Detective Agencies, Film Noir and Society’s Relationship to the Elderly: Maite Alberdi on Her Doc, The Mole Agent | Filmmaker Magazine

ChileThe Mole Agent

Responding to a help-wanted ad, 85-year-old Sergio Chamy agrees to infiltrate a Santiago nursing home as a “mole agent” to find out if a client’s mother is being abused. As a “spy” he uncovers a hidden world of frustration and loneliness. 

Maite Alberdi’s documentary borrows from film noir before evolving into an unsettling look at the lives of the elderly. It was developed with the help of the Sundance Institute Documentary Film Program and the Tribeca Film Institute. The Mole Agent screened at Sundance, and is available on demand starting September 1.

Filmmaker spoke with Alberdi from her office in Santiago.

Filmmaker: How did you start on this project?

Maite Alberdi: I wanted to make a documentary about private detectives. I’m a super fan of film noir and pulp fiction, and I realized that I never saw a documentary that centered around a detective agency. That was my starting point. I researched agencies, which is how I met Romulo, a retired police officer who had his own shop. He handled several “mole” cases. I worked with him a couple of times, and one of the cases involved the retirement home. I realized I wanted to shoot there.

Filmmaker: What did you do for Romulo?

Alberdi: I followed people. I would meet with clients, interview them, take notes. Then I had cases where parents wanted to follow their children, or I followed couples. A lot of things.

Romulo usually worked with the same mole, but he broke his hip and had to be replaced when we were ready to start shooting. Romulo put an ad in the paper to find and train a new mole.

Filmmaker: So in effect Romulo cast Sergio.

Alberdi: No, he wasn’t going to pick Sergio. I had to convince him. Romulo wanted someone else, someone I didn’t think was empathetic. The one Romulo liked was accompanied by his wife during the interview. And Romulo being super-machismo, I could say, “Maybe the wife will be there all the time. She could be a problem. That won’t happen with Sergio.”

Filmmaker: You were like a private eye yourself, investigating the investigators.

Alberdi: Exactly. I feel Sergio’s job is super-similar to my job as documentary filmmaker. Because when I’m shooting, I spend a lot of time, waiting, waiting, until I have the scene. Documentary filmmaking requires a lot of patience. Some days I never press “rec” because nothing interesting is happening. For Sergio it’s the same, he’s waiting, following people, waiting, waiting until he takes the pictures or until he gets the proof that he needs. 

I’m always spying on people. They know I’m there, that’s the big difference. I observe people without participating.

Filmmaker: How did you persuade the nursing home to agree to filming?

Alberdi: We said that I want to make a film about old age. I had previously released a film in Chile about older people, so it wasn’t weird that I wanted to shoot there. We said we would shoot both the good things and the bad things that happen there. So if we see something bad, we will show it. They signed an agreement to that effect. Then we said, if someone new arrives we want to focus on their experiences. That they allowed too. We introduced ourselves to the staff, and we started to shoot inside the retirement home for three weeks before Sergio arrives. When he came, we acted as if we didn’t know each other.

There was a real client, a real case that Sergio was working on. It was a family problem, someone wanted to prove to her brothers and sisters that their mom wasn’t okay there. Of course I started to realize that the nursing home was a good place, and then I felt super-guilty about lying to them. 

When we finished the film, they were the first people we showed it to. I said, “I lied to you, it was a film about a mole.” When they saw it, they loved it. They cried a lot. Now they are the best promoters of the film.

Filmmaker: One of the saddest aspects of The Mole Agent is that it shows how even with a good environment and a caring staff, the elderly have trouble dealing with isolation.

Alberdi: We always put the blame on the institution. Like with school, and my kids, it’s always the teacher’s fault. But I’m the one who’s not building a community there.

With retirement homes it’s the same. We put our old people there and forget them. We don’t work to make it a good place, a community. You can correct the problem by connecting them with families, integrating them into society. In Latin America it’s really common to isolate older people. It was the same with my previous film [The Grown-Ups, 2016], which was about people with Down Syndrome. Their parents put them in a special needs school, and fifty years later they’re still there.

Filmmaker: Your visual style is arresting. The Mole Agent settles into the rhythms of the elderly, and the imagery that reflects their feelings.  Can you talk about collaborating with cinematographer Pablo Valdés?

Alberdi: I have been working with Pablo for 10 years, we’ve made, I think, five films together. Here I really wanted to make a film noir, I wanted to shoot angles like a fiction film. We had some style references, but we ended up using the same techniques we always use.

We spend a lot of time with people until they get used to the camera. I would try to figure out which ones didn’t, so we wouldn’t shoot them. The people in the home have a routine that doesn’t change very much. They have lunch at the same time, for example. It’s like my life, I don’t change that much, I know my routine. So if I know, I can predict how things are going to happen, and at what time and place.

We spend a lot of time planning the frame. And then it’s wait. For example, that’s why I don’t use a handheld camera. Because we can never wait that long holding a camera. I would love to make a film with a more mobile camera, but we can’t move. 

Filmmaker: You said in an interview that reality is cyclical, and that you discover patterns within it.

Alberdi: I don’t make films about the past. I am shooting in the present in all of my films. When I’m shooting, I trust that if I wait, the things that I saw before will happen again. I don’t know when, but they are going to happen. So as I saw the other mole cases, in my mind I knew what kind of things Romulo was going to ask Sergio. So I knew what I am going to shoot.

I’m going to give you an example from the first film where I learned that. It’s called  A Lifeguard (El salvavidas, 2011). The main character thinks that the best lifeguard is the one who never needs to go into the water — he prevents accidents from happening. But he works at the most dangerous beach in Chile, where every summer someone drowns. My concern was, okay, I have a film about the lifeguard. He has to face whether or not to go into the water. And I need that in my narrative. But how can I shoot that I’m shooting a second character, or I’m running around someplace else?

Okay, I have to study the behavior at this beach. I spent a summer trying to understand the routines there. I studied the marine statistics. I learned that all of the people drowned at the same place between five and six in the evening. I didn’t know which day it was going to happen, but I knew the time and the place. So we spent all the summer in the same place at the same time waiting. We were there when it happened, and we have it in the film.

Filmmaker: But you’re still selecting, choosing as you go along. There is a scene in The Mole Agent you couldn’t have predicted, when a frightened woman breaks down into tears in front of Sergio.

Alberdi: In some ways you can predict, because you learn the world there. There were 50 women in the home, and we choose six to follow because we knew something was going to happen to them. That woman, for example, she’s saying her son didn’t come to visit. That’s something she said to other people, something she said to me. So I knew when Sergio introduced himself, she would say something similar.

Filmmaker: That moment reaches a universal truth, the fear everyone faces about growing old. It stripped away the rest of the narrative framework for me.

Alberdi: I believe that documentary filmmaking is like being a sculptor. You have this big rock that is reality, and it is big, because that place has a lot of people. You have to chisel until a figure appears. The decision about what you are taking out is more important than what you are keeping.

Filmmaker: You had 300 hours of material. How difficult was the editing process?

Alberdi: We had a lot of versions. For example that scene you mentioned, at the time I shot it I was living with Sergio in the home. I was living the same feelings as he did. I had the same emotional commitments. And I have to deal in the editing with how to balance the original case, and my emotional experiences. 

We shot the case, the client, all the details about her. In the beginning I thought I had to explain everything, and until the end what I was shooting, the narrative plot, was the case itself. In the editing room I found my heart was not in the case. Yeah, it was rational, it advanced the story. But my emotions were what was driving me forward. It was super-difficult to realize that, to say for example, “Okay, the client is not going to appear after all.”

It took me a year to remove the client and make the movie Sergio’s journey. Or, for example, the decision to put myself in a shot. That was an editing decision. We edited in the Netherlands and showed it to a lot of Dutch people who kept asking, “Is this really a documentary?” I didn’t want people to get lost, I preferred to put that in the beginning to make it easier for you to enter into the story.

Filmmaker: What’s your next project?

Alberdi: We are very early in shooting about a young couple. The man is fifty years old, he has Alzheimer’s, and it’s a love story about how the couple deals with that. Covid has made it terrible for them, and for me too because I can no longer shoot them. But she’s started shooting, and has brought a new life to the project. 

It’s frustrating for everybody, not just me. It’s difficult after working on this for so many years to try to adapt to new forms of exhibition. My mind needs to be more open.

Related posts

Bernell Trammell death: Milwaukee shooting victim’s memory stays alive

He ‘gave freedom to everyone’s voice’: A week after shooting death of Bernell Trammell, friends keep his legacy alive

Sophie Carson
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Published 12:00 AM EDT Aug 1, 2020

Bernell Trammell spent his life starting conversations.

He loved hearing what passing strangers had to say. Trammell eagerly sought out discussion — on sidewalks, homemade signs in hand, and through submissions to his publication, eXpressions Journal.

“Everybody has a voice. Everybody’s voice has power,” longtime friend Pia Lombardi recalled Trammell saying.

When he was shot and killed last week outside his Riverwest office, Trammell’s own voice was silenced, Lombardi said.

But at a vigil for him Friday, his memory and message remained vibrant. Friends recalled his good nature and willingness to chat, and neighbors said the city lost an irreplaceable local character.

“Milwaukee, the east side, Riverwest — we’re going to miss him. Because he was very vocal,” said neighborhood resident Alicia Williams. 

Because Trammell was outspoken about religion and politics — and supported President Donald Trump — some suspect he was targeted for his beliefs. Prominent conservatives have called for a federal investigation into his death, and the suspicion of a political motivation made national news and gained traction on social media.

Lombardi said she even received an invitation to appear on commentator Laura Ingraham’s Fox News show.

Milwaukee police have not released any information about possible motives for the killing.

Trammell also carried signs supporting the Black Lives Matter Movement and state Sen. Lena Taylor, a Democrat.

Those who knew Trammell said they don’t know why he was killed and can’t understand why anyone would shoot him. More than a week after his death, they don’t have any answers. Police have asked the public’s help in looking for a suspect in the shooting and have offered a cash reward for tips. 

Malcolm Hunt, a chaplain for the Milwaukee Police Department, speaks and prays for his friend Bernell Trammell during a memorial vigil.
Rick Wood / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Nate Fox of Milwaukee called Trammell a “gentle beast” who was genuinely interested in hearing different perspectives.

About 15 years ago, Fox used to see Trammell around Riverwest, dressed in a leather jacket and leather chaps.

“He didn’t look like a very approachable guy,” Fox laughed. “But if you would actually have a conversation with him you would see that he’s genuine, that he would hear you out.”

Fox, an atheist at the time, started going to Trammell with questions about religion. He didn’t know many Christians, and Trammell never judged him, he said.

Eventually Fox converted to Christianity. He credits Trammell for those early eye-opening conversations that challenged his stereotypes on what people of faith looked and acted like.

Trammell “gave freedom to everyone’s voice,” said Clayton Hotelling, a Milwaukee pastor and social worker. “It didn’t matter where you were from.”

In the 1990s Hotelling used to read eXpressions Journal and even submitted his artwork to the publication a few times. He appreciated that Trammell gave a platform to opinions of all kinds without judgment — the willingness to hear someone out has been lost in today’s political discourse, he said.

Hotelling was driving with a friend on the east side two days before Trammell’s death and saw him on the sidewalk holding a Trump sign. Hotelling honked his horn, and Trammell gave them a thumbs-up.

“It touched our heart because that was the last time we saw him,” Hotelling said.

Bernell Trammell of Milwaukee takes a photo with his cellphone while with son, Bernell Trammell Jr., 7, at a control burn at Alice Bertschy Kadish Park in Milwaukee on May 7, 2013. Trammell was fatally shot outside his office in Riverwest on July 23, 2020.
Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Patricia Holland also saw Trammell shortly before his death — she estimates about 30 minutes prior.

Holland maintains church gardens in Riverwest and headed last Thursday to Trammell’s shop to plant some flowers in his new flower beds. She left him laughing, promising to water the plants that evening.

Then from her home Holland heard what she thought were firecrackers. She followed police cars to the scene and saw paramedics performing CPR. But she knew Trammell hadn’t made it.

“A whole chill came over me,” she said.

Trammell deserves for his killer to be found, Holland said. Somebody in the neighborhood knows something, she said, pointing to the surrounding apartments and homes.

And Trammell deserves for his legacy to live on. Lombardi, who lived with Trammell in the 1990s in the apartment above his office, plans to buy the building on East Wright Street. 

She wants to continue publishing eXpressions Journal. Trammell’s voice may have been silenced, but he’d want Milwaukee to keep talking.

Contact Sophie Carson at (414) 223-5512 or scarson@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter at @SCarson_News.

Related posts

Perspective | It’s time we stopped with the phrase “gifted and talented”

By Stephanie Sprenger
@mommyforreal

Last week, I saw two toddlers wearing “Genius” T-shirts. When I saw the first one, I smiled, as I undeniably have a soft spot for ironic baby clothing. But when just hours later the second “genius” came waddling along, it gave me pause. I know these clever shirts proclaiming that our children are “brave like Daddy” or “sassy like Mommy” are just supposed to be funny and cute. Yet I feel slightly troubled by what lies under the surface of our attempts to label our children with myriad superlatives.

The “Genius” one left a distinctly bad taste in my mouth, and after a few days of pondering, I realized why. It was a tiny incarnation of the “gifted and talented” program, which is a concept I’ve been struggling with as a parent.

When I was in 5th grade, I was selected to participate in TAG (yes, talented and gifted), a program that took place during two hours of every Friday afternoon. I recall playing challenging brain games that required teamwork and higher-level questioning, completing independent study projects, on one occasion making a collage about photography (hmmm), and then trotting merrily back to class with my other above-average classmates.

I moved the following year, and was placed in a similar program with a different name: Alpha. Was it, shudder, because we were “alpha students?” It was my first and last meeting. Although I carried straight A’s—aside from my B in P.E.—after a snide comment from one of my fellow Alpha students, I chose never again to participate in a gifted and talented program.

Over the years, I’ve heard it referred to as ULE—Unique Learning Experience—and Exceptional Learners, but where I live now it’s straight up “GT—gifted and talented.” My experience with GT as a parent of non-GT students has been eye-opening.

When my oldest daughter, now 13, was in Montessori preschool, the staff provided a parent meeting where we could ask questions about kindergarten and elementary school options. Hands shot up all around the room: “Tell us more about the GT programs in the district.” “When can we test for GT?” Aside from the occasional inquiry about bilingual education programs, it was pretty much the same: How do we get into the GT program?

My husband and I raised our eyebrows at each other. Who knew that all this time our precocious little darling had been surrounded by entirely gifted students? Over the next few years, acquaintances would ask me when I was getting my daughter tested for GT. “I’m not,” I usually replied simply. The high-pressure program was not something I wanted for my child, who now is a 4.0 honor roll student in middle school. To be honest, I wasn’t really sure she qualified for GT; her grades have much more to do with her personality and determination. But the entire operation left a bad taste in my mouth.

Semantics matter to me, perhaps more than most people. Don’t even get me started on my hang-ups about the word “blessed.” To me, being “gifted and talented” sounds a whole lot like being bestowed with a well, gift, that others were not granted. It’s pretentious, and slightly obnoxious.

However, the value of these programs is undeniable. There are students whose needs are not being met in a one-size-fits-all curriculum: a multitude, and not just the above average variety. It is difficult to comprehend the challenge of teachers who must constantly adapt their learning experience to the diverse group of students they teach. These programs are absolutely essential and provide a much-needed, enriching, stimulating education for the kids who are becoming bored in their classrooms, who are potentially even causing problems because they aren’t being challenged.

The future of New York City’s public gifted and talented programming is now in the spotlight, thanks to the mayor-appointed School Diversity Advisory Group’s recommendation that the existing GT programs be replaced by magnet schools. A group of gifted education teachers have instead called for an overhaul and reform of the system instead of elimination, which they hope may affect other GT programs around the country. But perhaps there is more fundamental reform required than altering the selection process and addressing the issues of economic privilege and racial segregation.

Perhaps what we really need to address is what we call these programs and the way parents conceive of them. The pressure behind TAG, including the language we use to describe it, needs to change. So too the frenetic rush to test our kids, not necessarily because we want to accommodate their learning style, but because of the proclamation that they are gifted and talented and therefore destined for a higher purpose, will lead to a breeding ground of stress, anxiety, and self-esteem issues. And what does it do to the kids who are excluded from this elite group?

I often cringe when I hear someone counter the name of these kind of programs with the sentiment that “All kids are gifted and talented in their own way.” Because it sounds so trite—the equivalent of a participation award. And yet. At the risk of revealing myself as a special snowflake kind of person, I do believe all children are gifted and talented. Whether they are athletic, artistic, deeply empathetic, or bold leaders, or simply themselves. Platitudes be damned, they are all gifted and talented in their own way.

It’s time to change the labels of these advanced or specialized learning classrooms to reflect that. Our children are paying attention, and they can absolutely read between the lines. What kind of message do we want to send them?

Stephanie is a writer, mother of two girls, early childhood educator and music therapist, and Executive Producer of Listen To Your Mother Denver and Boulder.

Image: an actual shirt that was given to one of our editor’s children.

Like what you are reading at Motherwell? Please consider supporting us here. 

Keep up with Motherwell on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and via our newsletter. 

Related posts

Parkrun fanatic ticks off Dumbarton venue in her global quest – Daily Record

Thank you for subscribingWe have more newslettersShow meSee ourprivacy notice

Parkrun has become a global phenomenon and, despite still being in its infancy, Levengrove’s event is already attracting new visitors to Dumbarton.

German Parkrun fanatic Julia Loecherbach is one of those who has travelled to the shadow of the Rock to take on the Levenside venue’s challenging trails.

And for Julia it’s far from the first time she’s travelled for an event.

She told the Lennox Herald: “I’ve now done 44 different Parkruns including some in Germany, Ireland and Poland.

“I’m from Germany originally but since 2012 I’ve lived in Scotland, first in Edinburgh and now because of work I live in Alloa.

“Initially, it was quite a slow burner. I’ve been doing Parkruns since 2013 and that’s how I got into running in the first place.

“It was quite far away from me in Edinburgh and on Saturdays, I was involved in cycling and other things, so it was difficult to have the time. But Parkrun gave me a bit of a focus.

“It was through that and getting involved in social media groups that I realised that Parkrun tourism was a bit of a thing.

Read More

“My partner is Irish and we always look at doing Parkruns when we’re away, but when we were over there we made it our aim to do one in Portrush in Northern Ireland where you actually run along the beach.

“I was also at a conference in Germany which didn’t start until mid-morning, so I printed off the barcode at the hotel and ran down to take part in that. I also had one at my old university which is based near the border with Poland where I just crossed over the border to say that I’d done one there too.

“In Scotland, I was once in Stonehaven for a triathlon and went up a day early to take part in the Parkrun, and I’ve done one in St Andrews when I was doing the Chariots of Fire race as well.”

The amount of events Julia has completed looks even more impressive when you consider that she’s keen to reduce her carbon footprint along the way.

She continued: “I pledged not to fly this year, so I won’t be doing many overseas, but I still have aims.

“Last time I got the train to Germany I went down on the sleeper to London, went on a Parkrun in London and then got the Eurostar into Europe.

“The Parkrun alphabet is also a thing too, so I’m trying to organise a train that stops in York because there are only two Parkruns in the country that start with a Y at the moment.”

Read More

Parkrun tourism is becoming increasingly popular throughout the country, and with new events popping up across the country every week there’s always a new challenge for runners.

Davie Black, who runs the Parkrun Scotland Friends Facebook page which has more than 3000 members, attended Levengrove’s first run – and explained what attracts so many people to Parkrun tourism.

He said: “It’s an incredibly friendly thing to belong to, but it’s been made more addictive since the beginning of Parkrun challenges.

Alloa

“People are keen to do the alphabet, but often they have to travel to Poland as it’s the easiest one to get to that begins with a Z, but there are also plenty of smaller challenges.

“There’s the Staying Alive challenge where you have to do runs beginning with B, then E, E, G, E, E or the pirates challenge which is seven beginning with a C and then an R.

Davie himself is one of a select group of just three (at the time of writing) to have completed all 58 Parkruns in Scotland, whilst he’s crossed the line at 87 different runs – and 520 times at Parkruns in total.

However he refused to pick a favourite.

He said: “Stornoway is one of the most interesting events, the course and the estate it’s on are really interesting.

“Shetland’s Bressay Parkrun is fantastic as well, it’s all run on roads which sounds dangerous but I think in the whole time there I saw two cars!”

Read More

And both visitors were impressed by what Levengrove had to offer runners.

Julia said: “Levengrove Park is really nice, the views are great and I didn’t find it that hilly which was good.

“The paths are quite wide too so you really could say that it’s perfect for a Parkrun.”

Whilst Davie was glowing in his praise of the venue

He added: “It’s a lovely park in a great location and I think it could be a jewel in the crown for Parkrun in Scotland.

“The park has a lot to offer. I’m not usually a fan of laps but there is so much to look at that I didn’t mind.

“When you look up you can see the monuments, the Rock, the river and you can see that it’s a park that has had plenty of investment.”

The appeal of Parkrun is also clear for both Julia and Davie, who urged newcomers to come along.

Julia said: “It’s for everyone, anyone can come along and have a look or volunteer, you don’t have to take part in it, they are totally open to anybody and that’s what makes them so special.”

Davie concluded: “You’re never alone at a Parkrun, that’s what I always say.

“It’s really just people who have met for a blether when a run broke out, and the running part is 50/50 with the social part of it.”

More than 270 attended last week, with co-event director Anna Napier keen to highlight why it was so successful.

She said: “Whether people are walking, jogging, running or volunteering everyone is equally welcome at Parkrun.

“For us it’s about getting as wide a range of people involved as possible, we have some very quick runners, but there are also plenty of people who come along and walk the route, and that takes about an hour.”

To find out more about Levengrove’s Parkrun, visit parkrun.org.uk/levengrove/

For more local news from West Dunbartonshire click here

Related posts

Mariska Hargitay Learns Elizabeth Taylor Was One of Her Biggest Fans

Law & Order: SVU star Mariska Hargitay comes from a Hollywood family. Her parents were movie stars Jayne Mansfield and Mickey Hargitay so, she certainly grew up meeting a famous celebrity or two. But she was still floored recently to find out that a Hollywood legend admired her acting.

Mariska Hargitay Gets A Shock

Model and businesswoman Kathy Ireland recently posted on Twitter something that she was too shy to tell Hargitay when she saw her at an airport. She took the opportunity when Hargitay posted her own tweet to promote the new SVU episode and responded with a fun fact.

“Twitter, did you know @Mariska was Elizabeth Taylor’s favorite actress?” Ireland tweeted. “True. They met when ET was filming ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ when Mariska was a child. Elizabeth loved you Mariska & never missed an episode of yours Wanted to tell you at the airport–was too shy! xo.”

Hargitay responded by simply saying she’s “floored” to learn that the violet-eyed legendary Oscar winner was an admirer of hers.

Hargitay was born on January 23, 1964, and the film version of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf was released on June 22, 1966, so, it’s likely that Taylor met Hargitay when she was still sleeping in a crib each night!

A Past Connection

Taylor shared with Us Weekly in 2011 her admiration for Hargitay and revealed that she knew Taylor’s children. “I’m mad for Law & Order and have seen every single episode,” Taylor told Us. “My children and Mariska Hargitay, a dazzling actress, played together as kids.”

While Taylor never appeared on Law & Order or any of the brand’s spinoff series, she did appear on television later in her career on such series as General Hospital, The Simpsons, The Nanny, Murphy Brown, and the TV mini-series North and South: Book 1 and the TV-movie Malice in Wonderland.

Taylor passed away on March 23, 2011, at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. She was 79 and died of congestive heart failure, surrounded by her children Michael Wilding, Christopher Wilding, Liza Todd, and Maria Burton. Taylor also had 10 grandchildren. Law & Order: SVU airs Thursdays at 10 p.m. ET on NBC.

Related posts

Man Kills Fiance, Commits Suicide in Lekki, Lagos Nigeria

Wake Up Nigeria, June 23, 2020

A Nigerian man simply identified as Chris, stabbed his fiance to death, and thereafter committed suicide in their home in Victory Park estate in Lagos state on Sunday, June 21.

According to residents of the estate, the couple moved into the estate 3 weeks ago with their two young children. Not much was known about the couple but just a day before the murder-suicide, they were spotted jogging together on Saturday night, June 20.

A neighbor who spoke on condition of anonymity to LIB, said:

On Sunday afternoon, neighbors close to the couple’s apartment heard loud music emanating from their home and this lasted for many hours.

The neighbors went to the estate office to complain about the loud music and insisted the estate officials go there and caution the couple.

The estate authorities went to the couple’s compound to appeal to them to turn down the volume of the music coming from their apartment.

They however met with the wife’s sister who was downstairs with the couple’s children. The sister immediately went upstairs so she can inform her sister and the husband about the complaint laid by the estate authorities. She knocked several times but got no response.

After waiting for so long, the sister and the estate officials decided to pull the door down. They were greeted by a horrific sight.

Apparently, the man had killed his wife. It is believed it was pre-meditated because when they got into the room, they saw different kinds of knives there. The woman’s legs and hands were bound and her mouth shut with a cellotape. The husband used a clipper to shave her hair, stabbed her head, her eyes, stabbed her multiple times with different knives.

The scene was nothing short of a horror movie.

After stabbing his wife to death, the man committed suicide by drinking sniper”

Spokesperson of the state police command, Bala Elkana who confirmed the incident to LIB, said: “it is true. Homicide detectives have sealed up the place. They have commenced investigation. The corpse of the man and the woman have been moved to the hospital for an autopsy.
2 kitchen knives were found there and two bottles of Sniper. The woman had injuries from stabbing while foams were coming out of the man’s mouth who is suspected to have taken those Snipers. Investigation is ongoing.”

Watch TVC on GOTV Ch. 27, StarTimes Ch. 121, PLAY TV Ch. 801, UHF Ch. 49

Subscribe to TVC: https://bit.ly/2PWLUir

Watch TVC Live: https://bit.ly/1nms2zw

Check out TVC website: http://tvcentertainment.tv

Follow TVC on social media: @TVCconnect

Like TVC on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tvcconnect

Follow TVC on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tvcconnect

Follow TVC on Instagram: http://instagram.com/tvcconnect

More videos from the TVC network: http://Youtube.com/tvcentertainment.tv

This content was originally published here.

Related posts