In the ground and off the page: why we’re banning ads from fossil fuels extractors | Membership | The Guardian

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In a bid to reduce our carbon footprint, confront greenwashing and increase our focus on the climate crisis, the Guardian this week announced it will no longer run ads from fossil fuel extractors alongside any of its content in print or online. The move will come into immediate effect, and follows the announcement in October last year that we intend to reduce our net emissions to zero by 2030.

Once upon a time, a newspaper was a rather straightforward business. You generated enough material of interest to attract a significant number of readers. You then ‘sold’ those readers to advertisers happy to pay to get their ideas, products or brands in front of consumers with cash to spend.

Of course, digital disruption over the past 20 years has upended that model, but advertising remains an important part of the media business ecosystem. At the Guardian, it is still responsible for about two-fifths of our income.

But what happens when the readers don’t like the adverts? What do you do when the message that advertisers want to spread jars awkwardly with the work your journalists are doing?

What if your journalists are some of the best in the world at revealing and investigating the deepening climate catastrophe and the disaster that is fossil fuel growth, while some of your advertisers are the very people digging the stuff out of the ground?

This contradiction has bothered us – and some of you – for some time. We came up with a rather bold answer this week: turn away the money and double down on the journalism.

“It’s something we thought about for a long time,” says Anna Bateson, the interim chief executive officer of Guardian Media Group, the Guardian’s parent company. “We always felt it was in line with our editorial values but were cautious for commercial reasons.”

She said it was the logical next step after the Guardian committed last year to becoming carbon neutral by 2030 and was certified as a B Corp – a company that puts purpose before profit. But she added that the move had to be weighed carefully, given the fact that the Guardian only recently returned to breakeven after years in the red.

“You have to be careful you are not making cavalier decisions,” she said. “ We are still having to fight for our financial future. But because of the support we get from our readers, it is less of a risk.”

On the advertising side of our business, Adam Foley said there were no complaints at all that potential customers were suddenly off-limits, adding that staff felt that “being part of a company that shares their values” was the biggest motivation for his teams.

“A statement like this reaffirms to all of us that we’re contributing to a business that really lives those values – to the extent where it is prepared to sacrifice profit for purpose.”

The response from the wider world has been a pleasant surprise. Hundreds of you have written in, pledging your support, and in some cases, one-off contributions to start making up the shortfall. (EDS: See below – I’m going to append the best responses below. In print you can use as the panel)

The environmental movement was instantly appreciative, with activists quickly urging our peers to follow suit. “The Guardian will no longer accept advertising from oil and gas companies,” Greta Thunberg tweeted. “A good start, who will take this further?” Greenpeace called it “a huge moment in the battle against oil and gas for all of us.”

Some readers have been calling for the Guardian to go the whole hog and forsake advertising from any company with a substantial carbon footprint. Bateson said that was not realistic, adding that such a move would result in less money for journalism. She said the fossil fuel extractors were specifically targeted because of their efforts to skew the climate change debate through their lobbying effort.

“We are committed to advertising,” she said. “It will continue to be part of our future. We want advertisers who want to be appear alongside our high quality journalism.”

And how will we know if this has worked?
“We will listen to our readers, we will listen to our advertisers. The response so far has been gratifying. If we continue to hear positive noises from our readers and supporters, then it will have been a success.”




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Responses from our supporters

That is such a brilliant decision and it will be tough, but it is the correct one and I am very proud of The Guardian. Barbara Syer

Following the Guardian’s decision to ban ads from fossil fuel companies I’m making a monthly contribution to support its fearless journalism: reader support is essential for independent scrutiny of the powerful in business, finance and politics. Titus Alexander, Hertfordshire, England

I live at present in Canada, home to the Alberta Tar Sands: another name for ecological devastation resulting from fossil fuel extraction. I fully support The Guardian’s action in ceasing to be a vehicle for advertising by fossil fuel extractive companies, and I’m proud to be a supporter. My monthly donation is small, but when I can I will make it much greater. Rosemary Delnavine, Canada

Congratulations. At this time it may be a bold step, indeed, within this industry, but true leaders have to take bold steps for the betterment of the quality of life, and more importantly for the life of future generations. I applaud this decision, and will spread the word. Raphael Sulkovitz, Boston MA

What a bravery! This is what the life on earth needs, thank you. Karri Kuikka, Finland (EDS: please leave her wonderful Finglish intact!)

Keep it up. Here in Canada, we’re still trying to have it both ways — sell the product internationally but discourage buying domestically. As I recall, it was the same with tobacco. Eventually, it took a change in public opinion to solve the problem. As a news source, your efforts are part of this solution. Robert Shotton, Ottawa

I applaud your decision to”walk the talk.” I will therefore continue to contribute to The Guardian. Bob Wagenseil

Bravo yr decision to eschew $ from the FFI. Please do continue to hold to the fire(s) the feet of the deniers and the willfully ignorant. Sydney Alonso, Vermont, US

I am very happy to hear that good news. It’s quite courageous on your part, and I’m happy to support you! Have a great year ahead, you’ll have my continuous support! Julien Psomas

I completely support your plan to refuse ads from fossils, despite the
financial hit to the Guardian. I have made a donation to help out. David Thompson

A very commendable decision, very much in keeping with the Guardian’s position as leader of green issues to leave a better planet for following generations. Richard Vernon, Oxford

Yay! I’m so proud of the Guardian! We can no longer support or fund in any manner the fossil fuel industry if we have any chance of survival as a civilization on this planet. You’ve taken a courageous and moral step that will hopefully embolden others to join you. Good on you! Best, Carol Ross, Missouri, US

Good decision. I’ll support you as much as I can, which unfortunately is not much as I live on age pension only. Keep up the good work, we need it desperately! Ursula Brandt, South Australia

I am absolutely delighted by this decision. So many people pledge to do something about Climate Change, but few actually are willing to get uncomfortable and DO it. I am very proud of you as my favourite source of Information and this only makes a case for me to donate next time to you again. Christiane Gross

It was great reading what The Guardian is doing re the climate. As a Guardian on-line reader from The Netherlands I’m going to contribute monthly now instead of ‘now and again’. The amount will be relatively small as I do not have a great income. I really hope more of your supporters will do so, because it is really great what you are doing.
With kind regards, Aleida Oostendorp, Netherlands

I congratulate you and your team on taking this step regarding fossil fuel companies. The Guardian’s stance on the environment and its excellent coverage of related stories and events is the major reason for my support. Well done, and good luck in the future. Deirdre Moore

Love your new policy about accepting money from fossil fuels. Will contribute more to help make up for the shortfall. Todd Misk

I live on a fixed income with a strict budget so my continuing support of your excellent news organisation represents my commitment to the fight to address climate change. Every step counts. Barbara Hirsch, Texas, US

Only when we speak truth to power can change take place. thank yo for your courageous and expensive decision. Nancy Shepherd, Vermont, US

Love your journalism, especially your investigative work and the climate change topic. And with the bold statement about not receiving any more sponsorship from the fossil extracting companies? Well, the already great newspapers became even more impressive now. Keep up the good work. Miroslav Řezníček, Czech Republic

Thank you for taking the bold step of refusing advertising from fossil fuel extractive companies. I think it is the right thing to do & hope many more companies do the same. We must all work together if we want to save our planet. It is one of the most important issues of our times. Ginger Comstock, New York, US

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California church nativity scene depicts Jesus, Mary and Joseph as refugees separated in cages

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A California church is displaying a nativity scene depicting Jesus, Mary and Joseph as refugees in cages to draw attention to the conditions faced by migrants seeking asylum in the United States. (Photo: Pastor Karen Clark Ristine/Claremont UMO/Facebook)

CLAREMONT, Calif. — A California church is displaying a nativity scene depicting Jesus, Mary and Joseph as refugees in cages to draw attention to the conditions faced by migrants seeking asylum in the United States.

The Claremont United Methodist Church, about 30 miles east of Los Angeles, posted the photo on its website showing the three held in separate cages topped with barbed wire. The baby Jesus is wrapped in a silver foil blanket.

“We thought about the most famous refugee family in the world, the family of Jesus,” lead pastor Karen Clark Ristine told KABC about the scene outside of the church.

In a Facebook post, Ristine said the display came from the idea of “What if this family sought refuge in our country today?”

The biblical story of Mary and Joseph fleeing from Israel to Egypt to escape King Herod’s decree that all baby boys be killed is symbolic of the plight of thousands of refugees seeking asylum in America, she said.

“In the Claremont United Methodist Church nativity scene this Christmas, the Holy Family takes the place of the thousands of nameless families separated at our borders,” Ristine said in the post.

“Imagine Joseph and Mary separated at the border and Jesus no older than two taken from his mother and placed behind the fences of a Border Patrol detention center as more than 5,500 children have been the past three years.”

“If this sparks conversation, that would be one good goal,” Ristine told KABC.

Commenters on the Facebook post were sharply divided.

“It is disrespectful in my view to put the King of Kings, Lord of Lords in a cage at any time. Your political views should not be mixed with the birth of our savior. Shame on you!” wrote one user.

Another thought the scene was a very powerful display.

“Does the world’s most famous and worshipped refugees separated in cages make you uncomfortable USA? … it does? … Good!”

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IDF maps home of Dolev terrorist bombmaker ahead of demolition | The Times of Israel

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Israeli security forces on Thursday made preparations for the demolition of the home of a Palestinian man suspected of helping carry out a deadly terror bombing this summer that killed a teenage Israeli girl and injured her father and brother, the military said.

Qassem a-Karim Rajah Shibli was part of a terror cell that is believed to have planted and detonated a bomb at a natural spring outside the Dolev settlement in the central West Bank on August 23. The blast killed Rina Shnerb, 17, and seriously injured her father, Rabbi Eitan Shnerb, and her brother, Dvir.

In the following weeks, the Israel Defense Forces and Shin Bet security service arrested four members of the cell, including its alleged ringleader, Samer Mina Salim Arbid, 44.

Shibli, 25, is suspected of helping make the bomb, according to the Shin Bet.

Rina Shnerb, 17, who was killed in a terror attack in the West Bank on August 23, 2019 (courtesy)

In the predawn hours of Thursday morning, Israeli troops measured Shibli’s home — the first step before its eventual demolition — in the Palestinian village of Kobar, northwest of Ramallah.

“The IDF will continue to act to prevent terror in Judea and Samaria,” the military said in a statement, using the biblical term for the West Bank.

Israel says the practice of demolishing terrorists’ homes is an effective means of discouraging future attacks, though it has been criticized by human rights groups as a form of collective punishment and by some analysts as an ineffective deterrent measure.

A short time after the arrests of the cell members were announced in September, it was reported that Arbid had been taken to Jerusalem’s Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus in critical condition following his interrogation by the Shin Bet.

Samer Arbid, the suspected ringleader of a terror cell believed to be behind a deadly bombing attack that killed Israeli teenager Rina Shnerb in August 2019, in an undated photograph. (Twitter)

He was due to be released from the hospital shortly, approximately a month and a half after he was admitted, the Walla news site reported Thursday.

The IDF said troops conducted arrest raids throughout the West Bank overnight, detaining 11 Palestinian suspects, who are believed to have taken part in terrorist activities, rock throwing or rioting.

The military said it also seized “thousands of shekels of terror funds” from Shibli’s hometown of Kobar and the Palestinian city of Tulkarem in the northern West Bank.

“This action was done as part of the campaign against terror funding,” the IDF said.

Last month, security forces also prepared to demolish the home of another member of the terror cell behind the Dolev bombing, 25-year-old Yasan Hasin Hasni Majamas in the town of Bir Zeit, outside Ramallah.

The Shin Bet security service said Arbid, Shibli, Majamas and Nizam Sami Yousef Ulad Mahmoud, 21, were members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) terror group and were planning additional attacks when they were arrested.

Mourners carry the body of 17-year-old Israeli Rina Shnerb, who was killed by a bomb in a terror attack while visiting a spring near Dolev in the West Bank, during her funeral in the city of Lod on August 23, 2019. (Jack Guez/AFP)

Arbid was brought to Jerusalem’s Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus in late September in critical condition, with severe internal injures, including broken ribs and kidney failure. He regained consciousness on October 15, but remained hospitalized due to this injuries.

Arbid’s attorney, Mahmoud Hassan, petitioned the court for his release last month, arguing that his client had “undergone severe torture” while in Israeli custody. The court denied the request, and ruled that due to the improvement in Arbid’s condition, the Shin Bet could resume interrogating him.

According to security sources, the Shin Bet was given permission to employ “extraordinary measures” during the interrogation that led to his hospitalization. Such measures can include beatings, forcing prisoners into uncomfortable positions, sleep deprivation, shackling and subjecting prisoners to extreme temperatures.

This is typically allowed in “ticking time bomb” cases where there is concern the suspect could provide security forces with information that could prevent an imminent attack.

The Justice Ministry launched an investigation into Arbid’s injuries, specifically probing the degree of force along with the tactics used by the Shin Bet interrogators.

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

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California real estate agent attack spurs more reports from alleged victims

California real estate agent attack suspect arrested - CNN

Los Angeles (CNN)In the hours after a Los Angeles-area man was arrested for allegedly assaulting a California real estate agent during an open house, more people have reported attacks to authorities, police said Wednesday.

The suspect was also arrested for multiple counts of sexual battery related to additional crimes already being investigated, a police spokesman said.
It was not immediately clear whether Karaboghosian, a resident of Encino, has a lawyer. He has not yet appeared in court.
    The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office does not yet have the case, according to spokesman Ricardo Santiago.

    Agent attacked outside front door

    The real estate agent was at an open house Sunday in Encino when the suspect approached her, police said in a news release.
    Surveillance footage shows the two talking outside the front door. The man’s face can be seen as he removes his hat and looks into the camera. Then, after shaking her hand, the video shows the man pushing her to the ground and running to stand over her.
    The video does not show what he did when she was on the ground. The woman said the man fled the scene.
    The woman sustained minor injuries to her leg, but she told CNN affiliate KCAL she might have suffered much worse if not for her screaming.
    “I think he would have raped me, that’s No. 1, and he would have killed me,” she told the station.
    The agent said she had seen the man before.
    She told KCAL he had come to an open house she hosted and that something in her gut warned her that he was dangerous.
    “I had a feeling from Day One that this person can hurt me,” she said.
    Because of that feeling, she asked a friend to stay with her during Sunday’s open house. But once that friend left, the man arrived, KCAL reported.
    Feeling uncomfortable, she directed her conversation with him to the porch, the station reported. She said the man asked her to show him the closets, to get him a water and to use the bathroom, but she declined to go in the house with him.
    She says she does not know if she will continue to work as a real estate after the attack. CNN does not publish the names of sexual assault victims who request anonymity.
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    The real estate agent was injured with bruises and cuts during the incident but is OK, her manager, Bob Siegmeth from Keller Williams Realty in Porter Ranch, said.
    It’s been traumatic for her, Siegmeth added.
      CNN has contacted the real estate agent but she said she was not ready to comment.
      After video of the attack was shown on television, several people have come forward to report being the victim of a physical or sexual assault by the same man, police said.

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      Yes, you need to talk to your kids about porn. Here’s how to do it

      Health

      (CNN)At a certain age, every kid learns about the difference between fantasy and reality, whether it applies to fairy tales, video games or superhero movies.

      For the generations who’ve never lived without Wi-Fi, the internet is often the first place they’re exposed to sexual imagery. And in the absence of good, comprehensive sex education, some kids may think it’s the only way to actually learn about sex.
      “The sad fact is that more than half of our children get their first ‘sexual education’ from adult films on the internet,” said Dr. Mark Schoen, founder of SexSmartFilms.com and former director of sex education at the Sinclair Intimacy Institute. What’s missing is a sense of context and conversation around this imagery — a conversation that would help a young person distinguish between real sex and porn sex.
        Although many sex educators are advocating for this kind of porn literacy in schools, the conversation also needs to happen at home.
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        In general, there can be real benefits from having frank discussions about sex, said Debby Herbenick. In one recent study by Herbenick and her colleagues at the Indiana University School of Public Health, exposure to porn was only associated with an increased probability in having unprotected sex when parents had little-to-no sexual health communication with their children. When parent-teen sexual health communication was high, pornography use was unrelated to teenagers’ engagement in unsafe sex.
        Here’s how to approach “the talk” in the age of online porn.

        Start early

        “Parents would be wise to start discussing sexually explicit media during childhood,” said Herbenick. “It’s not just porn that they need literacy about — it’s Hollywood movies, music and social media, too.”
        Rather than viewing access to porn as a negative, welcome it as an opportunity to educate your kids. “In my experience, the more sex ed a child receives from their parents, the less likely they are to develop shame around sex and use pornography in a compulsive or unhealthy manner,” said sex therapist Kimberly Resnick Anderson.

        Just do it

        Yes

          Teens make the case for porn literacy

        “Starting the conversation can be as easy as saying something like, ‘I know this might seem like it’s coming out of nowhere, but I’m concerned about the messages you are getting about sex, sexual behaviors and what’s real or normal from the stuff that’s out there,'” said sexologist Lanae St. John.
        Or you might do some advance planning. “A conversation on sex and porn should allow for honesty and the time it takes to have a serious discussion,” advised sex therapist Heidi Crockett. “I recommend arranging an agreed upon time so that both parent and child can bring their questions and thoughts to the table.”

        Explain the differences

        Remind your child that porn is meant for entertainment, not education, in terms they can understand.
        you need to talk to your kids about porn. Here's how to do it - CNN

          What it’s really like to be an adult film star

        “I tell them that just as the ‘Fast & Furious’ movies are not driver’s ed, porn is not sex ed,” said St. John. Explain that just like movies, porn portrays how we might fantasize about things but not act on them.
        Likewise, you can stress that masturbation — to porn or otherwise — and sex are two different experiences. “It’s fun to text our friends or play video games with them online, but it’s another thing to hang out in person,” said sex therapist Kristen Lilla. “Porn can also be fun to watch, but it doesn’t mimic or replace real-life sex and relationships.”

        Don’t make assumptions

        Part of what makes porn tough to talk about is how divisive it’s become. You might hear from some adults that porn use has led to dependency, erectile dysfunction, fear of intimacy and other problems. For others, it’s simply part of a healthy sex life.
        The truth is that medical experts don’t know for certain whether porn use is truly responsible for all of the effects attributed to it; so far, there isn’t a clear scientific consensus around the influence of porn on the human adult brain, much less the teenage brain.
        Health
        While some experts say that porn is highly addictive, others say that the concept of true porn addiction isn’t supported by scientific evidence. Impulsive or compulsive porn use, this camp says, is usually a symptom of something else, such as depression or anxiety.
        The only thing we do know for certain is that the more open parents are with their kids about sexual health, the better.

        Don’t limit it to sex

        View your conversations as laying the foundation for helping children question all the media they consume.
          “We begin this process of becoming aware of how roles or stereotypes are portrayed when you watch TV or PG movies with your kids beginning when they’re 7 to 8 years old,” said sex therapist Sari Cooper. “Bringing up some of the uncomfortable feelings one has when watching a film with younger ages because of the way a woman, person of color, or a person with disability was portrayed begins a training of critical thinking with your children.”
          However you choose to approach it, know that “the talk” is really a series of conversations. When you discuss topics like sexuality, masturbation and porn early on, you open the door for trust and honesty with your kids — and that helps build a foundation for good sexual health throughout their lives.

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          Reagan’s racist call with Nixon echoes strongly today

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          (CNN)The release by the National Archives of a racist telephone conversation between President Richard Nixon and future President Ronald Reagan (then-governor of California) casts a strobe light on an uncomfortable fact: One of our most popular Presidents was far from the only commander-in-chief to display racial bigotry.

          opinions
          Nixon, whose own enmity towards African Americans helped propel him to the White House as the coded champion of “law and order,” used Reagan’s words on the call to offer his own distaste for African leaders who dared challenge the West on geopolitical matters.
          If all of this sounds depressingly familiar, it should. President Donald Trump’s tenure in the White House remains most notable for his consistent attacks on black and brown people, Americans and global citizens through rhetoric that has demonized and dehumanized entire populations, countries, regions and cities, with the city of Baltimore being only the latest target.
            Reagan's racist call with Nixon echoes strongly today (opinion) - CNN
            For some, Reagan’s words will come as a surprise. Ronald Reagan, America’s 40th President, is perhaps most fondly remembered as the former B-movie actor turned swaggering hero of the conservative right. But it shouldn’t be a surprise.
            In the 1960s Reagan tried to suppress teaching and protests by figures on the black left like Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver and student protesters at San Francisco State and elsewhere. He also famously supported a ban on open carry for loaded firearms as governor of California (only after the Black Panthers publicly asserted their right to armed self-defense) and in the 1970s he introduced the racially toxic phrase “welfare queen” into the lexicon of American politics.
            If Richard Nixon opened up the Pandora’s box of racially coded political rhetoric that cemented the Republican Party’s “Southern strategy” of appealing to white voters turned off by the talk of civil rights, busing, and urban rebellion, Reagan offered the entire nation a telegenic icon who professed to have no public feelings of racial animus but an unflinching love for American exceptionalism and all of its accoutrements.
            news
            Reagan’s racial politics proved to be both substantive and symbolic. His 1980 campaign appearance in Neshoba County, Mississippi (near the site of the notorious murders of civil rights activists Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, and James Chaney in 1964) signaled to white voters where his allegiance lay on matters of racial justice. The Reagan Revolution’s reliance on trickle-down economics, promotion of the Drug War in urban communities, and policy assault on the Great Society devastated poor black and brown communities who were unable to participate in the booming economy of the 1980s.
              Perhaps most infamously, Reagan inspired a new generation of political conservatives (from religious Christians to think-tank academic ideologues to federal judges) who argued and struck down legal and legislative remedies that sought to promote racial justice in American democratic institutions. Appointing future Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to the head the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission proved the tip of the iceberg for the Reagan administration’s civil rights policies, which found the White House on the wrong side of virtually every single racial justice issue (from crime policy to racial apartheid in South Africa) except for one. Reagan signed the Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday into law in 1983 well aware that any veto would have been overridden by Congress. The national embrace of King during the 1980s under a President whose policies were antithetical to the civil rights leaders’ greatest political commitments and boldest dreams reflects an ever-present tension between race and democracy in America.

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              Whereas Reagan symbolically demonstrated his attention to the legacy of racial injustice through the passage of the King holiday, Donald Trump has gone in an entirely different direction. President Trump’s recent visit to Jamestown, Virginia, where he extolled the virtues of democracy while virtually ignoring the labor of enslaved Africans who made colonial North America and its evolution into the United States possible, offers us the opportunity to re-examine the often fraught relationship between race and the presidency. Trump neither possesses President Nixon’s voracious political instincts nor President Reagan’s public air of dignified elegance — yet all three have more in common on race matters than many would care to admit.

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