Virus death rate in London almost double other regions — with poorest hit the hardest, ONS analysis shows | London Evening Standard

person

The latest headlines in your inbox twice a day Monday – Friday plus breaking news updates




Please enter an email address
Email address is invalid
Fill out this field
Email address is invalid
You already have an account. Please log in.





The devastating impact of coronavirus on London as it swept through deprived communities is laid bare today.

New figures show the death rate in the capital per 100,000 people is almost double any other region. The 11 hardest- hit areas in the country were all in London, according to the analysis by the Office for National Statistics.

Newham had the highest age-standardised mortality rate with 144.3 deaths per 100,000 population, followed by Brent 141.5 deaths, and Hackney 127.4.

Nick Stripe, head of health analysis and life events at the ONS, said: “By mid-April, the region with the highest proportion of deaths involving Covid-19 was London, with the virus being involved in more than 4 in 10 deaths since the start of March.

“The 11 local authorities with the highest mortality rates were all London boroughs, with Newham, Brent and Hackney suffering the highest rates of Covid-19-related deaths.

“People living in more deprived areas have experienced Covid-19 mortality rates more than double those living in less deprived areas.”

The figures were published as the Government is facing growing accusations that it was too slow in ordering the lockdown, despite warnings from Italy about the threat from coronavirus.

The capital saw the number of cases soar far quicker than other regions and more than 5,000 people have now died with coronavirus in London’s hospitals — with hundreds more in care homes.

Mayor Sadiq Khan said: “Coronavirus is not the great-leveller. It is hitting people from minority ethnicities and more deprived communities more than anywhere else.” The ONS analysed nearly 20,300 deaths involving Covid-19 in England and Wales between March  1 and April 17.

It revealed huge differences between some of London’s poorest and more ethnically diverse areas and those that are more prosperous, heightening concern about the different death rates.

Read more

Newham with 208 deaths, Brent, 304, Hackney, 146, Haringey, 168, and Tower Hamlets, 132, all had age-standardised fatality rates above 100 per 100,000 residents. By contrast, the death rate in Kingston upon Thames was 42.9, representing 57 deaths, while in Richmond the death rate stood at 47 after 77 deaths, a similar rate to Bromley, with 152 deaths.

The figures are age-standardised. Age-standardised figures are used to make fair comparisons between boroughs, regardless of the actual age of their residents.

The way London’s most diverse boroughs have been hit by Covid-19 is also illustrated by the deaths at each hospital trust.

London North West Healthcare, which takes most of its patients from Brent, Harrow and Ealing, has the highest death toll in London — 488 to date.

London portraits during the Coronavirus lockdown

Barts Health, which has five hospitals serving Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham, has recorded 388 deaths. There have been 127 deaths at Homerton hospital in Hackney.

The overall rate for London was 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people, almost double the next highest which was the West Midlands, at 43.2, with the South-West the lowest on 16.4.

The grim data came as boroughs faced calls to widen pavements and temporarily carve space for segregated cycle routes to enable Londoners to maintain social distancing.

A UCL study found two thirds of pavements in the capital were not wide enough for pedestrians to stay 2m apart, as required by the Government’s social distancing rules. Only 36 per cent of pavements in Greater London were at least 3m wide — judged to be the minimum required for people to be able to keep their distance.

Dr Ashley Dhanani, of The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, said: “Most streets in London have pavements which are just over 2m wide — this is not enough room for people to pass each other and leave 2m distance between them, especially with obstacles such as bins, trees and lampposts.

“While some may opt to walk in the road, this is not possible for people with pushchairs or with mobility impairments. This research shows there is an urgent need to reallocate street space in London so everyone can use streets safely. A lack of space for walking and cycling is also a long-term problem.”

Boroughs such as Haringey, Hackney and Sutton have begun to create wider pavements and temporary cycle lanes by placing traffic cones in the road.

With many commuters expected to shun the Tube and buses once lockdown is lifted, Transport for London says it plans to introduce temporary cycle lanes on its main roads.

Please be respectful when making a comment and adhere to our Community Guidelines.

Community Guidelines

You can find our Community Guidelines in full
here.

Loading comments…
There are no comments yet

{{/comments}}

Related posts

More than 7,000 people test positive for coronavirus in Wales as latest death toll is announced – North Wales Live

person
Thank you for subscribingSee ourprivacy notice

A further 41 people have died after testing positive for coronavirus in Wales, bringing the total number to 575.

Public Health Wales today recorded 334 new known cases, meaning 7,270 people have tested positive for the disease in Wales, although the actual number is likely to be much higher.

Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board has 62 new cases, bringing the total number to 741 in North Wales.

Since the outbreak began, 45 people have now tested positive in Anglesey, 105 in Conwy, 161 in Denbighshire, 157 in Flintshire, 130 in Gwynedd and 143 in Wrexham.

Dr Robin Howe, Incident Director for the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak response at Public Health Wales, said: “Public Health Wales continues to fully support the extension of lockdown measures, which is essential to avoid reversing the gains we have made in slowing the spread of this virus, protecting our NHS, and saving lives.

“Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) is still circulating in every part of Wales, and the single most important action we can all take in fighting the virus is to stay at home. We want to thank each and every person across Wales for doing their bit to help slow the spread of the virus.

“While emphasising the importance of staying at home, we also want to reinforce the message from NHS Wales that urgent and emergency care services for physical and mental health are still open and accessible.

“For parents, if your child is unwell and you are concerned you should seek help. If you have urgent dental pain you should still call your dentist. If you have a health complaint that is worrying you and won’t go away, you should call your GP practice. If you or a family member are seriously ill or injured, you should dial 999 or attend your nearest Emergency Department.

“Public Health Wales is working with our partners in Welsh Government, the wider NHS in Wales, the other UK nations and others to monitor and respond to the spread of Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Wales.

“This includes working with the Welsh Government on its review of testing for COVID-19, and we welcome its latest recommendations in the critical workers testing policy, published today. It is vital to ensure we test the right people, at the right time, in the right place, to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

“We are encouraging everyone to download the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker app, which has been supported by the Welsh Government. The app allows users to log daily symptoms to help build a clearer picture of how the virus is affecting people. For more information, including how to download the app, visit covid.joinzoe.com.

“Public Health Wales is working to address the negative impact of COVID-19 on the social, mental and physical wellbeing of people in Wales. The new How are you doing? The campaign is now live and offering practical advice from phw.nhs.wales/howareyoudoing.

“We know that staying at home can be hard especially when the weather is nice, but members of the public must adhere to social distancing rules about staying at home, and away from others, introduced by the UK and Welsh Government. These rules are available on the Public Health Wales website.

“People no longer need to contact NHS 111 if they think they may have contracted Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). Information about the symptoms to look out for is available on the Public Health Wales website, or members of the public can use the NHS Wales, symptom checker.

Send a heart to our #NHSheroes

It is something that has, at some point, touched all our lives.

From cradle to grave, the National Health Service, and the incredible professionals within it who care for us, is a part of British life.

Today, more than ever, we should cherish those who dedicate themselves to our care, heedless of their own health as they work tirelessly to care for people in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.

Nurses and others – employed by the NHS and any other part of health and care – we have never needed them more.

So let’s show them some love, and create a living map of gratitude from every corner of Britain.

Click HERE to drop a heart on the map, and show you appreciate the efforts undertaken daily in the NHS.

Thanks a million, NHS workers – we love you.

“Anyone with a suspected coronavirus illness should not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. They should only contact NHS 111 if they feel they cannot cope with their symptoms at home, their condition gets worse, or their symptoms do not get better after seven days.

“Only call 999 if you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, do not call 999 just because you are on hold to 111. We appreciate that 111 lines are busy, but you will get through after a wait. “Only call 999 if you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, do not call 999 just because you are on hold to 111. We appreciate that 111 lines are busy, but you will get through after a wait.

Join us in showing your support and sending a heart to the NHS heroes where you live by visiting the thanksamillionsnhs website

Related posts

Mitch Cronin death: Rugby league player dies after backyard training accident during lockdown | The Independent

person sports ball

Australian rugby league player Mitch Cronin, a Queensland Cup grand final captain, has died after a training accident in his garden, aged 27.

Cronin was found by family members in the swimming pool of his back garden in Brisbane on Friday, having just completed a training workout under Australia’s lockdown restrictions.

It’s understood that the Wynnum Manly captain had carried out a weights session and went into the pool to cool down afterwards, where he is believed to have suffered a suspected heart attack. An autopsy will now be carried out to determine what happened to Cronin.

Download the new Independent Premium app

Sharing the full story, not just the headlines

The rugby league player spent time with NRL sides Canberra Raiders and Brisbane Broncos but did not make an appearance for the senior sides, but last year he skippered Wynnum Manly to the Queensland Cup grand final last September, where they suffered a 28-10 defeat against the Burleigh Bears.

Speaking to Australian outlet NewsCorp, Cronin’s manager, Paul Hogan, confirmed his death and said it was a “tragic loss of life”. 

“This has left Wynnum club, their players and myself totally shocked,” Hogan said. “He was an outstanding young man and my thoughts are with his family. We are all shattered.”

The QRL competitions manager, Dave Maiden, added. “He was a quality human being who will be mourned by many and missed by all. The people who came across him will be in a state of disbelief. He’s one of the good ones.”

Wynnum Manly chief executive, Hanan Laban, said in a statement: “We are devastated, and we send out love to Chris, Andrea, Ben, Amy and the Cronin family. 

“Mitch was an exceptional young man who was loved and respected by his teammates, his coaching staff, our supporters and the wider rugby league community.

“From the moment he arrived at Wynnum he embodied the values of the Seagulls through his positive attitude, strong work ethic, and deep care for his teammates and his club.”

Shape Created with Sketch.
Sporting deaths in 2020

1/9 David Stern, 77

Legendary former NBA commissioner David Stern died on New Year’s Day, having led the sport for 30 years between 1984 and 2014 (22 September 1942 – 1 January 2020)

2/9 Kobe Bryant, 41

NBA legend Kobe Bryant was killed in a helicopter crash along with his daughter, Gianna, and seven others (23 August 1978 – 26 January 2020).

3/9 Harry Gregg, 87

Former Manchester United and Northern Ireland goalkeeper, dubbed ‘the hero of Munich’ for his efforts in saving teammates and strangers in the Munich air disaster, died at the Causeway Hospital (27 October 1932 – 16 February 2020)

4/9 Mickey Wright, 85

Mickey Wright, who won an incredible 44 titles in the space of four years between 1961 and 1964 (14 February 1935 – 17 February 2020)
Former Wales rugby player Matthew Watkins died after a battle with cancer (2 September 1978 – 7 March 2020)

6/9 Roger Mayweather, 58

Ex-world champion boxer Roger Mayweather, who was also the uncle and former trainer of undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather (24 April 1961 – 17 March 2020)

7/9 Peter Whittingham, 35

Former Cardiff City and Premier League footballer Peter Whittingham died after suffering an accidental fall at a pub (8 September 1984 – 19 March 2020)

8/9 Radomir Antic, 71

Former Real Madrid, Atletico and Barcelona manager Radomir Antic died after suffering complications with pancreatitis (22 November 1948 – 6 April 2020)

9/9 Tarvaris Jackson, 36

Former Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks and Buffalo Bills quarterback died in a car crash in Alabama (21 April 1983 – 12 April 2020)

1/9 David Stern, 77

Legendary former NBA commissioner David Stern died on New Year’s Day, having led the sport for 30 years between 1984 and 2014 (22 September 1942 – 1 January 2020)

2/9 Kobe Bryant, 41

NBA legend Kobe Bryant was killed in a helicopter crash along with his daughter, Gianna, and seven others (23 August 1978 – 26 January 2020).

3/9 Harry Gregg, 87

Former Manchester United and Northern Ireland goalkeeper, dubbed ‘the hero of Munich’ for his efforts in saving teammates and strangers in the Munich air disaster, died at the Causeway Hospital (27 October 1932 – 16 February 2020)

4/9 Mickey Wright, 85

Mickey Wright, who won an incredible 44 titles in the space of four years between 1961 and 1964 (14 February 1935 – 17 February 2020)
Former Wales rugby player Matthew Watkins died after a battle with cancer (2 September 1978 – 7 March 2020)

6/9 Roger Mayweather, 58

Ex-world champion boxer Roger Mayweather, who was also the uncle and former trainer of undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather (24 April 1961 – 17 March 2020)

7/9 Peter Whittingham, 35

Former Cardiff City and Premier League footballer Peter Whittingham died after suffering an accidental fall at a pub (8 September 1984 – 19 March 2020)

8/9 Radomir Antic, 71

Former Real Madrid, Atletico and Barcelona manager Radomir Antic died after suffering complications with pancreatitis (22 November 1948 – 6 April 2020)

9/9 Tarvaris Jackson, 36

Former Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks and Buffalo Bills quarterback died in a car crash in Alabama (21 April 1983 – 12 April 2020)

A number of teammates and ex-colleagues have posted tributes on social media to Cronin. Ex-Raiders player Jordan Rapana, who played with Cronin, wrote: “Man I still don’t want to believe it! You got me through some of the toughest times of my life! I love you my brother, fly high you absolute legend, love you forever brother! Okioki teina… QUEENSLANDER!!!!”

Related posts

UK’s coronavirus death toll rises by 684 to 3,605 in biggest jump yet – Mirror Online

Thank you for subscribingWe have more newslettersShow meSee ourprivacy notice

The UK’s coronavirus death toll has soared to 3,605 after 684 patients died in just 24 hours – the biggest single day increase yet.

The figure does not include people who have died at home. The previous total stood at 2,921 deaths.

The number of confirmed cases has increased to 38,168 after 4,450 more people tested positive.

Most of the deaths have been in England (3,244), followed by Scotland (172), Wales (141) and Northern Ireland (48).

Two NHS nurses, who were both mothers in their 30s with three young children, are among the latest patients to die after battling Covid-19 in hospital.

The grim news came as Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who is back at work after battling the virus, said the Government expects the virus to peak in Britain in the next few weeks and Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who is still infected with Covid-19 and isolating, urged people to stick with social distancing in a bid to flatten the curve.

Have you been affected by coronavirus? Email webnews@mirror.co.uk.

Aimee O'Rourke

The Department of Health said: “As of 9am on 3 April 2020, 173,784 people have been tested, of which 38,168 were confirmed positive.

“As of 5pm on 2 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 3,605 have died.”

Public Health England said 11,764 tests were carried out on Thursday in England, while testing capacity for inpatient care in the country currently stands at 12,799 tests per day.

Two NHS nurses were among the latest patients to die.

BBC Radio 4

Mum-of-three Areema Nasreen, 36, was in intensive care on a ventilator after testing positive for the virus.

She worked at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

In Kent, Aimee O’Rourke, 38, died at the Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate, where she worked.

The mum-of-three was hailed as a “brave angel” as her family said in a tribute: “Aimee was a beautiful woman and a valued NHS nurse.”

Boris Johnson

More than 10,000 tests carried out

Friday’s figures from the Department of Health show that for the second day running more than 10,000 new people were tested in the UK for coronavirus.

A total of 10,590 new people were reported as being tested in the 24 hours to 9am April 3.

The equivalent figure for April 2 was 10,215.

The total number of people in the UK tested since the outbreak began is now 173,784.

This is the equivalent of around 261 people in every 100,000, or 0.3% of the population.

The number of coronavirus-related hospital deaths reported by the Department of Health stood at 3,605 as of 5pm April 2.

It took 19 days for this number to pass 300. It has taken further 11 days to pass 3,000.

Meanwhile, the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK has taken two weeks to go from just under 4,000 (3,983 as of 9am March 20) to just under 40,000 (38,168 as of 9am April 3).

Commenting on the death of Ms Nasreen, Mr Hancock said: “I pay tribute to the NHS staff who’ve died serving the NHS, serving the nation.

“It shows the incredible bravery of every member of the NHS who goes into work knowing that these dangers are there.

“I think it is a testament to every doctor and nurse and paramedic and other health professional who is working in the NHS in these difficult times.

“And I think the whole nation is grateful.”

About 35,000 front-line NHS staff are not currently in work due to coronavirus, said Mr Hancock.

He said testing figures for health staff “should” rise to thousands a day in the next few weeks.

The Government has set a goal of testing 100,000 people a day across the whole of the UK by the end of April following widespread criticism of its testing strategy.

The Prime Minister’s spokesman said the 5,000-plus NHS staff who had been tested had mainly been tested at new testing sites.

Health Secretary

A total of 172 patients have died in Scotland after testing positive for coronavirus, up by 46 from 126 on Thursday.

3,001 people have now tested positive for the virus in Scotland, up from 2,602 the day before.

Officials said 176 people are in intensive care with coronavirus or coronavirus symptoms, and increase of 14 on Thursday.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon warned: “I want to be very clear that nothing I have seen gives me any basis whatsoever for predicting the virus will peak as early as a week’s time here in Scotland.”

Video Loading

The video will start in8Cancel

Play now
Play now

A total of 24 patients have died after testing positive for coronavirus in Wales, bringing the total number of deaths in the country to 141, health officials said.

Public Health Wales said 345 new cases had tested positive for Covid-19, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in Wales to 2,466.

Dr Robin Howe, from Public Health Wales, said “345 new cases have tested positive for Covid-19 in Wales, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 2,466, although the true number of cases is likely to be higher”.

Dr Howe added: “Twenty-four further deaths have been reported to us of people who had tested positive for Covid-19, taking the number of deaths in Wales to 141.

Louisa Jordan

“We offer our condolences to families and friends affected, and we ask those reporting on the situation to respect patient confidentiality.”

The Welsh Government will introduce a law compelling all employers to make sure their workers keep two metres apart, Wales’ First Minister has said.

Mark Drakeford said the social distancing legislation, the first in the UK, would require bosses to “put the needs of their workforce first” when it comes into force on Monday or Tuesday of next week.

The number of people who have died in Northern Ireland after contracting coronavirus has risen by 12 to 48, health officials said.

Testing has resulted in 130 new positive cases, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in the region to 904.

Manchester's Central Complex

In England, two siblings of Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab, the 13-year-old London boy who died after testing positive for coronavirus, have also developed symptoms, according to a family friend who launched an online appeal.

The development means Ismail’s mother and six siblings are forced to self-isolate and cannot attend his funeral in Brixton on Friday, Mark Stephenson said.

Meanwhile, Prince Charles, who tested positive for coronavirus last month, officially opened the NHS Nightingale Hospital at the ExCeL centre in east London.

The Prince of Wales, 71, appeared via video-link from his Scottish home of Birkhall and spoke to those gathered at the entrance of the new temporary hospital.

He said: “It is without doubt a spectacular and almost unbelievable feat of work in every sense, from its speed of construction – in just nine days as we’ve heard – to its size and the skills of those who have created it.

Mark Stephenson

NHS Nightingale Hospital – the facts

The NHS Nightingale Hospital has been built in east London in the ExCel convention centre.

The facility will be used to treat Covid-19 patients transferred from intensive care units across London

Just one ward will need 200 members of staff

“An example, if ever one was needed, of how the impossible could be made possible and how we can achieve the unthinkable through human will and ingenuity.”

Charles added: “The creation of this hospital is above all the result of an extraordinary collaboration and partnership between NHS managers, the military and all those involved to create a centre on a scale that has never been seen before in the United Kingdom.

“To convert one of the largest national conference centres into a field hospital, starting with 500 beds with a potential of 4,000, is quite frankly incredible.”

The prince and Mr Hancock both recently ended self-isolation after contracting the virus and Charles commented on the fact they had recovered.

Read More

He said: “Now I was one of the lucky ones to have Covid-19 relatively mildly and if I may say so I’m so glad to see the Secretary of State has also recovered, but for some it will be a much harder journey.”

Shortly after he spoke, Buckingham Palace confirmed the Queen has recorded a special broadcast on the coronavirus outbreak to be broadcast on Sunday night.

Previously, it was said that the 93-year-old monarch, who is isolating with Prince Philip, 98, at Windsor Castle, was preparing to make a televised address to calm the nation’s nerves, but was waiting for the “right moment” to address the country.

Mr Hancock, meanwhile, praised all those involved in the setting up of the hospital, adding the “extraordinary project”, the core of which was completed in just nine days, was a “testament to the work and the brilliance of the many people involved”.

Matt Hancock

Show your support for our NHS heroes

We are building a map of appreciation for the NHS heroes looking after us through the coronavirus crisis. Place your heart on our live updating map at www.thanksamillionnhs.co.uk.

Add your partial postcode (eg: CF5 1) to put a heart on the map and you can add a thank you message too.

If you’re an NHS worker, you’ll also find a handy list of all the places and brands currently offering you well-deserved discounts.

Share the page to encourage others to show their support!

He also praised the NHS and the way its staff are dealing with the virus crisis.

The Health Secretary said: “In these troubled times with this invisible killer stalking the whole world, the fact that in this country we have the NHS is even more valuable than before.”

Asked about the number of ventilators currently in use and how many are expected to arrive next week, Mr Hancock said: “We’ve obviously got a big programme to ramp up the number of ventilators and we now have more ventilators than we had before.

“And we’re going to need them for this hospital and I’m just going to go and have a look at that now.”

Pressed for exact numbers, Mr Hancock did not respond.

Northern Ireland

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme earlier, Mr Hancock said it is unclear whether he is now immune to Covid-19.

He described having coronavirus as a “pretty unpleasant experience” with an “incredibly” sore throat and a feeling of “having glass in my throat”.

He said he has lost half a stone in weight.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson remained in isolation in Downing Street after testing positive for the virus.

He was “feeling better” but still had a fever on Friday.

nurse and paramedic

In a video on social media, the Prime Minister urged the public to stick with social distancing and not be tempted to “hang out” in the warmer weather predicted for this weekend.

“In my own case, although I’m feeling better and I’ve done my seven days of isolation, alas I still have one of the symptoms, a minor symptom, I still still have a temperature,” he said.

“So, in accordance with government advice I must continue my self-isolation until that symptom itself goes.”

Mr Johnson said people must not be tempted to break social distancing rules as the weather warms up even if they were going “a bit stir crazy”

In England, more than 26.7 million units of personal protection equipment (PPE) were delivered to 281 NHS “trusts and providers” on Thursday, Downing Street confirmed.

Prime Minister

Mr Johnson’s spokesman said: “That included 7.8 million aprons, 1.7 million masks and 12.4 million gloves.”

It follows the new guidance issued by Public Health England about the level of protection health staff should wear depending on the patient situation.

There would be no new guidance published on the public wearing masks or face coverings when out of the house, said the spokesman.

The spokesman said “surveillance” of the population to determine the spread of coronavirus was ongoing, with 3,500 antibody tests carried out per week.

“This is a population surveillance programme which we have been carrying out since February,” said the spokesman.

“It is being done by Public Health England at their campus which is at Porton Down.

“We currently have capacity for 3,500 of these surveillance tests to be carried out this week which is enough for small-scale population sampling.”

Two newly-planned temporary hospital sites have been agreed at the University of the West of England and the Harrogate Convention Centre.

They will join other sites due to open at Birmingham’s National Exhibition Centre and Manchester’s Central Complex.

Construction of a temporary hospital called the NHS Louisa Jordan is underway in Glasgow.

Related posts

So much for saying you want a quiet life, Meghan Markle | Stuff.co.nz

person

COMMENT: ​So Meghan Markle is reportedly attending the Met Gala in May. Because where better to celebrate your newfound privacy and “space” than at “the Oscars of the East Coast”, “the Super Bowl of red-carpet events”?

What could be more perfectly suited to anyone fleeing “intense scrutiny” and “commoditisation” than a mega-bash to which anti-commodification activist Kim Kardashian once turned up dressed in a nude-effect wet-look dress? A celebrity Pavlova, where the 225 photographers will take an estimated 50 shots a minute, before blasting millions of images out into the ether? Although why this is more appealing than a royal visit to the Mumbles Lifeboat station in South Wales is anyone’s guess.

Anthony Devlin
Has Meghan Markle lost the sympathy of the public?

According to sources at the weekend, Markle is to leave Prince Harry at home for the night, so “she can establish herself once more in Hollywood”, apparently attending the Met Gala with Vogue’s editor, Edward Enninful. This makes about as much sense as a woman who craves the quiet life asking her LA agent to find her a leading role in a superhero film, “something that pays big” – which is exactly what one Sunday paper claims Markle has done.

As the Sussexes fly back to Britain to complete their final engagements as working members of the Firm – and face the Royal family for the first time since The Statement, the petulant Instagram post from a fortnight ago in which they whined about being made to drop the “SussexRoyal” brand despite there being nothing legal to stop them using it – the pair may have no choice but to brazen it out.

I’m not sure the Sussexes will understand just how colossal a miscalculation that statement was. After all, you have a young man and his wife turning on a 93-year-old grandmother at one of the toughest moments of her life. You have them disregarding the pain and sadness prompted by Prince Philip’s ill health, Prince Andrew’s involvement with a paedophile and her beloved grandsons falling out – all because they have a brand to promote. Is there any way back from that?

Had you asked me a month ago, I would have said yes. Despite the acts of clumsiness and the missteps we’ve witnessed over the past two years, I would still have said yes. So they invited a bunch of A-listers that they’d only met once to their wedding. How many of us would do the same if we knew George and Amal would actually come? Was their dispensing of certain royal traditions really so bad? The insistence on Archie’s christening remaining private and the setting up of their own “breakaway” website?

Harry has always been his own person. At this point, one could still push a convincing narrative that these two were “breathing new life” into an outdated institution.

But the precise moment the couple began to lose the public’s sympathy wasn’t when they chose the hospitality of a billionaire in Vancouver Island over that of the Queen at Christmas, or indeed when they decided to make the desired “break from royal duties” permanent. No – that moment can be charted back to a lament the misty-eyed Duchess of Sussex made in the ITV documentary charting the couple’s African tour last year: “Not many people have asked if I’m OK.”

Because that single sentence managed to eclipse everything the couple were in southern Africa to highlight – from the 1,000 minefields that have yet to be cleared in Angola, to the abject poverty in Malawi and HIV-hit children in Botswana – and make it all about Markle.

Prince Harry Meghan Markle met with crowds when they visited Auckland.

It may be unfair to blame Meghan any more than Harry for these recent missteps. But one thing is certain: neither the words nor the sentiments in The Statement appear to be those of a happy young couple, revelling in the joy of each other and their nine-month-old baby.

And I worry that something is unravelling behind the scenes. Because if their intention were really to enjoy a quiet life, why would they care about a title that can only ever be used for professional profit and status?

Why would the team of LA-based agents, lawyers and publicists be necessary and the showbusiness parties and blockbuster film roles so appealing?

You don’t need those things or grand branding to live a serene and peaceful life. But solid family relationships? They’re essential.

Related posts

The horrendous letter Rev Richard Coles received after partner’s death – Wales Online

Thank you for subscribingWe have more newslettersShow meSee our privacy notice

The Reverend Richard Coles has thanked people for the messages of support he has received since announcing the death of his long-term partner.

But he has also shared some of the details of an unsigned letter that was sent to him saying, “Dear Mr Coles, I can’t begin to tell you how happy I am to hear of the death of your partner.”

He added: “The horrible letters: they don’t touch me. I am right now an expert in pain, the real kind, and these are paper darts among the incoming, and just leave me mildly curious about the state of mind of the writer.”

The former Strictly Come Dancing contestant, who was also in The Communards, shared the sad news of David Cole’s death “after a long illness” earlier this week.

Sharing a picture of them together, the 57-year-old wrote: “I’m very sorry to say that @RevDavidColes has died. He had been ill for a while

“Thanks to the brilliant teams who looked after him at @KettGeneral . Funeral details to follow.

“The Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended”.”

The couple met in 2007 when David approached Richard after he performed a sermon, and had been together ever since. They tied the knot in a civil partnership soon after, and have delighted followers online with tales of domestic life – as well as their family of dogs.

Since David’s death was announced, Richard said he had received lots of messages of “loveliness”, but some were not so nice.

He said: “99.99999% loveliness from people and then a small but lively correspondence from Christians who wish me to know that D is in hell and I will follow.

“It’s like the Khmer Rouge suddenly popping up in a stream of condolence.”

He also warned his followers about a scam gofund page that had been set up in David’s name.

Related posts

Anglican Archbishop Tells Gay Supporters To Leave The Anglican Church

“My own view is that if people wish to change the doctrine of our church, they should start a new church or join a church more aligned to their views,” he said. “But do not ruin the Anglican Church by abandoning the plain teaching of scripture.”

Anglican Archbishop-Glenn-Davies
Anglican Archbishop-Glenn-Davies

The blunt words of Sydney archbishop Glenn Davies come at a critical moment for Australian churches and demands for religious freedom

During his annual speech to the Anglican Church’s Sydney synod, Archbishop Glenn Davies told supporters of same-sex marriage to “please leave us”.

“My own view is that if people wish to change the doctrine of our church, they should start a new church or join a church more aligned to their views,” Davies said. “But do not ruin the Anglican Church by abandoning the plain teaching of scripture.”

In a report published on the Sydney Anglicans website, Davies’s media manager, Russell Powell, said the archbishop received a standing ovation at the end of his address – as indeed he had.

But in pockets of the hall, there was also discomfort, if not with the core sentiment then with the tone. For a man renowned for his civility, the language was considered blunt by many.

Davies has long been frustrated by what he believes is the excessive liberalism or tolerance of other Australian bishops towards same-sex relationships, particularly among clergy.

Now he watches as two relatively small parts of the church – the dioceses of Wangaratta in Victoria and Newcastle in New South Wales – are moving to bless same-sex marriages.

Pro-gay marriage Anglicans are walking a fine line in the Australian church. Some want a full marriage rite, such as the one that exists in the Episcopal Church of the US. Others, such as the members of the Wangaratta synod, have voted to bless same-sex marriages conducted under civil law. To Sydney’s “guardians” (their word) of orthodoxy, it is a distinction without difference.

One leading Sydney Anglican – supportive of but frustrated with Davies – could not work out if the archbishop’s call to “please leave” was a statement about “discipline within the church as opposed to grace outside it”. Was he simply insisting that bishops and priests stop agitating for the church to accommodate same-sex marriage? Or was the leader of Australia’s most powerful Anglican diocese, in an unusually intemperate spray, shunning gay Christians at the door of the church?

It took Davies four days to clarify that his imprecise comments were directed at the bishops, not the parishioners, but the hurt has been profound, especially for those working in Anglican education and social services.

This is a critical moment for Australia’s churches. They are attempting to persuade the federal government to accommodate their demands for greater religious freedom, including the right to hire staff whose lives accord to strict Biblical views of sex and sexuality. At the same time, they insist they welcome LGBT students into their schools and gay Australians to use their welfare services.

Continue reading this post on The Guardian.

The post Anglican Archbishop Tells Gay Supporters To Leave The Anglican Church appeared first on Believers Portal.

Related posts

Downton Abbey, like plantation houses, delivers fantasy over brute reality | Michael Henry Adams

The American south may seem a long way from the estates of England, but in both places a veil of caprice covers harsh truths

culture

The son of a Scottish immigrant who worked as a servant, Donald Trump could hardly wait for his banquet at Buckingham Palace. A seat next to Elizabeth II conferred a sense of accomplishment little else could.

To many, such behavior from an American president appeared downright unseemly. But how could we scoff? How else have so many of us been eagerly awaiting the return of Downton Abbey?

TV and film can be transporting, giving us glimpses of lives we can only imagine imperfectly. Decades before Julian Fellowes creation came forth to conquer America, PBS offered a steady diet of British clotted cream. Royals, aristocrats, castles, servants, sex. Such is the stuff of which Downton daydreams are made.

We make our own fantasies too. As a boy, watching Gone With the Wind, I saw plantation houses for which I thought I could sell my soul. It seemed such an alluring way of life.

No wonder people complain of being lectured about slavery when they visit Savannah or Charleston. They, like me, have imagined themselves in the masters place. No work to be done, fanned on white-pillared porches, sipping cooling drinks, pondering pleasures to come. Is it surprising so many, confronted by the nightmare behind the reverie, recoil in unacknowledged shame?

I came to this crossroads early, no longer able to overlook the anguish of my ancestors. I saw exquisite architecture and ideas of gracious hospitality but knew both to be built on the worst criminality.

Fortunately, thanks to green England, I was able to transfer my affections. The Forsyte Saga, Upstairs Downstairs, Brideshead Revisited, The Admirable Crichton. The Shooting Party, The Remains of the Day, Gosford Park. They became my refuge and taught me much. Entranced by an elegant aesthetic, reading countless books, even attending the Attingham Summer School to study famous country houses, I sought an elusive loveliness, untroubled by oppression.

I know I never escaped. I had only embraced a new quagmire of contradictory caprice.

At the very lightest level, all this means I know that Downton the whole phenomenon, the TV series, the film, the traveling exhibition, the merchandising is a ludicrous and ahistorical fancy.

I know, for example, that contrary to what we see on Fellowes screen, non-royal butlers did not wear white waistcoats and that waiters did not wear dinner jackets at all. I know ladies were never gloved while drinking or eating, candles were never used on a luncheon table and candle shades, now found only in royal residences, were in fact universal. For enthusiasts like me, its such esoterica which makes Downton so enjoyable.

But as in my love affair with the plantations of the American south, there was a wriggling worm in the bud.

How alike our ruling classes are. How nefarious the sources of their vast wealth, on which such beautiful homes were built.

In the UK, to take just one example, a house as sublime as Harewood, near Leeds, altered by Robert Adam, was funded by the infamous triangular trade. Even English currency came to be defined by slavery. With abolition by Britain in 1833 came compensation to 46,000 slave owners for 800,000 liberated Africans, until the banks were rescued in 2009 the largest government bailout in history.

There were other sources of income. Indian opium, imposed on China. Farms in Ireland. The wealth behind many of the estates of England was no less tainted than that which built plantations in Virginia, Alabama and Georgia.

Fellowes was careful to give his great house a more benign foundation. The Earl of Grantham, we are told, derives his affluence straight from his Yorkshire estates.

Hit hard by agricultural depressions, he takes an option not available to his tenants: he marries the daughter of an American millionaire. That said millionaire is an untitled Jew, a dry goods merchant from Cincinnati, is among storylines meant to show us what a good egg the earl really is, an unlikely egalitarian in tweeds. But hes an imprudent one too: by investing his wifes millions in a Canadian railway that goes bankrupt, Grantham places all his loved ones in peril.

Worse occurred in real life, of course. Much worse. Take the brutal, polluting mills and mines, like so many plantation fields, that often lay just outside the gates.

Of course, Downton isnt real. So, to stay in the realm of art, consider Shipley, the neo-Palladian masterpiece DH Lawrence invented for Lady Chatterleys Lover. There, Squire Leslie Winter talks of the miners who work his pits with all the condescension a planter might have for his slaves.

Chatting with the Prince of Wales, Winter quips: The miners are perhaps not so ornamental as deer, but they are far more profitable.

HRH replies: If there were coal under Sandringham, I would open a mine on the lawns and think it first-rate landscape gardening. Oh, I am quite willing to exchange roe-deer for colliers, at the price.

In the real world, many fine homes have been lost. Their deaths, like their lives, are all about the money.

In Lawrences book, the squire dies and his heirs tear down his hall to build semi-detached villas for workers. Lady Chatterley is shocked to learn such people are as capable of love as she is. One suspects Fellowes, the author of a novel called Snobs, no less, might feel a similar shock if told us ordinary people who love Downton, his facile but beautiful and seductive creation, are capable of sincere feeling too.

We are. And while we are equipped to daydream of such luxury for ourselves, or to pick nits with Fellowes staging while we swoon at his stars in their gorgeous firmament, we are also the heirs to those who did all the work, those who built the Downtons and the plantations.

We know a profound truth behind all their costly beauty and misery. Every stately home, in every land, belongs to us too.

Related posts