, Opeyemi Dara. The deceased was said to be a student of Faculty of Arts, Department of English Language, who allegedly committed suicide after taking a suspected dose of lethal substance popularly known as “sniper”. News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) learnt that she allegedly took her life following her poor academic performance, although the details of the incident were still sketchy.

The media stated that the authority of the institution confirmed that the deceased committed suicide following depression occasioned by poor academic records.

Dara’s academic records obtained by a journalist who worked on the story for one of the National dailies indicated that she had five outstanding courses and 12 Special Electives.

Also the Public Relations Officer of OAU, Mr Abiodun Olanrewaju confirmed the incident and promised that the institution would investigate and make its findings public. Olarewaju appealed to students not to contemplate committing suicide because of poor academic performance.

“We sympathize with the parents and guardian of the deceased known as Dara.” We just want our students and young ones to know that depression is not a thing they should encourage, no matter the situation or circumstance they find themselves. “ Some people in the past have passed through the same situation and circumstances and came out clean. “Now, suicide can never be an option and people, especially the young ones who believe that taking their own lives is an act of gallantry should know that it is not. “We want to appeal to students, particularly OAU students to take things easy. Any child that fails; that is why the university says you can rerun a course, you can resit a course.

“People out there also face challenges and when you are in school, failure or repetition of a course or particular subject is also part of the challenges students must face. “The university will get to the root of the incident and get back to the public,” Olarewaju said. Just before this case, there was another story from Edo state.

That was precisely at the Faculty of Arts, University of Benin, UNIBEN, main campus came the heartbreaking story that a final-year student jumped from the second floor of one of the hostels and died.

The deceased male student, whose identity is still unknown as at press time, committed suicide after failing his examinations, which made him suffer depression for failure to graduate. The next case is that of a girl that reportedly took her life following a break up of a relationship and this also happened at the University of Benin like the aforementioned the deceased was a three hundred level student.

The corpse of Miss Christabell Omoremime Buoro, aged 21, a 300-level student of the department of Medical Laboratory Science, University of Benin (UNIBEN), was discovered in her hostel flat at Plot 4 Uwaifo lane, Newton street, Ekosodin area, behind the university fence, so reports the newspapers. Miss Christabell reportedly was discovered after she allegedly took some deadly substance to end her life. It was gathered that the undergraduate linked her suicide to her breakup with her boyfriend.

The media states that an empty sachet of Klin detergent was found in the spot where she took her life.

According to the source of the media information, “A small girl of that age will take her life all because of one boy. The policemen that came to evacuate the body were very angry after reading out loud the note she dropped.

“Thank God that she even dropped a note, if not the roommates would have been in hot soup, because investigation would have began from that point.”

As are with all cases of suicide, the police officers in this case situated at the Ugbowo police station have invited two person for questioning over the content of the letter.

It was rumoured that the deceased Christabel mixed the deadly insecticide, popularly called Sniper with Sprite drink, and reportedly left a suicide note where she stated that she was about taking her life because the guy she loved didn’t love her in return after her boyfriend broke up with her.

Sadly, the year 2020 has also seen another case of suicide by a youngster and in this developing story we were told that the girl stated that she was depressed and that she no longer find life attractive.

The Enugu State Police Command only at the weekend confirmed that a serving National Youth Service Corp member in Enugu State, Miss Bolufemi Princess Motunrayo, has committed suicide.

It was gathered that Miss Motunrayo, a Batch ‘C’ corps member serving in Girls Secondary School, Ibagwa-Aka, Igbo-Eze South Local Government Area of Enugu State took her life on Friday, January 10, 2020, when she allegedly drank a substance suspected to be sniper.

The Corp member hailed from Ijumu Local Government Area of Kogi State and a graduate of Banking and Finance from Prince Abubakar Audu University formally called Kogi State University was reported to have taken two bottles of snipers.

One of the media reporters who worked on this emerging story said it was learnt that she had before committing suicide dropped a short note that read, “I did this because I see nothing worth living for in this world”.

Confirming the alleged suicide is the State Police Public Relations Officer, Ebere Amaraizu, who described the incident as unfortunate.

Amaraizu, a Superintendent of Police in a text message to the Punch newspaper correspondent said, “The incident has to do with the taking of sniper insecticide by one Bolufemi Moturayo Yetunde, a female corper from Kogi State but, doing her service with Girls High School, Ibeagwa-Aka, Igboeze South L.G.A on 10/1/2020.

“She was later rushed to the hospital where the doctor confirmed her dead,” he said.

In the version written by The Guardian, one of the friends of this absolutely beautiful graduate and a serving member of the National Youth Service scheme (NYSC) raised alarm that there is need for a thorough investigation of what triggered the ‘suicide’ because in the thinking of this person, the girl who killed herslf allegedly was having a swell time and was not known to have any case of depression or loneliness.

From all these and many other stories of suicide and suspected suicides especially the cases of suicide by Students, there is a glaring evidence of a lacuna fundamentally in the administration of these tertiary institutions. These cases of students killing themselves due to frustrations attendant with their inability to successfully graduate could be tackled if these schools can set up functional mechanisms for looking into all cases related to inability or otherwise of their students to graduate. There has to be a system in place to seamlessly monitor and ensure that the process of writing and supervision of projects of students are transparent and open to such an extent that no single person should become the last hope of any strident from graduation. The schools should have a reporting mechanisms whereby cases relating to inability to pass these projects and graduate are looked into by dedicated members of staff who should play the role of arbitrators for the students. The school system in Nigeria is too commercially oriented to an extent that Students are put under intense pressure to raise money from all means possible to bribe lecturers marking their papers to enable them graduate and most of these students who can’t raise money to pay their ways are left with no option than to be sexually abused by some professionally incompetent lecturers. The University and tertiary institutions must be made to put on a human and humane face even as there has to be a system in place to give access to students to step up and dialogue with dedicated teachers who would offer counselling and also hear cases related to frustrations witnessed at any stage of their educational journeys. The school must be prepared to vote cash to cater for this sort of important human relationship Counseling mechanisms to stave off the rising cases of suicide. The school must not be all about profitability.

The Nigerian police and other relevant law enforcement agencies like NAFDAC must monitor the activities of traders who deal in chemical and drugs related products such as snipers with a view to ascertaining identities of buyers and the use to which these products would be put into. There is also the need for state governments and the Federal government to embark on deliberate but massive public enlightenment programmes to warn youngsters to choose life over death and to resolutely beat back all suicidal tendencies through the cocktails of effective means of communication and getting counseling service from toll free lines that should be publicized for all Nigerians to be conversant with.

For instance, the European Council on Human Rights has successfully repealed the death penalty because of the overwhelming rating of Right to life in Europe. In Article 2 of the European wide laws on human rights, it is legally provided that: “Everyone’s right to life shall be protected by law. This right is one of the most important of the Convention since without the right to life it is impossible to enjoy the other rights. No one shall be condemned to death penalty or executed. The abolition of death penalty is consecrated by Article 1 of Protocol No. 6.”

The Nigerian Constitution in Section 33(1) provides that “Everyone has a right to life. ”

*Emmanuel Onwubiko is the Head of the Human Rights Writers Association of Nigeria.

The post Nigerian Youths Should Choose Life, Not Death — Emmanuel Onwubiko appeared first on Information Nigeria.

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How religion divides and under-develops Africa by Reno

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Reno Omokri
Reno Omokri

By Reno Omokri

Yesterday, I saw Nigerian Shiites demonstrating against the United States and President Donald Trump, and I groaned in my spirit. When will Africans become themselves and stop being remote controlled by foreign interests?

Most Africans think they chose their religions. Not true. As a matter of fact, the vast majority of Africans had their religions handed down to them by Europeans or Arabs. How do I mean?

Let us take Nigeria as a case study. Most Nigerians are either Christian, Muslims, or Catholics. Many of them will even die to defend their faiths. But how did they get these faiths?

Most Muslims in Northern Nigerian were born into Islam. Most Nigerian Muslims did not make a conscious decision to become Muslims. They just found themselves as Muslims and accepted it. But the historical fact is that most of their ancestors were CONQUERED into Islam, either by the Usman Dan Fodio jihad of 1804, or by the Kanem Bornu empire (one of the oldest empires on Earth), or by Arabs during the the Tran Saharan Slave Trade. This is a historical fact and I do not mean to upset my beloved Muslim followers.

At first they resisted. Then they were conquered. They were FORCED to accept Islam. Those who refused were killed, and the survivors, fearing a similar fate, accepted the new religion. Then they had children who knew nothing but Islam, and the rest is history.

Nigeria was colonised by Britain. Britain is OFFICIALLY a very staunch Protestant nation, with the Church of England (Anglican Church) as the OFFICIAL state church. Have Nigerians ever wondered why the British allowed Catholicism to flourish in Nigeria even when it was suppressed in Britain for centuries? Or why they did not allow Christian Missionaries into the North?

Other than the Binis and Itsekiri, who voluntarily accepted Catholicism in the 15th Century due to their trade with the Portuguese, Catholicism only gained ground in Nigeria, and especially amongst the Igbos of the East of Nigeria, in the 19th Century.

The British had a colonial policy of Divide and Rule. They did not allow Christian missionaries into Nigeria for love of Christianity or God, or Africans. It was a deliberate colonial policy to sow discord and division in Nigeria and their other colonial territories all over the world, and to keep nations, like Nigeria, ever subservient to Europe as a supplier of raw materials and human labour in times of war (Nigerians in their thousands fought for the British in both World Wars and were often used almost as cannon fodder) and in times of peace (Nigerians are a backbone of the health sector in both the UK and US. 77% of all Black doctors in America are Nigerian).

The British decided that Anglicanism snd other forms of Protestantism should thrive amongst the Yoruba and that Catholicism should thrive amongst the Igbo, and they refused to let Christian missionaries proselytise in the North to keep it Muslim, so that both the South and the North would be perpetually divided and check each other, and will never be able to unite against the colonialists.

Every missionary that came to Nigeria was licensed by the British. The Catholicism you see in Igboland today is the fruit of four Catholic missionaries who arrived Onitsha in 1885, as part of the Holy Ghost Fathers, led by a certain Reverend Father Lutz. In fact, the house where they first stayed was owned by the Royal Niger Company (which influenced the formation of the colonial Nigerian government, and even provided personnel for them. Lord Lugard was a staff of the Royal Niger Company).

Meanwhile, as they were promoting Catholicism in Eastern Nigeria, the British were promoting Protestantism in Western Nigeria, where Henry Townsend planted the first church in Badagry, in 1842. When the British rescued Samuel Ajayi Crowther from Fulani and Portuguese slavers, he was handed over to the Church Missionary Society (the proselytising mission of the Anglican Church), who educated him, and used him to extend Anglicanism amongst the Edekiri people. Ajayi Crowther eventually changed their name to Yoruba (a bastardisation of the Fulani word Yaribansa), because the British wanted a common identity for all Edekiri people.

That is how we come to have a Nigeria dominated by Muslims in the North, Anglicans and other Protestants in the West, and Catholicism in the East. It was not by chance. It was not by the choice of Nigerians. To the largest extent, with only very few exception, it is by design of external powers.

I urge Africans to think about their religions. Do not just accept your religion because of the accident of your birth. Your eternal soul is too valuable to be left to chance.

I use myself as an example. I was born to a Catholic mother and an Anglican father. While my mother schooled in Europe, I was anglicised by the rest of the family who were Anglican.

I remained an Anglican until I went to university. Free at last from my parents, I at first became a campus evangelist at the University of Benin in 1990 at the age of 16, until I left for another university and became an atheist at age 18, and began reading The Bible, and the Quran in other to know the true God.

May God bless my parents, they did not interfere. They did not force me to go to church. They left me to choose.

For one whole year, I did not believe in God, until after reading Scripture, the Quran and Dr. Yongi Cho’s (now David Yongi Cho) book, the Fourth Dimension, I found God by myself. Alone. Without the help of Arabs, or Europeans, or my parents. That is why today, NOTHING can shake my faith. I was not born as a Christ follower. I was CONVINCED into following Christ by Scripture and a personal experience with God and I was ordained as a pastor on January 15, 2012.

If all Africans can free their minds and choose their religion by themselves, Africans will stop being divided and fighting each other on the basis of religion and region, and we will no longer by the patsies of European and Arab nations, and Africa will be truly free to become the greatest continent on Planet Earth.

Reno Omokri

Gospeller. Deep Thinker. #1 Bestselling author of Facts Versus Fiction: The True Story of the Jonathan Years. Avid traveller. Hollywood Magazine Film Festival Humanitarian of the Year, 2019.

The post How religion divides and under-develops Africa by Reno appeared first on Vanguard News.

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Deepika Padukone at JNU: With far more to lose, Bollywood’s women have shown far more spine than its ‘heroes’ | Entertainment News,The Indian Express

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Written by Yashee
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Updated: January 8, 2020 6:01:47 pm

In Bollywood as in the world, it’s the women who are smashing the status quo, at great personal risk. The actors, with far greater appeal and access, remember political causes before their movies, but then retreat to asking questions about mangoes.

The pictures of Deepika Padukone at JNU have by now launched more than a thousand tweets, many in support of her, many condemning her for aligning herself with the ‘tukde tukde gang’ , yet others claiming she was only trying to promote her movie while in the same breath adding they will boycott that movie.

Taking an obvious risk days before the release of Chhapaak, which she is also producing, Padukone has made an unmissable statement, and raised yet again a getting-harder-to-ignore question — where are Bollywood’s men?

The A-listers who have for decades ruled the roost and millions of hearts, whose hairstyles, dialogues, gestures and clothes the country has been united in copying, why do we not know what they think about the issues polarising the country today?

The recent protests against the Citizenship Amendment Act, the proposed National Register of Citizens, and the police crackdown against agitating students have seen unprecedented Bollywood involvement. Actors and directors like Swara Bhasker, Mohammed Zeeshan Ayyub, Richa Chadha, Anurag Kashyap, Anubhav Sinha, Dia Mirza and many others have not just spoken up on social media, but actively turned up for rallies and protests.

Yet, till very recently, the A-listers were missing. The merchants of fairytales, who have built their careers and their millions on “feel-good” cinema, stayed away from the grimy hurly-burly of politics.

However, in the past few days, actresses, one by one, have broken this unwritten rule. Sonam Kapoor and Alia Bhatt have condemned the recent incidents in no uncertain words. And now, Deepika Padukone has physically turned up at a protest venue.

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Padukone wasn’t at JNU as a star. She did not take centrestage, she did not make a speech. She was there, as a member of her team said, because she wanted to “express her anguish” at the violence in the campus, just like many other concerned citizens have been doing in city after city, at protest after protest.

Deepika Padukone knows better than most stars what this could unleash — as recently as in 2017, a BJP leader had announced a Rs 10 crore bounty on her head for starring in Padmaavat, while the Karni Sena wanted to chop off her nose.

Even without personal experience, Bollywood heroines know what’s at risk in triggering the troll brigade. Just reading Bhasker’s timeline for an hour can turn your stomach, make you want to go off social media forever.

Yet, Sonam Kapoor, Alia Bhatt and Deepika Padukone chose to take the risk. What prevents the men? The Kapoors, the Khans, the Bachchans, who wield enormously more power, and run far fewer risks?

It is no one’s case that the “heroes” don’t stand to lose by taking a political stand. Just a few years ago, both Shah Rukh Khan and Amir Khan had people — including BJP leaders — sending them to Pakistan when they spoke up about the growing intolerance in the country. Then Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis had to personally broker a peace deal between Karan Johar and MNS goons during the release of Ae Dil Hai Mushkil.

It can also be argued that in a democracy, a public figure does have the right to remain totally apolitical, however questionable that choice.

Yet, in an industry where the scales are anyway tilted against them, it’s the women of Bollywood who have stood up to be counted.

Women are paid less, have a shorter shelf life in Bollywood, are more dispensible. As we have heard for ages, few heroines can “carry a movie on their shoulders”, which is also because they rarely get parts written for them — a beautiful face and charismatic screen presence are all that is required of the leading lady in most “mainstream” movies.

In a notoriously risk-averse industry dominated by risk-averse men, women can easily be dropped from projects and endorsements for showing “political adventurism”. Bhasker, indeed, has spoken about losing work because of her political stands.

For the audience too, a woman with an opinion can be more difficult to stomach than a man. Men can obviously be interested in “serious matters”, but how inconvenient to enjoy a beautiful woman dancing to a beautiful song when you know her sympathies lie with the tukde tukde gang!

Also, the attacks against the women are far more vicious, and far crasser, than against men. People see a woman with an opinion as a greater transgression, and the more her mind infuriates them, the more they target her body — sexually explicit threats and “jokes” are generally the weapons of choice against women.

Anurag Kashyap has been faced with relentless trolling for long now, so has Javed Akhtar. But they haven’t had people from within their own fraternity calling them “sasti” (cheap), as happened with Bhasker and film-writer Raaj Shaandilyaa recently.

Even during the Padmavat fracas, it was Deepika Padukone’s head and nose on the line, not her male co-stars Shahid Kapoor and Ranveer Singh’s.

And it is not like the men of Bollywood eschew politics altogether. Akshay Kumar’s recent movies have — co-incidentally? — been themed around the projects the government wants to promote: building toilets, vanquishing foreign Muslim invaders. In this Kumar is not alone, though he is the only one to have interviewed the PM about his mango-eating preferences (again, an opportunity given only to a man).

Many A-listers had happily posed for a grinning selfie with the PM at a time when it was impossible to not know its significance.

Amitabh Bachchan, who has had perhaps the longest successful run at Bollywood, stars in the government’s advertisements, but is resolutely silent when that government seems to be turning against its own people.

The appeal these stars wield is unparalleled — any cause that Salman Bhai raises his hands for, maybe with that blue bracelet, that Bachchan lends his baritone and gravitas or Shah Rukh his dimples and his charm to, will instantly get the kind of resonance a hundred erudite editorials and speeches by JNU alumni can’t garner.

These stars are well-aware of their great power. They choose not to see the great responsibility it comes with.

Even outside Bollywood, the CAA-NRC protests have been dominated by women — the brave ladies of Shaheen Bagh are a shining, heartening example. Perhaps it is time we rewrite our definition of “heroes”, change whom we look at for inspiration and solidarity. For now, the women of Bollywood have proven to be far more heroic than the stars who rule it.

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Missing Boy: Court remands 13 suspects over burning of church in Ondo

The Magistrate Court sitting in Akure, Ondo State capital, has ordered the remand of 13 people to Olokuta Correctional Center, over their alleged involvement in the killing of a policeman and setting ablaze of Sotitobire Miracle Centre.

The accused who were dragged before Magistrate Charity Adeyanju, on a six-count charge bothering on murder, arson, theft, and vandalism.

The Police Prosecutor, ASP Moses Adeosun, prayed the court to remand the accused at the Olokuta Correctional Centre pending the ongoing investigation into the matter.

Reading the charge sheet read in part, he said “that you Udeme Eyo ‘m’, Ikechukwu Njoku ‘m’, Ayodimeji Jimoh ‘m’, Bamisaye Ojo ‘m’, Balogun Ayomide ‘m’, ‘Steve Adekunle ‘m’, Agbi Sesan ‘m’, Stephen Omotosho ‘m’, Omogbolahan James ‘m’, Ademola Aderibigbe ‘m’, Oluwadare Rotimi, ‘m’, Ayo Ifedayo ‘m’, Samuel Shitu and others at large, on 18/12/2019, at about 9.45 am, Sotitobire church, Oshinle, Akure, in the Ondo State Magisterial District, did conspire together to commit felony to wit: murder, arson, malicious damage and stealing and thereby committed an offence contrary to and punishable under section 324 & 516 of the Criminal Code, Cap 37, Vol.1, LAWS of Ondo State of Nigeria 2006 respectively.

“That you Udeme Eyo ‘m’, Ikechukwu Njoku ‘m’, Ayo Dimeji Jiomoh ‘m’, Bamisaye Samson Ojo ‘m’, Balogun Ayorinde ‘m’, Steve Adekunle ‘m’, Agbi Sesan ‘m’, Stephen Omotosho ‘m’, Omogbolahan James ‘m’, Ademola Aderibigbe ‘m’, Oluwadare Rotimi ‘m’, Ayo Ifedayo ‘m’, Samuel Shitu and others at large, on same date, time committed the offence In the aforementioned Magisterial District, did unlawfully kill Sgt Sheidu by smashing him to death with tyre ream and stones at Sotitobire church, Oshile, Akure while performing his lawful duty and thereby committed an offence contrary to and punishable under section 319(1) of Criminal Code, Cap 37, Vol.1 Laws of Ondo State of Nigeria 2006.”

However, the Counsel to the defendants objected to the prayer of the prosecutor counsel, arguing on the need for his clients to be granted bail.

He told the court that the prosecution had a lot of defects and said that “In order for them to put their house in order, they had to come back another day with the application to remand them as the Magistrate Court lacks jurisdiction to prosecute the offences charged.

Following the arguments of the prosecutor and the Defence Counsel, the defendants were subsequently remanded with the trial adjourned till January 3, 2020.

It will be recalled that on some angry youths attacked the church which belongs to Prophet Alfa Babatunde who was alleged of being behind the mysterious disappearance of a one-year-old baby, Gold Kolawole.

The enraged youth during the attack burnt down the church as well as the vehicles of church members after which they proceeded to the Prophet’s residence where they allegedly looted valuables.

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Saudi sentences five to death, three to jail over Khashoggi killing

Saudi Arabia on Monday sentenced five people to death and three more to jail terms, totalling 24 years, over the killing of Saudi journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, in Istanbul in October last year.

Saudi Deputy Public Prosecutor and spokesman, Shalaan al-Shalaan, reading out the verdict in the trial, said the court dismissed charges against the remaining three of the 11 people that had been on trial, finding them not guilty.

Khashoggi was a U.S. resident and critic of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the kingdom’s de facto ruler.

He was last seen at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, 2018, where he had gone to receive papers ahead of his wedding.

His body was reportedly dismembered and removed from the building, and his remains have not been found.

The killing caused a global uproar, tarnishing the crown prince’s image.

The CIA and some Western governments have said they believe Prince Mohammed ordered the killing, but Saudi officials say he had no role.

Eleven Saudi suspects were put on trial over his death in secretive proceedings in Riyadh.

In the investigation into the murder, 21 were arrested and 10 were called in for questioning without arrest, Shalaan said.

Riyadh’s criminal court pronounced the death penalty on five individuals, whose names have not yet been released, “for committing and directly participating in the murder of the victim’’.

READ ALSO: Khashoggi memorial to be held outside Saudi consulate

The three sentenced to prison were given various sentences totalling 24 years “for their role in covering up this crime and violating the law’’.

Shalaan added that the investigations proved there was no “prior enmity” between those convicted and Khashoggi.

The verdicts can still be appealed.

Last November, the Saudi prosecutor said that Saud al-Qahtani, a former high-profile Saudi royal adviser, discussed Khashoggi’s activities before he entered the Saudi consulate with the team that went on to kill him.

The prosecutor said Qahtani acted in coordination with Deputy Intelligence Chief Ahmed al-Asiri, who he said, had ordered Khashoggi’s repatriation from Turkey and that the lead negotiator on the ground then decided to kill him.

Both men were dismissed from their positions but while Asiri went on trial, Qahtani did not.

On Monday Shalaan said Asiri has been released due to insufficient evidence and Qahtani had been investigated but was not charged and had been released.

Reuters/NAN)

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