Anglican Archbishop Tells Gay Supporters To Leave The Anglican Church

“My own view is that if people wish to change the doctrine of our church, they should start a new church or join a church more aligned to their views,” he said. “But do not ruin the Anglican Church by abandoning the plain teaching of scripture.”

Anglican Archbishop-Glenn-Davies
Anglican Archbishop-Glenn-Davies

The blunt words of Sydney archbishop Glenn Davies come at a critical moment for Australian churches and demands for religious freedom

During his annual speech to the Anglican Church’s Sydney synod, Archbishop Glenn Davies told supporters of same-sex marriage to “please leave us”.

“My own view is that if people wish to change the doctrine of our church, they should start a new church or join a church more aligned to their views,” Davies said. “But do not ruin the Anglican Church by abandoning the plain teaching of scripture.”

In a report published on the Sydney Anglicans website, Davies’s media manager, Russell Powell, said the archbishop received a standing ovation at the end of his address – as indeed he had.

But in pockets of the hall, there was also discomfort, if not with the core sentiment then with the tone. For a man renowned for his civility, the language was considered blunt by many.

Davies has long been frustrated by what he believes is the excessive liberalism or tolerance of other Australian bishops towards same-sex relationships, particularly among clergy.

Now he watches as two relatively small parts of the church – the dioceses of Wangaratta in Victoria and Newcastle in New South Wales – are moving to bless same-sex marriages.

Pro-gay marriage Anglicans are walking a fine line in the Australian church. Some want a full marriage rite, such as the one that exists in the Episcopal Church of the US. Others, such as the members of the Wangaratta synod, have voted to bless same-sex marriages conducted under civil law. To Sydney’s “guardians” (their word) of orthodoxy, it is a distinction without difference.

One leading Sydney Anglican – supportive of but frustrated with Davies – could not work out if the archbishop’s call to “please leave” was a statement about “discipline within the church as opposed to grace outside it”. Was he simply insisting that bishops and priests stop agitating for the church to accommodate same-sex marriage? Or was the leader of Australia’s most powerful Anglican diocese, in an unusually intemperate spray, shunning gay Christians at the door of the church?

It took Davies four days to clarify that his imprecise comments were directed at the bishops, not the parishioners, but the hurt has been profound, especially for those working in Anglican education and social services.

This is a critical moment for Australia’s churches. They are attempting to persuade the federal government to accommodate their demands for greater religious freedom, including the right to hire staff whose lives accord to strict Biblical views of sex and sexuality. At the same time, they insist they welcome LGBT students into their schools and gay Australians to use their welfare services.

Continue reading this post on The Guardian.

The post Anglican Archbishop Tells Gay Supporters To Leave The Anglican Church appeared first on Believers Portal.

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Dan Levy Of Schitts Creek Once Feared Having To Keep Sexuality A Secret For Life

When it comes to showcasing LGBTQ-inclusive stories for a mainstream audience, Dan Levy aims to “lead by example.”

The Canadian actor and writer has earned near-universal accolades for “Schitt’s Creek,” now filming its sixth and final season. Speaking at the 2019 GLAAD Gala San Francisco on Saturday, however, Levy recalled how his early experiences coming to terms with his sexuality fueled his interest in using his creativity to impact Hollywood for the better. 

“Standing up here, it’s hard not to think back to a very specific time in my life when I was still in the closet,” said Levy, who accepted GLAAD’s Davidson/Valentini Award for his LGBTQ advocacy work. “I was in high school (in Tornto), I had a bad faux-hawk because the first ‘Mission: Impossible’ movie had just come out and I thought Tom Cruise was a real drink of water.” (Watch the full speech in the video above.) 

Not living honestly and authentically, he added, came at a deeply personal cost. 

“I legitimately thought that I would have to live with this secret — my being gay — for the rest of my life because I didn’t have the security of seeing a lot of people like myself being celebrated in popular culture,” he said. 

Levy ― the son of actor Eugene Levy and screenwriter Deborah Divine Levy ― came to rely on his family’s “fierce and unconditional” love for support before coming out at 18. Others, he said, have not been so fortunate.

“Had I not had the love to give me a sense of security, I don’t know if I would have found my way out of the closet, let alone create the opportunity for myself to tell stories on television that have effected some kind of positive change in the world,” he said. “Support, encouragement and love: three relatively simple acts of kindness that can change the course of a person’s life.”

A desire to pay it forward, he said, was the impetus that led to the creation of “Schitt’s Creek,” in which he stars as David, a fashion-forward, pansexual man engaged to a gay man, Patrick (Noah Reid). And though “Schitt’s Creek” will be coming to a close after its sixth season airs next year, Levy pledged to continue incorporating LGBTQ-inclusive narratives in his future projects. 

“I promise to continue to do my part in celebrating this radiant community in all the work that I do, big and small,” the 36-year-old said.  

Levy’s profile in Hollywood has risen exponentially since “Schitt’s Creek” became available for streaming on Netflix in 2017, two years after its debut on the little-known U.S. cable network Pop TV. 

Earlier this month, he signed a three-year deal to develop and produce new projects with Disney’s ABC Studios.

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Yes, you need to talk to your kids about porn. Here’s how to do it

Health

(CNN)At a certain age, every kid learns about the difference between fantasy and reality, whether it applies to fairy tales, video games or superhero movies.

For the generations who’ve never lived without Wi-Fi, the internet is often the first place they’re exposed to sexual imagery. And in the absence of good, comprehensive sex education, some kids may think it’s the only way to actually learn about sex.
“The sad fact is that more than half of our children get their first ‘sexual education’ from adult films on the internet,” said Dr. Mark Schoen, founder of SexSmartFilms.com and former director of sex education at the Sinclair Intimacy Institute. What’s missing is a sense of context and conversation around this imagery — a conversation that would help a young person distinguish between real sex and porn sex.
    Although many sex educators are advocating for this kind of porn literacy in schools, the conversation also needs to happen at home.
    news
    In general, there can be real benefits from having frank discussions about sex, said Debby Herbenick. In one recent study by Herbenick and her colleagues at the Indiana University School of Public Health, exposure to porn was only associated with an increased probability in having unprotected sex when parents had little-to-no sexual health communication with their children. When parent-teen sexual health communication was high, pornography use was unrelated to teenagers’ engagement in unsafe sex.
    Here’s how to approach “the talk” in the age of online porn.

    Start early

    “Parents would be wise to start discussing sexually explicit media during childhood,” said Herbenick. “It’s not just porn that they need literacy about — it’s Hollywood movies, music and social media, too.”
    Rather than viewing access to porn as a negative, welcome it as an opportunity to educate your kids. “In my experience, the more sex ed a child receives from their parents, the less likely they are to develop shame around sex and use pornography in a compulsive or unhealthy manner,” said sex therapist Kimberly Resnick Anderson.

    Just do it

    Yes

      Teens make the case for porn literacy

    “Starting the conversation can be as easy as saying something like, ‘I know this might seem like it’s coming out of nowhere, but I’m concerned about the messages you are getting about sex, sexual behaviors and what’s real or normal from the stuff that’s out there,'” said sexologist Lanae St. John.
    Or you might do some advance planning. “A conversation on sex and porn should allow for honesty and the time it takes to have a serious discussion,” advised sex therapist Heidi Crockett. “I recommend arranging an agreed upon time so that both parent and child can bring their questions and thoughts to the table.”

    Explain the differences

    Remind your child that porn is meant for entertainment, not education, in terms they can understand.
    you need to talk to your kids about porn. Here's how to do it - CNN

      What it’s really like to be an adult film star

    “I tell them that just as the ‘Fast & Furious’ movies are not driver’s ed, porn is not sex ed,” said St. John. Explain that just like movies, porn portrays how we might fantasize about things but not act on them.
    Likewise, you can stress that masturbation — to porn or otherwise — and sex are two different experiences. “It’s fun to text our friends or play video games with them online, but it’s another thing to hang out in person,” said sex therapist Kristen Lilla. “Porn can also be fun to watch, but it doesn’t mimic or replace real-life sex and relationships.”

    Don’t make assumptions

    Part of what makes porn tough to talk about is how divisive it’s become. You might hear from some adults that porn use has led to dependency, erectile dysfunction, fear of intimacy and other problems. For others, it’s simply part of a healthy sex life.
    The truth is that medical experts don’t know for certain whether porn use is truly responsible for all of the effects attributed to it; so far, there isn’t a clear scientific consensus around the influence of porn on the human adult brain, much less the teenage brain.
    Health
    While some experts say that porn is highly addictive, others say that the concept of true porn addiction isn’t supported by scientific evidence. Impulsive or compulsive porn use, this camp says, is usually a symptom of something else, such as depression or anxiety.
    The only thing we do know for certain is that the more open parents are with their kids about sexual health, the better.

    Don’t limit it to sex

    View your conversations as laying the foundation for helping children question all the media they consume.
      “We begin this process of becoming aware of how roles or stereotypes are portrayed when you watch TV or PG movies with your kids beginning when they’re 7 to 8 years old,” said sex therapist Sari Cooper. “Bringing up some of the uncomfortable feelings one has when watching a film with younger ages because of the way a woman, person of color, or a person with disability was portrayed begins a training of critical thinking with your children.”
      However you choose to approach it, know that “the talk” is really a series of conversations. When you discuss topics like sexuality, masturbation and porn early on, you open the door for trust and honesty with your kids — and that helps build a foundation for good sexual health throughout their lives.

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      Were women with brown skin, talking proudly about sex

      Explicit podcasts are booming, but the three women behind Brown Girls Do It Too say theirs is different

      Digital media

      As the truism goes, every generation thinks it invented sex. But surely this is the first to be talking about it more and doing it less?

      On Thursday, BBC Asian Network launched Brown Girls Do It Too, a six-episode sex podcast hosted by three millennial British women of second-generation Bangladeshi, Indian and Iranian heritage. Not to be confused with Brown Girls Do It, a well-established independent podcast about books, politics, race and class, the newer project is at the Carry On meets Carrie Bradshaw end of the cultural spectrum.

      In it, Poppy Jay, 33, Rubina Pabani, 31, and Roya Eslami, 24, talk about their sexual experiences and discoveries in what is pitched to listeners as a raucous, intimate over-share. And so Eslami tells of losing her virginity to a Tinder date, Pabani explains how she pulled the hottest man in the room and Jay insists sex [need not be] a special, precious thing it is just an activity for me, like going to the gym, its a function and a release.

      All three of them work in the media in London and were approached by a male producer at the station to work on the project. None of them knew each other beforehand or had even met until the day of recording.

      We went to the pub before the recording of the first episode, says Eslami, who tongue-in-cheek describes herself as a Persian princess. I think it helps were not friends when I told these girls about [the boys Ive slept with], they heard that for the first time, so I hope there is a freshness when youre listening to it.

      Thats one perspective, but some will find that Brown Girls feels contrived, and a cynical move by the Asian Network. In person, the three of them are entertaining; they insist that there is nothing like their show out there and specifically, in terms of British Asian girls talking about masturbation and blowjobs on a BBC platform, there isnt but the business of aural sex is booming.

      Women talking frankly and explicitly about sex and relationships is a major podcast genre there are now dozens out there. Given that episodes are invariably listened to solo rather than as shared experiences, the format lends itself perfectly to the subject. In the UK alone, Laid Bare, Project Pleasure and Unexpected Fluids have already been smash hits, following in the wake of Cock Tales and Inner Hoe Uprising.

      Sex is so personal, no two stories are exactly the same, says Eslami, so Im not worried about ours sounding similar. The difference for them, she says, is that we all talk a lot about being 15-year-old Asian girls, having a moustache, not being fancied by any boy in school. I want to tell [girls like that], that one day youre going to love yourself and youre going to enjoy sex and you dont need to worry about this period where you feel like a sexless being.

      The three agree that theyre horrified at the idea of their parents listening but beyond that they dont worry too much about the response they get. Of course we worry about what our mums and dads think, says Jay, but I dont even know the words for sex in Bengali its never talked about and that shame is used to control women. Sex comes with all this baggage of guilt and it really shouldnt.

      I think the members of my community who do hear about it will be shocked, but I think thats OK and its fine, nods Pabani. Its not about destroying ties to our culture or religion or communities. [Other Asians] seeing me a certain way might make bridges for women after me, to be able to be freer and to speak. Im fine with it.

      Yet on the flipside, when it comes to a broader audience, Pabani thinks it would be upsetting if people thought it was radical. Were just women talking about sex, we just happen to have melanin in our skin. And we want to feel multi-dimensional Id like people to see us as quite chill about the way we speak about sex. Were not ashamed, were proud of our exploits and the things weve learned.

      A long list of reasons have been reported as to why millennials are having less sex than generations before them economic insecurity, porn and the distraction of Netflix have been cited by psychologists explaining the 21st century sex recession. But Eslami, who also admits Ill never sleep with anyone unless Im waxed downstairs, is adamant that sex is evolving with us. I think its amazing we sext, send nudes and a guy can use an app to send his girlfriend a buzz on her sex toy from across the country.

      The three brim with contradictions, but overturning stereotypes imposed on them, they say, is key. Often, white people dont see Asian people as sexual beings. The perception is that were more modest, humble or prudes, says Eslami.

      And so she tells listeners that she has made a list of all the people she has slept with on her phone but is also still in the process of trying to orgasm with a partner. We dont come across as experts, she says. Were just girls who have done really good things with sex and really bad things with sex the theme is that were just honest about the good, bad and ugly.

      Jay, who says Ive been playing catch-up since I was 25, wants to spread the word that everyone is bonking. Theyre bonking in cars, hotel rooms, parks and we need to be honest about it.

      Eslami laughs. And by talking about it, we want to break the myths and fictitious representations of sex the sex you see on TV where there is five pumps and the girl has come? Thats not how it is.

      Listen and learn: more sex podcasts

      Laid Bare

      Three black British women have formed a special club for the sex positive and opinionated to lay bare just how much they, and their listeners, get laid.

      Project Pleasure

      By promising theyre putting the pleasure back into safe sex and healthy relationships, two friends explore how everyone can have a better time in bed.

      Savage Lovecast

      The original that spawned so many podcast offspring, Dan Savages sex and advice series started as a weekly newspaper column in North America. Now he tackles the problems posed by his listeners.

      Unexpected Fluids

      Alix Fox and Riyadh Khalaf offer real-life, embarrassingly honest stories about sex particularly when things go awry. Expect tales of amazement and despair and over-sharing from their guests.

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