The Conversation

A Twitter user, who says their friend teaches elementary school sex ed, recently shared student questions — and they were adorable.

Some of the best questions included:

“Wouldn’t it be just as good if a boy had a baby for a change?” (Yes!)

“Are you sure that someone knows how to get a baby out of there?” (Yes!)

“If you intercourse longer is the baby born bigger?” (Good question!)

The Conversation

Photo by @kimyoogyeom, with permission

First of all: VIRGINIA.

Second of all: How awesome is it that kids are asking such good questions and having myths busted right from the beginning?

I’m especially excited for the child who will soon learn that “intercoursing” does not take 24 hours.

The questions are delightful, and they drive home an important point: Early sex ed is important.

Kids won’t ever stop having questions about sex and keeping the answers from them can lead to confusion.

The American Academy of Pediatrics says that developing healthy sexuality is an important part of development. Starting the discussion early helps kids gain both knowledge and autonomy over their bodies and can help them avoid risky or exploitive behavior.

A 2014 study published in Global Public Health found that kids as young as 10 benefit from learning about sex, gender identity, and contraception. Learning about sex and gender at the very beginning of puberty (or earlier) allows kids to view sex ed not just as risk prevention, but a safe space to learn about consent, their bodies, and its changes.

If we truly want to provide today’s youth with all the tools they need to be safe and healthy, it’s imperative that they learn about sex outside of just abstinence and risk-avoidance. And the best way to do that is by having frank and open discussions about sexuality. It may feel uncomfortable for adults, but for kids it will make a world of difference.

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