Extraction: Chris Hemsworth reacts as action film nears Netflix record | The Independent

person

New Chris Hemsworth film Extraction is about to break a very impressive record.

The Australian actor’s action thriller, produced by directors Anthony and Joe Russo, arrived on Netflix on 24 April, and is on course to be watching by more than 90m households in its first month alone.

Hemsworth announced the news on his instagram page, writing: “Tyler Rake is kicking ass. Extraction is well on its way to becoming the biggest-ever film premiere on Netflix – with an estimated 90m households getting in on the action in the first fours weeks. Thanks to everyone who watched so far!”

Download the new Independent Premium app

Sharing the full story, not just the headlines

Extraction follows Hemsworth’s mercenary, who is hired to rescue the son of an international crime lord after he is kidnapped.

Despite receiving middling reviews from critics (including a ), audiences are lapping up the film, whose success has no doubt been heightened by the coronavirus lockdown.

Other Netflix titles to benefit from the strict lockdown guidelines include documentary shows and The Last Dance, which is about basketball player Michael Jordan.

However, it’s important to note that the service picks and chooses which titles it releases stats for, with a view to highlighting its successes – and that it has recently changed how it registers views.

While the service used to count a view when a user streamed at least 70 per cent of a title, it now registers them when any account has watched at least two minutes of a film or TV show.

Netflix’s belief is that if someone watches two minutes of something, they have made an intentional choice to keep it on. Autoplay is not taken into account.

Related posts

Special screening of BBC series ‘This Country’ coming to Gloucestershire and tickets are completely free – Gloucestershire Live

person
Thank you for subscribingSee our privacy notice

For fans of the Cotswold based hit TV show ‘This Country’ you could be in for a treat.

BBC Three is bringing the series back to its Cotswolds roots on January 23 – and tickets are completely free.

Fans will get to see the first two episodes of the new series followed by a Q&A with sibling stars Daisy and Charlie Cooper, producer Simon Mayhew-Archer and director Tom George.

Coming back to its Gloucestershire roots on January 23 in Cirencester the special screening will be hosted by BBC Points West Gloucestershire reporter Steve Knibbs.

Tickets to the event at Bingham Hall, Cirencester , will be allocated though a random ballot.

You can apply for tickets from 10am on January 3 to 10am on January 10.

Charlie Cooper otherwise known as ‘Lee “Kurtan” Mucklowe’ said: “We are so excited to have the screening of series three here in our hometown Cirencester , where the show was created.

“Some would call it a homecoming but the problem is we’ve never left. Big up the Cotswolds !”

This Country follows cousins Kerry and Lee ‘Kurtan’ Mucklowe through their quiet country lives.

The video will start in 8Cancel

Play now
Play now

At the 2018 BAFTAs This Country won the award for Best Scripted Comedy and Daisy won Best Female Comedy Performance. More than 33 million people have requested the show on iPlayer.

The new series airs in early 2020.

Read More

Stephanie Marshall, Head of the BBC in the West and South West, said: “We love bringing national series like This Country back to where they were made. It’s a way of thanking people in the area by giving them a sneak peek before the rest of the UK.

“Amazingly more than 4,000 people applied for tickets to the This Country screening last year.

“The BBC is committed to make more and more of its TV, radio and online content outside of London. In fact, more than 50 per cent of all our shows are now made outside of the capital.”

To apply go to the BBC Shows and Tours website here .

Follow Zasha on social media

You can see more of our trends writer Zasha Whiteway-Wilkinson’s content by following her on social media.

Follow Zasha Whiteway-Wilkinson on Facebook – Like her Facebook page to get her latest pieces in your feed and join the conversation in the comments. Click here to give it a like.

Follow her on Twitter – For first looks at her articles, click here to follow Zasha on Twitter.

Follow her on Instagram – More behind the scenes than news, with exclusive family and cat pics, click here to follow Zasha on Instagram.

For stories or content enquiries, email Zasha at – zasha.whitewaywilkinson@reachplc.com

How to follow Gloucestershire Live

Our daily newsletter  – To get the latest headlines direct to your email inbox every day,  click here .

Download our app  – it’s completely free and you’ll be the first to know about any breaking news. Search ‘Gloucestershire Live’ in your Apple App Store or Google Play Store.  

Follow Gloucestershire Live on Facebook –  Like our Facebook page to get the latest news in your feed and join in the lively discussions in the comments.  Click here to give it a like.

Follow us on Twitter –  For breaking news and the latest stories,  click here to follow Gloucestershire Live on Twitter .

Follow us on Instagram –  On the Gloucestershire Live Instagram page we share gorgeous pictures of our stunning county – and if you tag us in your posts, we could repost your picture on our page. Our Instagram Stories are also full of the best things happening in the county.  Click here to follow Gloucestershire Live on Instagram .

Related posts

Derek Acorah dead: TV psychic and Celebrity Big Brother contestant dies aged 69 after ‘very brief illness’ | London Evening Standard

person

TV mystic Derek Acorah has died aged 69, his wife has said.

The self-styled spiritual medium, whose real name is Derek Johnson, appeared on Celebrity Big Brother  in 2017 and launched the paranormal reality TV series Most Haunted in 2001.

His wife Gwen Acorah shared the news in a statement on his official Facebook page, adding that the psychic had been in intensive care after falling into a coma.

“Farewell my love! I will miss you forever! I’m devastated to announce that my beloved husband Derek has passed away after a very brief illness,” she wrote.

Derek Acorah took part in Celebrity Big Brother three years ago (PA Archive/PA Images)

“Thank you so much to everybody who has supported me – I can never thank you enough.”

She suggested that her husband had been targeted by trolls before his death in the second part of her statement.

Born in Bootle, Merseyside, in 1950, Acorah featured in regular segments on 1996 TV show The Psychic Zone before becoming a contributor on spin-off show Psychic Livetime.

Acorah got his big break on TV thanks to Psychic Livetime on satellite channel Granada Breeze, and then followed it up with his own series Predictions With Derek Acorah.

He then went to Living to feature in Most Haunted, where he was the guest medium for several series until he departed after six series in 2005 following claims of fakery.

The show’s resident parapsychologist Dr Ciaran O’Keeffe told The Mirror in late 2005 that he had set up Acorah by having other crew members feed him false information about spirits in various locations.

Dr O’Keeffe invented a long-dead South African jailer called Kreed Kafer, an anagram of Derek Faker, and said he was stunned when the TV medium “got possessed by my fictional character” at Bodmin Jail.

In 2006, Acorah’s former co-host Yvette Fielding told the Metro: “We tell people everything is real, then it turns out he was a fake, so he had to go.”

After Most Haunted, the presenter had another series called Derek Acorah’s Ghost Towns, which ran for three series in 2005 and 2006.

In 2009 Acorah attempted to contact the late King of Pop in a broadcast called Derek Acorah’s Michael Jackson: The Live Seance, but the show was widely panned by viewers and critics.

Acorah was forced to apologise to the McCann family after he was quoted as saying that that their lost daughter Madeleine was dead.

He reportedly told The Sun that she had joined the “spirit world”, greatly upsetting the McCanns, although Acorah later claimed he had been misquoted by the paper.

Acorah was banned from driving for more than two years in 2014 after admitting to driving without due care and attention and for failing to provide a breath test following a crash the previous year.

His wife said he died from a short illness (PA)

He appeared in series 20 of Celebrity Big Brother on Channel 5, where he came fourth.

Acorah was born in Bootle, Merseyside, in 1950.

He originally had aspirations to be a footballer, and was on the books of Liverpool FC but did not play a game.

He went on to play football in Australia but his career in the sport ended while he was in his late twenties due to a leg injury.

Please be respectful when making a comment and adhere to our Community Guidelines.

Community Guidelines

You can find our Community Guidelines in full
here.

Loading comments…
There are no comments yet

{{/comments}}

Related posts

The Sandman Says Women Main Eventing Is Wrong, Chris Jericho Reacts

person

• ON THIS DAY IN WWF HISTORY (December 1, 1997) – WWF RAW IS WAR

On this day in 1997, the World Wrestling Federation aired another episode of their weekly TV show ‘WWF RAW IS WAR’.

It was broadcasted from the Civic Center in Roanoke, Virginia and featured matches, interviews & storyline segments on the road to the ‘WWF In Your House 19: D-Generation X’ PPV.

Here’s the card:

1. TAKA Michinoku vs. Mr. Aguila

2. D-Lo Brown vs. Recon vs. Chainz vs. Miguel Perez Jr.

3. Rocky Maivia vs. Vader

4. Brian Christopher vs. Scott Taylor

5. Ahmed Johnson vs. Jeff Jarrett

6. Hunter Hearst Helmsley vs. Jim Neidhart

• The Sandman Says Women Main Eventing Shows Is Wrong, Chris Jericho Reacts

Impact Wrestling star Jordynne Grace noted on Twitter that ECW Legend The Sandman said to her that women main eventing wrestling shows is “wrong”.

Below is what she tweeted:

“Hey remember that time The Sandman came up to four women about to main event to tell us that women main eventing is “wrong” and “any male wrestler with any sort of experience would agree”?

Was this in 1998?

No, it was tonight. December 2019.”

Hey remember that time The Sandman came up to four women about to main event to tell us that women main eventing is “wrong” and “any male wrestler with any sort of experience would agree”?

Was this in 1998?

No, it was tonight. December 2019.

This led to multiple wrestlers, including current AEW World Champion Chris Jericho, standing up for the female wrestlers:

— Chris Jericho (@IAmJericho) December 1, 2019

Gross. I hope he stuck around to see the match and eat his words.

— ❌adison Rayne (@MadisonRayne) December 1, 2019

Really???

Most of the women wrestlers are pulling off more innovating & exciting stuff then the ever before.

Can’t tell you the amount of times I go watch a Stardom match & want to retire cos their matches are INSANE!

Let’s not interfere with progress, everyone keep killing it https://t.co/dbHTDSTZuG

— ᵂⁱˡˡ ᴼˢᵖʳᵉᵃʸ • ウィル・オスプレイ (@WillOspreay) December 1, 2019

I… am speechless

— “HEARTcore” Shazza McKenzie (@Shazza_McKenzie) December 1, 2019

— Melissa Santos (@ThisIsMelSantos) December 1, 2019

WATCH: Hot Video Of WWF Diva Sable Stripping & Showing Off Her Assets:

Related posts

See is a funny TV show, but not on purpose – The Verge

person

There’s a scene in See I would bet everything in my wallet (seven dollars, three old MetroCards, and five half-used coffee rewards cards) that it’ll go viral. It’s the one where Jason Momoa’s character picks up a book for the first time. Since the show is set centuries after a virus deprived humanity of sight, he has no idea what’s in his hands. He complains it smells like “dead bark” and holds it the way a toddler might hold a vegetable when they were in fact expecting a cookie. Then Alfre Woodard’s character demands he hand over what he’s found, and speaks its long-forgotten name: book.

It’s extremely funny in context, and probably debilitating out of it. It also makes See, Apple’s post-apocalyptic drama, one of my favorite kinds of shows: you could just plainly state something that happens in an episode, and everyone would swear you’re making it up. That doesn’t mean you should watch it.

Set in the ruins of our world, the people of See have adjusted to a sightless life after centuries of practice. Makeshift curtains of beads make for boundaries both audible and physical, fights involve a lot of probing contact and grappling (as does sex), and there’s a lot of finger snapping. See is extremely invested in showing you how all this stuff works, so much so that it barely delves into its characters.

Baba Voss (Jason Momoa) is a man who must take his family on the run after his adopted twins, Kofune and Haniwa, are born with sight. The trouble is, the very idea of sight is heretical — much like witchcraft in colonial America, troublesome people are accused of having the ability to see as justification for burning them alive. And there’s also an evil queen who learns of the twins, and as a religious zealot who worships the “darkness” (by, and I will testify to this in court if I have to, masturbating as she prays) she wants them brought to her for evil queen reasons.

A generous and forgiving read of See could interpret it as an attempted meditation on knowledge, ignorance, and responsibility, but See actively resists attempts to latch on to anything of substance it might have to offer. In the first three episodes made available in advance to critics, See is more interested in the logistics of its world than it is in implications.

Sometimes that leads to fun television. The third episode, the best of that initial bunch, is largely unconcerned with the season’s main arc, instead telling a story where Kofune is kidnapped by slavers and must be rescued. It’s visually striking, introducing a tribe of people that, unbeknownst to them, are living in the ruins of an amusement park. It’s got a killer fight scene, with unique choreography that clearly conveys the limitations and skills of everyone involved and depicts brutal violence with grace and skill. And it’s got personal stakes, which I won’t spoil here because it’s one of the only bits of character backstory you get in the first couple of episodes.

None of these things make See a more interesting show beyond the hour you spend watching them. It’s cotton candy, a fun confection for one moment, and just plain sugar the next.

See is clearly interested in drawing people into its elaborate and well-crafted post-apocalypse, but it’s telling that the only questions I have after watching are purely pedantic ones. Like how did a blind society make such perfect and deadly weapons, or build homes that never leak, or clothes and makeup that look so nice?

These are questions asked by jerks and spoilsports, and I wish I had better ones to ask of See. The show is strange, but fails to justify that strangeness with a compelling story, characters, or literally anything other than the list of ideas you and your stoned cousin would come up with if you wondered what it would be like if we all woke up one day totally blind, man. Maybe you’ll come up with something fun enough for posting on Twitter, but it’s not going to cut it for eight hours of television.

All Apple TV Plus shows are available to . The service costs $4.99 a month.

Related posts

Should Netflix and Hulu give you emergency alerts?

news

New York (CNN Business)The federal emergency alert program was designed decades ago to interrupt your TV show or radio station and warn about impending danger from severe weather events to acts of war.

“More and more people are opting out of the traditional television services,” said Gregory Touhill, a cybersecurity expert who served at the Department of Homeland security and was the first-ever Federal Chief Information Security Officer. “There’s a huge population out there that needs to help us rethink how we do this.”

Possible vs. practical

    Adding federal alerts to those platforms might not entirely be a technical issue, at least on the government’s end. The service has already been updated to include smartphones.
    tech
    And FEMA, the agency that manages the system’s technology, told CNN Business that there are “no known technical hurdles involved in transmitting alerts” to devices that are connected to the internet. In fact, the agency has a way to do that, according to a FEMA spokesperson.
    But a new tool would need to be developed to distribute alert information to streaming platforms. FEMA said the “unknown quantity” is figuring out who would develop and install the applications.
    That’s not a simple task, said Touhill, who’s now president of the cybersecurity firm Cyxtera Federal Group. He told CNN Business that the required tool would need to be “exquisitely complex.” It would need to be thoroughly tested and safeguarded to ensure that only authorized parties have access.
    “Is it possible? Yes. Is it practical? Maybe not,” Touhill told CNN Business.
    Another concern is whether devices connected to the internet are reliable indicators of a person’s location. Emergency alerts need to be able to target a specific area so that they only reach people who are at risk.
    People on the internet can be traced through their IP addresses — unique strings of numbers assigned to each device that are also associated with a specific set of geographic coordinates. That’s how companies like Netflix determine which language and content to show its customers.
    But those locations can be unreliable or easily manipulated, Touhill said.
    It’s also not clear that enough information is there in some cases. A source familiar with Netflix’s thinking told CNN Business that the company’s ability to pinpoint a customer’s exact location may vary depending on that person’s internet service provider. That means Netflix might not reliably know a person’s location with enough specificity to provide effective emergency alerts.
    Congress has considered some of these issues. Hawaii Senator Brian Schatz, a Democrat, proposed a bill last year that called for authorities to look into the feasibility of adding streaming services to the federal emergency alert system.
    The READI Act received bipartisan support and passed the Senate, but it died in the House. Schatz’s office told CNN Business this week that he plans to refile the bill for the current Congress.

    How to improve

    Adding streaming platforms to the alert system “is not a bad idea,” said National Weather Service senior meteorologist Kevin Laws.
    Laws is based in Birmingham and was part of a team that issued warnings to residents when tornadoes struck Alabama last Sunday. His team watches storms on a radar, and their predictions are automatically routed to FEMA’s alert system.
    But upgrades to the system are expensive and slow. Instead, Laws said he thinks alerts would be better helped through improvements to the type of information that authorities can share when a storm is in the area.
    Why you don't see emergency alerts when you're watching Netflix or playing Fortnite - CNN
    His ideal scenario? A day when storms are tracked automatically and alerts are consistently updated to show residents percentage of the likelihood that they will be affected.
    Such a feature would have helped last Sunday, he said, when some storms were particularly strong and unpredictable. Some parts of Alabama received emergency warnings more than half an hour before they were hit. But when a deadly tornado unexpectedly veered toward Lee County, where the death toll reached 23 people, locals were only notified about nine minutes beforehand.
      “I’ve spent many tearful days out there doing this job. And it kills me a little more every time,” Laws said, adding that disasters like the one that hit the state will happen again.
      “We have to keep improving the system,” he said.

      Related posts

      Where do babies come from? How to answer childrens 10 most vexing questions

      Parents are queried as many as 55 times a day by their kids in the school holidays, a survey says. Here are some considered responses to the most popular lines of inquiry

      Parents are asked as many as 55 questions a day by their children over the school holidays, a survey conducted by the childrens TV show Daisy & Ollie estimates. They include everything from philosophical queries to badgering. Here, the top 10 are answered as honestly as possible, while minimising the possibility of follow-up questions.

      Why?

      Your question may be understood in two ways. If you are asking about the purpose of existence, the meaning of life and the reason any of us are here, the answer is simple: we are here by mistake. If, as I suspect, your question is related to circumstance, as in: Why do I have to wear clothes in Tesco? the answer is also simple: because I said so.

      Are we nearly there yet?

      Allow me to point out your mistake: you have not named a destination; you just said there. We are always nearly somewhere, which is why its not a lie when I answer Yes, nearly every time you ask.

      Why cant I stay up late?

      Little
      Its growing time! (Posed by model.) Photograph: kwanchaichaiudom/Getty Images/iStockphoto

      The real reason is because I need three hours at the end of every day where I dont have to answer your questions. But I was worried you might repeat that to your teacher, so I made up the thing about how you only grow when you are asleep.

      Why do I have to go to school?

      You cant blame me for this its the law. I voted for the guy who wanted to ban school, but he lost. Fingers crossed for the next election.

      Why do I have to go to bed?

      I recognise this as a canny effort to rephrase question three in the hope of getting a more satisfactory answer. But all I have for you on this occasion is a final warning from Santas office.

      How come youre allowed that and Im not?

      Related posts